Skip to main content
Internet Archive's 25th Anniversary Logo

Full text of "Talking Machine Review 72"

See other formats


INTER NATIONAL 


No. 72 APRIL 1987 


[ISSN 0039-9191] 



A fine G & T Gramophone on a record-storage pedestal. Photograph by J.T. Turner 




■. f : £3 

HHHHHHHI 


Some Marathon Artists 




W.A.whW/S.-. 


Mr. Robert Howe 


mwAYmn wm 


- 

iM»i. Mmitimif tovA. m «r4«r U»i 

:•»* ?e 5 Ik- 









THE 


MONTE 


R E Y 


STORY 


2071 

FINALE 


I remember onr first night at Ponds Farm, standing at the 
bedroom window, actually hearing the silence and watching 
the pale silver of the pond disappear as dark clouds scud- 
ded across the moon. Then we climbed into bed and lay 
listening to the soft pad of Whisky* s feet as he patrolled 
new territory. He would give an occasional aimless 'woof* 
as though he too found the silence strange and wanted to 
reassure himself. Then he was quiet and I was aware of 
faint creaks, rustles and whispers, as the old house sett- 
led down to some secret nocturnal life of its own, 

"We need some fresh air", I said, one afternoon when we 
had been busy with curtains, etc., and so, pulling on our 
terribly new looking gumboots we went for a walk around our 
ten acres. The house stood in about two acres of land and 
we then and there began to plan the renewing of the old 
orchard, the cleaning of the pond and where our flower beds 
and kitchen gardens would be situated. "This is our land", 

I said to Maisie, "every blade of grass, every tree". When 
I opened a large gate at the back, the realisation that the 
two rather soggy looking fields beyond were also ours, 
filled us both with such pride of possession that we almost 
bent down and kissed the muddy earth! 

"Gosh, I could do with a beer", exclaimed Sammy that same 
evening as he drove home the final nail in the new kitchen 
shelves; and so, for the first time we walked the half mile 
of dark lane and for the first time opened the door to the 
warm friendliness of the 'Eagle* and the equally warm wel- 
come of mine host George McKay. George and his wife Doris 
had made the 'Eagle* everything that a small English 
country pub should be, where, whether summer or winter, an 
hour of cheery companionship took pride of place over what 
ever drink was in one's hand. It took just one visit to 
learn that the saloon bar was for passing motorists and 
that the real heart of the 'Eagle* was in the Public Bar, 
where country voices talked of country affairs and Len Eade 
george Sutton, Jimmy Reid and other regulars played domin- 
oes. Len Eade had a small bakery in the village, where 
bread was still handmade and the crusty golden cottage 
loaves he produced were a joy. 

We dropped into the habit when we were at home of setting 
out at nine o'clock to walk to the 'Eagle' t« 3pend an hour 
gossipping with the many friendly people we met there and 
Whisky, our Collie (apart from that in the glass) was a 
great favourite with everyone. He loved these jaunts to 
the 'local' and when the clock struck nine, if we had not 
put on our hats and coats he would rise, yawn, shake him- 
self, look at the clock and stroll over to the door to 
wait expectantly. He knew the time - but then, as George 
Sutton once remarked, "That Whisky's a proper wise owd dog" 

It did not take Sammy long to find digs in this friendly 
village so we all settled down very happily. Perhaps I have 
made all this sound to take place over a short period, but 
it was not so. There were tours or such 'dates* as Luton, 
Reading, etc., where we managed to reach home in the wee 
sma' hours and leave again about three o' clock' the next day 
I loved driving and any theatre within or around eighty 
miles or so was possible, though I usually felt, after a 
stage excitement, coupled with the late hours every night 
(or rather a.m.) all week, my last journey home on a Satur- 
day was just a bit tiring. As a matter of fact it was quite 
surprising the number of theatres we could play and get 
home evBry night... Colchester, Ipswich, Southend, 

Cambridge and others I forget, also nine London Theatres. 
So as you will see, we landed in a fairly handy spot (near 
Chelmsford) when we bought Ponds Farm. 

I have related earlier how Sue, the bull terrier joined us 
at Nottingham, so now we were four. She had obviously been 


ill-treated before we had her and when she found herself well 
loved, she became Maisie' s shadow. I have nevBr seen a human 
and an animal so close as those two were. 

Going away on tour meant that 'Pop' had to be left alone. 

Had it been just for an odd week this would not have been so 
bad, but we could set out on a ten or twelve weeks' round 
Britain Theatres trip and, while it was easy to phone each 
night to hear how he was, it was nevertheless a troublesome 
thought. He was in his late sixties and not particularly 
•young for his age'. We had to find someone who could be 
trusted to visit the house every day and, in general, keep 
an eye on him. 

Everyone we asked said, "Daphne's the girl you want", so 
Maisie and "Daphne" had a chat and "Daphne" - alias Mrs. 
Denis Whybro, was the girl we had. Her husband Denis was in 
the Korean War at the time and she had two young children. 
Pop was a food hoarder and it was Daphne's job to see that 
stale food was thrown out and act as his 'home help'. It was 
a wonderful arrangement. Pa Jones had a real liking for 
Daphne and her children Leslie and Christine so her children 
had a new 'grandfather'. Later - years later - we discovered 
that she was No.21 in the Monte Rey Friendship Circle, which 
was a surprise, but after she agreed to take over we were 
able to go off without any worries. On occasions I used to 
run them all to Southend, during the 'Illuminations' . The 
boy Leslie was almost too young to appreciate the lights but 
some sixteen years later, during which period he had not seen 
me, (after we left Essex to retire to the Island of Arran), 
when we met again the first thing he said was, "When I look 
at you, you bring lights to my mind". I am as usual wander- 
ing off at a tangent but before getting away from Daphne, in 
far, future years ahead, both Daphne and Denis were to prove 
to be our great friends in our need after Maisie had a 
cerebal haemorrhage. 

However, to get back to things Theatrical; I only once 
played Perth Theatre; situated in beautiful surroundings, it 
wa3 more famous for 'Rep* than Music Hall but the audience 
was terrific. 

Later on, I played Inverness and both these Theatres were a 
considerable distance from Ponds Farm but on the return jour- 
ney there was Aberdeen, then Dundee once more. It was nice 
to revisit these two Theatres, which years previously had 
given me such a great start to my 'Variety' career. It is a 
great pity that I never kept a list of my engagements, then 
I could have told you the exact dates on which I appeared at 
every Theatre, though I do not suppose it really matters to 
you the readers. Anyway, wherever we were, after the 
theatre, before supper, we nightly phoned Ponds Farm and it 
was a standing joke among the Professionals who happened to 
be with us - who'd say, "How's your father, how's Ponds Farm, 
how's Whisky, how's Susie and Uncle Tom Cobley and all?" 

In an earlier chapter I wrote about how I followed Allan 
Jones the week after he had played a certain Theatre, and 
mentioned I thought it silly arranging one singer of "Donkey 
Serenade" to follow the other. 

This was not the only instance I met stupidity. Revisiting 
Dundee Palace Theatre on one occasion (I held this Theatre 
record), I found that my name was sole top of the bill, and 
that to my great embarrassment, lower down, was the name 
Robert Wilson, whom I greatly admired. Robert, at that time, 
was possibly the best known Scottish tenor and was certainly 
unsurpassed at such songs as "MacGregor* 8 Gathering". In 
addition his record of "Down in the Glen" (incidentally 
written by my pianist Harry Gordon) was top pop seller of its 
day. Yet here he was, not even on the top line alongside me. 
Frankly I did not need Robert Wilson, nor did Robert Wilson 
need Monte Rey, and I felt it was an insult to Robert on his 


2072 

on his own stamping ground. So the promoter made a mistake. 
Before leaving Robert, I'd like to say that he was the most 
magnificent 'KILTY' I've ever seen. It was always a 
pleasure to come home to' sanity' where all was beautiful 
and the only upset might be if we hadn't had sufficient 
rain to satisfy our potatoes (five acres) or if some of our 
seventy canaries had escaped from the large aviary , or one 
of our 150 poultry had gone off laying. Mundane things 
perhaps, but to us, after the so-called glamour and excitement 
of the stage, . , absolutely marvellous. We came down to 
earth, with a delightful bump. 

One of the nicer aspects of touring was that I had so many 
hundreds of fans who had by our constant meetings , become 
close friends and many still alive have so remained, though 
they must be over aged fifty by now! Recently I had a birth- 
day and although I had retired in 1956, some 180 people took 
the trouble of writing to me, twenty years plus later. I 
could never say the public was fickle. I digress again, 
because this is present history and not the past which I'm 
trying to tell. 

Today, around Finsbury Park, London, area I imagine that fog 
- the real smog - is a thing of the past. I well remember 
terrible week when appearing at Finsbury Park Empire with 
Elsie and Doris Waters, Billy Carroll and Hilda Munday and 
other stars, when on the Monday evening, one such fog descen- 
ded, and we, having come by car, were unable to get home. It 
lasted three days during which time, Maisie and I had to 
sleep in the theatre, which we did quite comfortably, (though 
very reluctantly) owing to the kindness of Elsie and Doris 
who had two marvellous travelling rugs with them, and which 
they loaned to us. So there we were, marooned in a theatre 
only 27 miles from our beloved playground. Even when the fog 
lifted during daylight we were afraid to attempt the journey 
in case (as it surely did) the smog should fall again before 
darkness. No wonder that we began to feel that there must be 
more to life than glamour and applause. 

One day. Pop, Sammy ans myself were laying a horse shoe road 
from the farm gates to the house, the foundations for which 
we got from knocking down a few old buildings and using the 
bricks as rubble. After which the Council supplied us with 
loads of ashes; while with a hose pipe and ERE111, plus a 
large roller hooked on, we drove round and round till we were 
satisfied. This occupied days and we had numerous teabreaks 
between. During one of the teabreaks Maisie glanced at the 
farm gate and noticed a man, woman and two children looking 
very interested. I went to speak to them and discovered that 
they had travelled from Worcester just to see the house in 
which we live. We asked them to join us for tea, along with 
the pigeons, the poultry, the wild doves and the wild fowl 
from the pond. They told us they had once been to London to 
look at our flat where we lived in Myatts Park. That was 
Mr. and Mrs. Bishop with their children Joy and Gary, whose 
children had the middle name of Dudley (from the Hippodrome) 
and one of Aston where they had heard me while still unborn. 
Hence the middle names. If there's anything about 'dates', 
when I retired etc I only had to ask 'Flo' - Mrs. Bleasdale 
a Geraldo fan - she can inform me of everything. When we 
finally arrived in Arran I realised I hadn't a single Monte 
Rey record with me .When she knew, Flo started my collection 
by producing over thirty 78' s. I wonder if the young people 
of today will remain through all the years such loyal fans 
as these. Maybe I didn't realise it but I was truly blessed, 
as Maisie often told me, 

I have written so much about our Country Home, that you 
will have begun to realise it was becoming more important 
than the stage. In fact, though we didn't realise it our- 
selves, we were beginning to resent the touring which meant 
us leaving 'home' for weeks on end. Apart from this I was 
reluctant to face an audience night after night and week 
after week and at times felt I did not have the will to keep 
on singing. The voice was not failing, the applause was just 
as much as usual but something inside me - spiritual - or 


whatever it was, made me lose the joy of singing. By 1953 
or 54 it seemed as if I was just going through the motions 
and there was nothing real reaching the Public. After all 
I had been thirtenn years really singing full power as a 
'Headliner' on music halls, etc., but that wasn't all .Before 
this I had been working hard with Geraldo and then Joe Loss 
and others since I became Monte Rey in 1934. Not only 
that, but as Montgomery Fyffe I had been singing 'highbrow' 
professionally for about five years which means I had been 
vocalising non stop for some 26 years. Looking back it is 
clear that I was not bom with the old timers' music hall 
instincts which enabled them to go on year after year until 
they "died". By the end of 1954 I was doing less and less, 
and by 1955 was not doing half the work I had done in the 
previous years. Sometime on 1956 I decided to throw in the 
towel despite the fact that what must have been the "Third 
Generation" of teenagers was still yelling for me. Waiting 
at the stage door shouting, "We want Monte". It never seemed 
to strike them that I had been a pinup boy for their mothers 
and perhaps their grandmothers. So one day we just said, "NO 
MORE" and that was tha we both thought. Many months later 
the agent phoned offering me a lucrative four weeks at a 
provincial theatre. He coaxed and coaxed until, despite 
Maisie' s expressed regret, I fell. I was singing well enough 
acting well enough, but was S0 UNHAPPY that I even tried to 
get the 'sack' during the middle of the second week by pick- 
ing a quarrel with the owner of the theatre. Alas I had to 
fulfill those unhappy weeks. It was certainly goodbye after 
that. Goodbye without one single regret. I'd had a 
wonderful time and great happiness al}. my life, until as I 
write this in I98O I am still remembered by many fans who 
write to me on Arran. 

Her Grace, the Duchess of Montrose had told me there would 
always be a home (cottage) for me on the Isle of Arran, to 
which I could retire at any time I wanted to come home to 
Scotland. Well in June 1957 that day arrived and Maisie 
and I set off for a new kind of life in this beautiful 
Island far away from the life to which we had become 
accustomed. Some weeks before leaving, after hearing that 
everything was arranged, we sold Ponds Farm, then received 
a shock. The Duchess died suddenly and there was no mention 
of a house in her will. So there we were without a home. It 
was a terrible fright, but some three weeks later her daughter 
Lady Jean Fforde phoned me to say that her mother had told 
her about the house, and that there were two cottages, either 
of which we could have for life though it would not belong 
to us. It was like waking from a bad dream. 

The ma nn er of our journey was different from that which we 
had intended. Having two dogs, neither of which had 
travelled anywhere before, we wondered how they would accept 
the long journey by train and boat. We had purchased four 
first class rail tickets, but when the pantechnicon arrived 
at Ponds Farm the night before our journey we had a really 
daft idea. We had told the driver that he could load up 
but to save himself looking for a room for the night, he 
could leave a bed in one of the rooms. During the early 
morning (about 2 a.m.) Maisie wakened me and asked if I'd go 
to the window to see if the rear doors of the lorry were 
half-doors, I.E. could the upper half remain open with the 
lower half closed? They could, so Maisie said, "Let's 
travel in the back of the lorry." When we put the idea to 
the driver he said we'd be exhausted, but there was room 
beside him and the dogs could be shut in the back. This was 
not the idea and when we suggested the dogs' old arm chairs 
(which were to be burnt) and ours be loaded last of all, so 
that we could chain the dogs loosely to their chairs and we 
sit comfortably in ours he really thought we were insane. 
However, we were breaking no law so we travelled like gypsies 
and were singing most of the way. About 450 miles in the 
back of the lorry stopping every two hours to exercise the 
dogs. Thus we entered our new home town of Brodick, and as 
we were with the furniture we fitted it into its new 
surroundings and there it remained exactly as it was, for 



the next sixteen years. We had sold all the large furni- 
ture and what we kept was remarkably right for our new, 
smaller surroundings. 

This in June, 1957, ended the story of Monte Rey, known 
as Radio's Romantic Singer. 


2073 

Editor's comment = No. It was not the end because so many 
fans having made the suggestion, the late 1 970 * s saw the 
reissue of Monte Rey's 78rpm records on Long Play records. 
Two were under his own name while others were as the named 
vocalist with various of the great British dance bands. 




Absolutely Free 


DO YOU WANT IT? IF SO, READ DIRECTIONS AT FOOT. 


BASIL HALLAM 
The real name of the famous Musical Comedy 
star Basil Hallam ('Gilbert the Filbert') 
was, (Captain) Basil Hallam RADFORD. He was 
attached to 3KB Section, No.1 Balloon 
Squadron of the Royal Flying Corps. He was 
killed after falling from his balloon on 
30th. August, (? 1916) when near ACHEUX, 

France. My information is taken from "The 
Balloonatics" written by Alan Morris, 
published by Jarrolds, 1970. I expect that 
this book is available through the library 
service, if you want to know any 
information of the "Balloonatics" . Basil 
Hallam was engaged in observation of the 
enemy's movements. 

CHARLES PENROSE 
I was most interested in the comment on the 
non— laughing Charles Penrose record of "Oh 
•ampstead". I have another which is on Scala 
639, "THE BLOKE WOT'S LEFT BEHIND" ( A 
Cockney! s Lament) which is rather an odd 
recording. It is a serious-cum-eomic rhyming 
monologue portraying a cockney who has beea 
refused application to "Join-up" on bad teeth. 

laments how his chums will look upon 
him when they return from fighting the 
Germans, despising him because he didn't 
enlist and "do his bit" for his country. On 
the reverse of the record is "BILLY WHITLOCK 
AS A SPECIAL CONSTABLE" by "Whitlock & Co." 
which incidentally is the 'A* side of the 
record. I get the feeling that this Penrose 
recording was to "fill the record" so to 
speak, as Scala Records 635 & 636 are all 
sides by Billy Whitlock, I am assuming that 
637 & 638 could have been Whitlock issues as 
well, which brings us to 639 of which one 
side is by Whitlock; maybe there was not 
another Billy Whitlock recording to put on 
the *B* side of the record, so we have "A 
COCKNEY'S LAMENT' to fill up the number of 
records allocated in the Scala catalogue. 

AVIATION ON RECORDS 
I can add a couple of ragtime pieces with aviation reference each 
-Firstly, 'That Aeroplane Glide' (Israel) by Prince's Ma.e unde: 
Guarte+te on Columbia-Rena 2016. Nothing very exciting in a C o] 
the words of the song, although the occupants of the flying Grap] 
machine do manage to fly round the moon and visit the Milky April 
Way'. 1 . Secondly, "The Aeroplane Walk" which featured in the ' 

musical revue "As You Were" (Pavilion Theatre, London, 1918) 0 f •: 
I have a recording of it on H M V C874 by the Mayfair Orches even 
tra, in which is included in a "selection", so can not add the 1 
anything regarding the lyrics. The composer is H.Darewski,so from 
it should be available as sheet-music. be m 

THE JUNO PHONOGRAPH 00n3 

I had previously thought that the 'Puck' type of phonographs a 
were just about the cheapest type of cylinder machines ^ 

commercially available until I saw this advertisement. You 
will see that this "latest production in phonographs" was 
sent free simply by selling 9 articles of jewellry at Is 6d S P°° 


IT SPEAKS FOR ITSELF. 

It will sing, talk, play, tell a funny story, 
and amuse a room full of people, 
w An excellent reproducer, very clear 
and distinct in tone. We give 


FOR 

PARTIES 

AND 

EVENINC 


JUST FANCY ! 


VVfNr&etb tnr &emtLL£Rr 

ml XJ0 aach. 

WRITE AT ONCE FOR THt JEWELLERY. 


THE LATEST PR00UCTI0H IH PHONOGRAPHS. 


Write ua a post card with your name and full nddress. Baying—' ‘Please send me th^ninearticles of Jewellery, 
price 1 6 each, which 1 will do my beat to sell for you, but should I fail to ael them T a«rree to return any unsold 
wit lu four week* from date. It is understood that when voa have received the 13/6 obtained by the sale of 
them you will send ine ABSOLUTELY FREE a Juno Phonograph as shown alnive. or an> other present I 
may choose. In the event of » smaller sale, you wiil send me pr# sent equal to the amount s- nt in.” far We 
• Iso give away ABSOLUTELY FREE for selling nine articles of Jswelleyy at 1/6 each. Watches, Clocks. 
Cameras, R ntf«, 4c., 4c. We send you, with the Jewellery, complete Catalogue of Presents, in which you 
will and pages of lovely gifts to choose from. Our Jeweller* - , which we ask you to sell, is handsome and artistic . 
you o^n sell the lot in a few minutes. Write for it as above to-night. 

When writing, state whether Mr., Mrs., or Mies. 


BRITISH PREMIUM SYNDICATE (Dept. 73 ), 282, Central Chambers, CLASCOW, 



2074 

were formed as part of the tin-plate base of the machine. 
This raises the question, "Did the record come as a separate 
item or was it permanently part of the spool or mandrel, as 
in a similar fashion to those records of Henri Lioret? Also, 
what size were the records? From the illustration, it would 
appear they were not interchangeable with any standard size 
of cylinder record. 

I wonder if any collector possesses one of these curious 
phonographs, or indeed if any have survived at all? 

AIRCRAFT PRODUCTS LTD. 

This is a very tenuous aviation connection 1 
It is an advertisement which appeared in "Popular Music and 
Dancing Weekly" issue No. 10 for 15th. December, 1934. I 
shall rewrite it in full - 
" 5 records of world favourites by 
The Cafe Colette Orchestra 
FREE 

The above astounding offer is made to 
every purchasers of ONE PACKET ONLY of 


"our famous ‘double life 1 , 100# Sheffield 
3-hole type, razor blades at 1/- per packet 
of 15 blades plus postage and packing 6d. 

These five complete records of 'world favourites' 
are specially recorded for us at GREAT COST by 
the above famous broadcasting band and are 
YOURS, absolutely FREE . Just send 1/6 now 
to receive 15 blades and 5 free records. Money 
refunded if blades are not as good as any 4d. blade 
obtainable . 

AIRCRAFT PRODUCTS LTD. (Dept 0.F.R.2) 

89. New Oxford Street, London W C 1. 

Make of that what you will! I Notice that no refund 
is given on the records! I expect the discs were of 
the Durium type, of small diameter. 

Editor's comment = Aircraft Products also sold a similar 
little album of 4-inch records by famous music hall artists. 
We do not know of the 'conditions of sale*. 


LETTER ABOUT 'MYSTERY RECORD* 
on page 2068 of our last issue. From Donald Taylor 

"The top half of the record label looks like nothing I've 
ever seen, the lower half seems to have the same general 
layout as Beatall Record. Using the picture in Rainer Lotz's 
German Record Label book, the following points of similarity 
can be noticed. 

1 ) Between the phrases "Recorded in England" and "Pressed in 
Prussia" both records have an unusual squiggle resembling 
a division sign. 

2) Immediately above this, both have the "Order Number" 

3) Just below the spindle hole we have (on the left) a 
summary of the instrumentation, and (on the right) a 6 or 7 
digit "control" number. 

4) The long "control" numbers on the Beatall seem to be 
generated by taking the original master number and putting 
extra digits on each end. The control number on the 
mystery label might have a similar origin, judging by the 
fact that the first and last digits look a bit different 
from those in the middle. 

I realise that all this does not PROVE anything, but it 
may provide a starting point. MY own guess is that the folk 
who pressed the Beatall label (whoever they were) are respon- 
sible for the mystery label. 

What do the rest of you say? 

Don Taylor. 


W E 


ARE NOT AMUSED 




* * * * 


May your Editor add something that might, or might not 
contribute to solving the "problem"? 

Somewhile ago Mr. Walker gave me some records, two of which 
were the "mystery" records upon which The Stars Record labels 
had been over-stuck. Thus - 
mystery 74 . The Stars Record 74 duets sung by Messrs 
W.Virgo and Chapman- All's well (5170) 

" " The larboard watch (5169) 

mystery 97 The Stars Record 97 

Mr. Arthur Field - Cheer up my Highland, Lassie (5251 ) 
Billy Williams - I must go home tonight (B7a) 

BUT- 

Polyphon 8609 The Stars Record 59 

Albert Milller (bells) La Serenade waltz (3094) 

" " Tirolese March (3092) 

Polyphon 8618 The Stars Record 144 

Sextette of the Choir of St .Paxil's Cathedral - 
Oh God, our help in ages past (10577) 

Abide with me (10578) (10578) 

Polyphon 8863 Lyric Record 655 

Billy Whitlock - Troubles (10927) 

» B.W. at the North Pole(10928) 

Both the Lyric and The Stars labels have at the bottom— 
•Recorded in England Pressed Abroad* 


Over the past quarter of a century, your Editor and some 
close friends have undertaken long hours of research in 
dark and dusty archives, collections, libraries and 
anywhere in which we thought knowledge of the history of 
recording might be found. We have also borrowed old 
catalogues and pictures with which we have enhanced the 
pages of this magazine. Quite a lot of this research and 
borrowing has cost us money - if only in train or bus 
fares . 

Thus we very strongly disapprove when we see items which 
have been printed in 'The Talking Machine Review* already, 
appearing in contemporary magazines without so much as a 
written request for re-use. It must be admitted that 
more then one original of any rare item may exist and two 
or more editors might independently think of publishing 
the same thing. ... But this Editor has been caused to 
be very suspicious lately. ... Especially when an 
article by one of our American friends appeared recently 
without prior request. 

We hope our lack of pleasure will not be turned to wrath. 

All of your Editor's foregoing observations may only 
prove that out - of - date or surplus stock was bought up 
by others who pasted-on their own labels, which perhaps 
contributes nothing towards unravelling the mystery. 

Does anyone have any Beatall records from which he could 
send us full details ? 

Lastly, your Editor has a couple of Operaphone Records 
which have, at the bottom of the label 'Recorded in 
England * Pressed in Prussia' . They also have the words 
Order Number: in the same typeface as our 'mystery' . 

They also use matrix numbers in the 5>000 series. E.g.- 
5 Mr. Dougal McNab - I love a lassie (5148) 

" Stop your tickling, Jockl(5140) 

77 Miss Florence Bruce-He was a prince (5107) 

" The choir boy (5186) 

Although Miss Bruce sings in a good mezzo-sopranc/ 
contralto voice on 5107, it is a tenor who sings 
on 51861 That number is on both the label and in 
the shellac. The words make it clear that a choir 
boy is not being sung to, (or shouldxnot have been). 
Now to Mr. McNab. He is neither Harry Lauder nor Peter 
Dawson. Despite similar matrix numbers, 5148 has a band 
accompaniment and is "forward", whereas 5140 is quiet 
and "distant" with piano, going rather fast for the song 
so much so that I wonder if it is a different Mr McNab I 
Slowing it down does not make it sound flat. 

Could readers send us details of any Operaphone records 
they may have? Well, let's take it further, could we 
have details of any old records having 4— digit matrices 
beginning 5- 



PIPE - MAJOR H. FORSYTH 


THE PRINCE OF WALES'PIPER" 


2075 


u 

Pipe -Major Forsyth enjoys the distinction of being the 
official piper to the Prince of Wales. He is a piper out and 
out. If he is asked why so many people make fun of the bag- 
pipes - he has but one terse reply, "Ignorance". It is per- 
haps because of his determined faith in his beloved instru- 
ment that the genial pipe-major has made some of the best 
records for the talking machines of the best known companies 
including Pathl, the Gramophone, Columbia, Edison Bell, and 
Odeon. "I find," he said to me, when I called upon him in 
his Clapham home, "that the old national airs of Scotland, 
like the 'Cock of the North* remain the favourites wherever 
the records are reproduced. Of course pipes are a national 
instrument, and are best heard when they are interpreting in 
a strange, inexplicable, but always .effective way, the senti 
ments of the Scots people. 

Pipe-Major Forsyth has been wedded to the pipes all his life. 
He prefers to sum up his life in a very few words. "I was 
bom and brought up in Edinburgh, and I was taught the pipes 
by an eminent piper, who served under the Marquis of Lome - 
the present Duke of Argyll. When I was sixteen years of age 
I joined the Scots Guards, and remained with them for eight- 
een years, and then I was appointed three years ago piper to 
the Prince of Wales, which position I still have the honour 
to occupy. I can say, with truth, that I have played before 
most of the crowned heads of Europe. The King and &ueen, The 
Prince and Princess of Wales, the Duke of Connaught, and most 
of our Royalties are very fond of the pipes, and the instru- 
ment finds great favour, as I know from the personal privi- 
lege of performing before them, with the Kaiser, the King and 
Queen of Spain, the King and Queen of Norway, and the King 
and Queen of Portugal. When Prince Fushimi came over here as 
the representative of the Mikado I had the pleasure of play- 
ing at one of the banquets given in his honour and he was 
delighted with the music, the like of which he had probably 
never heard. Now it is a curious thing that, while the bag- 
pipes among a certain class are made fun of, they meet with 
unexpected quarters. Many of our native Indian regiments 
have adopted them, and even the Sudanese have taken them up. 
But, as you say, these are some people who jeer at them, but 
they are empty-headed and have no taste for the true essence 
of music. Of course a great many people take their idea of 
the pipes from some people who attempt to play in the streets. 
I have not seen a really good player of the pipes on the 
streets, and it is unfair to form a general judgement of the 
pipes on the basis of these doubtful performances. 

• ••••• • 

(This article extracted from the 'Talking Machine 
News' of February, 1 908) 

MY FAVOURITE LABELS 
I do not suppose that I am the first (or the last) to see a 
pile of records in a junk shop, and, going through them, say 
"That's a nice label. I must have that", regardless of the 
musical contents. 

I am a sucker for Pathl 'Actuelle* records and never pass 
them by. Those octagonal labels with their rich gold 
surround and the tasteful ivory, pale green .or pale pink 
centre. I haven't very many and some of them sound a bit 
grim - but who cares? I have a French 'Actuelle* made of 
some brown substance, with a black label and the usual gold 
octagon. Very classy: but I prefer the British version.Wbat 
were the America issues like? Perhaps someone will tell us. 

Talking of Pathl I have a 30cm French issue, electrical 
recording, with a distinctive "art deco" label in orange and 
white with black lining. I suspect that this was quite a 
famous design in its day. 

Early electric 'Homochord' labels are a sumptuous red, gold 
and black. At least, the Hayes pressings are. The 'Stemo' 
pressings are a bit dowdy. 

Talking of "Stemo", No 256 (matrix S310): 'Piccolo Pete / 


Wherever I have been I have found the pipes are very much 
appreciated, and I am still giving lessons to a number of 
people who are anxious to learn. But they find out this: 
the pipes are one of the most difficult instruments you can 
find. I have turned out, if I may use the term, six veiy 
good pipers for the London Scottish, and I find that, after 
course of careful study, my pupils become almost as great 
enthusiasts as myself. You ask me if the great musicians 
appreciate the pipes. I cannot see how they can help it, 
but there are difficulties . The late Dan Godfrey and other 
conductors have tried time after time to incorporate the 
pipes with orchestra. They could not do it, however. We 
have only nine notes, from G to A above the line, and the 
restrictions here involved means that the pipes can only be 
used with the band in the simplest of tunes. In the case of 
any elaborate music the partnership would be out of the 
question. 

Remembering the great Dargai incident, where Piper Findlater 
played his regiment on to victory, although shot in both 
legs, I asked Mr. Forsyth if he had anything of the effects 
of the inspiriting charm of the bagpipes in war. 

"No," he replied. "I was certainly in the South African War, 
and I can tell you that I found that the Boers were very 
fond of the pipes, which they called the "sack doodles". Of 
course the pipes, which were once employed to sound 'the 
charge', are not likely to be much used now, as hand to hand 
fights are out of date, and, fighting the enemy at long 
range, one requires silence. I have never had the honour of 
playing 'the charge'. I am very glad that the pipes have 
proved such a success on the talking machine. This is a 
very severe test, and the success proves what experts all 
know, that the instrument is extremely delicate and 
requires as much attention as a first class piano or violin. 
Of course the bagpipes are heard at their best among the 
hills - 'the haunting music' of which we have read, but 
even in a great building like the Albert Hall or Queen's 
Hall you can secure some wonderful effects, which cannot 
fail to be appreciated by those who possess a keen ear for 
real music. Of course the open tone becomes more mellow. 

A set of pipes costs anything from £5 to £50, but there are 
some elaborate gold-mounted sets which might reach the price 
of £300. This was the amount paid for a set presented to 
Kaid Sir Harry Maclean by the Sultan of Morocco. The Raid is 
a wonderful enthusiast, and when he was captured by Raisuli 
I had to forward his pipes to him in his captivity arranging 
for them to be sent to the famous brigand's stronghold. The 
Moors are wonderfully struck by the pipes, which are singu- 
larly adapted to some of the most popular Moorish tunes" 

by GEOFF PERCIVAL 

When Niccolo plays his piccolo" by Bert Madison and his Band, 
with anonyomous vocal (actually Fred Douglas) has a veiy non- 
Stemo appearance and sound. Gould it actually be the same as 
Dominion A230, despite the discrepancy? Arthur Badrock lists 
this as being by Jay Wilbur's Band - but he also mentions 
that there was an unofficial "hot line" between the two com 
companies through a senior official. We must get Sherlock 
Holmes on to this! 

But, back to attractive labels. Everybody seems to like the 
red/ green/ gold combination of Regal - Zonophones; but I have 
a weakness for all the later Zonophones, especially when they 
switched to a bright, sharp green. Know what I mean? 

Imperial came out with some nice labels. I have an early 
acoustic of Ian Colquhoun, which he announces himself. This 
is an elaborate label, complete with curtains, swags and crown 
in purple and gold, topped with an Imperial crown. The main 
part of the label is pale grey with black lettering. The 
final Crystalate-issued Imperials are nice and smart, with the 
black border and bright red middle. The earlier type in two 
shades of red strike me as a bit 'wishy-washy* ; but ohl Those 
two-toned mauves. I could eat theml 



2076 

My favourites are the pre-electric Imperials, a clear mid- 
blue with gold curtains, swags and crown. But have you 
noticed a number of variations on these? Some are more 
•crisp* than others, 

Duophone rang the changes, too. The purple and black labels 
though neat are nothing to write home about in my view; and 
the black^nd-red ones on the laminated series are even less 
inspired; but I have a pre-electric record in black and deep 
lilac, depicting their remarkable double soundbox. (I have a 
bag for this record). In passing, can anyone tell us what t 
this soundbox sounded like? It was meant to be a sort of 
acoustic tweeter-and-woofer combination, I saw one in a shop 
window once - but the man would not part with it I 

The earlier Piccadilly labels were attractive,,. The white - 

BOOK REVIEW by FRANK ANDREWS 

of "THE COMPLETE 

1 have reviewed this book as a complete ignoramus when it 
comes to questions of repairs and restorations to talking 
machines, objects which do not interest me to any great extent 
at all. "Phonographs" in the sub-title also includes machines 
that play discs. One question arises - how old does a machine 
have to be to be classed as"antique"? 

Mr. Reiss is an American and the book is published in America 
but it has a strong international appeal in that it deals with 
phonographs, gramophones and graphophones manufactured mostly 
by the big names in the Talking Machine Industry such as 
Edison, Columbia, Zon-O-phone, E Berliner and Gramophone & 
Victor. Seeing that all these names were household words in 
Britain (with Victor contributing to the Gramophones) the 
appeal of this book to the British reader should be almost as 
great as to American readers. 

The bulk of the book is lavishly illustrated with photographs 
and diagrams and a text explaining how machines and parts are 
constructed and operate with instructions on how to repair 
and restore same. It is divided into three sections . 

Section 1 deals with the moving parts of the machines. Section 

2 deals with all the acoustical aspects and problems that are 
met, and section 3 deals with cabinets, horns and metal parts 
that may need repairs or restoration. 

From my novice's point of view, this work should fill 
a need for those collectors who have an interest in machines 
with the urge to bring them back to an "as new" condition. I 
at present know of no other book which deals as comprehensively 
as does this with reference to the different types of machines 
which were around in the early years of the industry. 

I am unable to vouch that the procedures mentioned and the 
advice given is of the best. I can only surmise that whatever 
problem is presented, the author has himself practised what he 
preaches, and that the results he has attained have justified 
the methods he describes and recommends. 

It may be that others will advise him of better ways of carry- 
ing out some of the chores he elucidates upon, if so a second 
edition of this book will be even more precise on the best way 
to tackle some of the problems - if such is necessary. 

Some short sections at the back of the book comprise a Biblio- 
graphy and a number of appendices on subjects associated with 
the bulk of the book - those on soldering and on stroboscopes 
being the most relevant. 

Appendix "F" dealing with a portrait gallery of machines and 
the companies responsible for them has a number of inaccuracies 

For the Gramophone , the three distributors in the USA were 
not given. The National Gramophone Company did NOT belong to 
Emile Berliner and Eldridge Johnson's firm was NOT the 
Consolidated Gramophone Company. The FOUR companies which 


and-gold ones, that is. The red celebrity issues were 
nothing special, visually speaking. 

And what about the acoustic pre-1914 Albion labels? Simply 
gorgeous. Winner came up with some nice full-colour 
designs, too. Have you noticed the two different hat-types 
of the man-on-the-course? 

Pre-electric Vocalions were dignified, a large square 
format with a blue middle and fancy gold-and-black border. 
Had the designer seen the Actuelles? 

Well, now, having opened up the subject, perhaps other 
readers might step forward with some of their favourite 
labels . 

Editor's comments; The late Major Annand had a large cabinet 
type of Duophone machine complete with double-soundbox. It 
sounded good - but not special, or spectacular. 

TALKING MACHINE" by E. L. REISS 
distributed the Gramophone in the U S A, in chronological 
order were 'The United States Gramophone Company' , 'The 
Berliner Gramophone Company* , 'The National Gramophone Com- 
pany* and the 'Consolidated Talking Machine Company*. The 
Gramophone Company of London, and its successors, were not 
affiliates of the Victor Talking Machine Company until the 
early 1920's. 

The Zon-O-Phones . These were NOT marketed, from the first, 
by the Universal Talking Machine Company - it was the 
Manufacturer. The marketeers were the National Gramophone 
Corporation and when they failed, in 1901, the Universal 
Talking Machine Company took over with a new company, the 
Universal Talking Machine Manufacturing Compnay, becoming 
the manufacturers. These two companies were NOT bought out 
"in late 1904" by the Victor Talking Machine Company. They 
were acquired by the Gramophone & Typewriter Limited (of 
London) in June 1903, and resold to the Victor company in 
September of the same year. There is no mention in the 
book of the large European side of the Zonophone business 
and its machines. 

Columbia . The American Graphophone Company did NOT become 
part of the Columbia Phonograph Company in 1894. Those 
two companies, in 1894, formed a new company, the "Columbia 
Phonograph Company, General", which was formed to to be 
the world wide distributor of Columbia merchandise, except 
for the District of Columbia and two of the states in the 
United States of America, whic franchise belonged to the 
Columbia Phonograph Company of Washington, D.C. 

It is a great pity that a modem book should still carry 
myths about the histories of some early companies, however 
I do recommend this book, with its main objective, to those 
would be repairers and restorers of old machines. The 
instructions are directed at the uninitiated, like myself, 
but one should always bear in mind that there are often 
alternative ways, perhaps better ways, of carrying out 
some of the tasks of which our author may be unaware. 

The book as 184 pages. It is published by The Vestal Press 
Of P.0.Box 97, Vestal, New York 13850, USA. The page 
size is di x 11 inches. In soft cover it costs $14.95; 
in hard cover it costs $24.95. Postage inside USA is $2, 
or by UPS it is $3. It will naturally be more outside 
USA for postage. 

ANOTHER REVIEW BY BARRY WILLIAMSON 
The book is described as a guide to the restoration of 
antique phonographs and surely this is a gap in the current 
literature. The main book is in three sections 'Mechanics' 
•Acoustics* and 'Cosmetics', whic is pretty basic and self- 
explanatory. These are followed by a fairly superfluous 
Bibliography and six strangely assorted Appendeces. Why 
on earth does soldering justify an appendix when electro- 


plating comes into the text of cosmetics. Most of the 
appendices will provide interest only to the total newcomer 
to the hobby, and appendix F, potentially the most useful 
turns out to be superficial, less than entirely accurate and 
gives an indication that the author suffers from that phono- 
phobia which causes the sufferer to believe that sound- 
recording history ended in 1912. 

Some may judge it unjust or unfair that one who is wholly 
and occupationally involved in the supply of spare parts 
and to some degree in the repair of gramophones and phono- 
graphs should be writing in a hobby magazine on this subject, 
but my experience of fitting some 200 to 250 springs each and 
the repair / overhaul of a greater number of soundboxes / 
reproducers annually does give some value to my remarks. 
Perhaps my reading of this book got off to a bad start 
because my copy opened itself at page 87 and my eye was 
immediately drawn to a photograph •Drilling out a broken 
hinge pin . . * illustrating a method totally lacking virtue. 
The text turned out to be on page 88 and described 
(incompletely) the opposite and correct way of doing it. 
Undismayed I turned to page 9, the section on Mechanics, the 
Spring Motor, How it works and I am pleased to report that I 
was unable to find any error in the first six lines but from 
there the path was more dales then hills. Before the page 
was out I was wanting to point out to Mr. Reiss that grease 
does not attract dirt and dust but will cause the dirt and 
dust to adhere which is quite a different matter, pedantic 
maybe but why be inaccurate? Three lines on and he is 
accepting Vaseline as an alternative to his preferred dry 
gears. In the 1980's the oil companies produce a range of 
greases which are vastly superior to anything available to 
the original owners of our machines, why someone who feels 
qualified to write a book should advocate a product intended 
for general household use baffles me. 

There follows a mish-mash of advice some good, some bad, 
some to be tried with more caution than advocated, some not 
to be attempted unless you have the necessary experience and 
skill but all in all a veritable minefield for the inexper- 
ienced. A few examples. Page 19. Photograph of tap and 
stock presumably intended for the inexperianced who would 
not know what it looked like. But no warning about the need 
to drill to accurate tap sizes and the aweful risks of 
broken taps, especially the small sizes. 

Page 25. Removing the retaining ring from a new mainspring 
by a 'Good way* which is bizarre to say the least, sounds 
more like a perty game and is damaging to the spring. I add 
that the employment of this method invalidates the 1 2-month 
guarantee that goes with Phonoservice mainsprings.) 


2077 

Page 27/8. Replacement of worn bearings; A silly section 
telling you that you can ream out the old bearing and fit 
a new brass one then goes on to say that the tricky part 
is reaming out accurately so the new bearing sits in the 
right position. Yes tricky indeed but how do you do it and 
if he's not going to tell us, why mention it? 

Page 28- we are told that brass gears will wear steel gears 
and I would not argue with that although it is less common 
than he suggests. Then he goes on to say that brass will 
wear a fibre. Will it? I've seen many worn fibre gears but 
never seen the driving gear worn by it, and come to that, 
I've never seen a fibre gear driven by brass. 

Page 65} we are advised to build up sound-box pivot points 
with hard solder ... but no word of caution about the 
material of the sound-box body. 

And so on it goes with good ideas interspersed with bad and 
often bizarre notions, endless cautions at some points and 
none at all at others. 

It is difficult to decide to whom this book is aimed 
because it is too rash for the newcomer to the hobby and 
insufficiently detailed for the experienced - but 
dangerously it appears to be suitable for the newcomer. It 
is well produced with clear photographs and if you feel 
the need to fill a space on your bookshelf it is a must I 
suppose, if you feel you must have every book available on 
the subject it is a must. If you want a good addition to 
your library, I would not recommend it. 

A final point. If you think my disapproval is a professional 
fear that I will lose business you would be entirely wrong. 

I can only undertake a limited range of repairs due to lack 
of time, for which very reason well over 90$ of 'the 
suggested repairs could not be undertaken by me. 

»•••••»•••••••••************* 

A good long time ago, your Editor wrote in these pages 
that one could allow a spring to come out in a sack in 
order to restrain it. That was written in the days when 
sacks were made of very strong natural fibrous material. 

Modem sacks of any manma de plastic material are just not 
to be used. A spring escaping from a barrel is an 
extremely powerful thing which would just cut itself out 
of a modern plastic sack (however thick) so fast that you 
could rapidly be very badly injured or maimed, before you 
had time to know what had happened. 

So, be safe. Whatever method you use to extract a spring 
from its barrel, remember that it is something not to be 
undertaken with anything other than extreme care. 


DON CARLOS 
On 22nd April, 1941, I had to report for military service at 
Kennington, near Ashford in Kent, and was put into a training 
unit called 'Wavell Squad' . There were about 20-25 men in 
this squad and Birrell O'Malley was one, so I suppose he had 
an army number close to my own, and we got to know each other 
quite well, as most people did under the circumstances. 

About four months later when we were posted to Tonbridge, he 
was suddenly posted away to some kind of army entertainments 
unit and I have never met him since. 

However, all the Troise records that I have, or have heard, 
seem to feature him as Don Carlos, as do various film 
extracts . 

All the intake in 1941 to this training were either 20 year- 
olds like myself, or those in the 37 age group like O'Malley, 
so if he is still around, he'll be in his early 80's. I do 
recall that he received quite a lot of music through the post 
and would probably have been more forthcoming, but we had an 
East-ender named Sampson in the squad who tended to shout 
his mouth off quite a lot about "Don Carlos", and inhibited 
O'Malley who was a quiet man. Sincerely, George Frow. 


OBITUARY 
It is with regret that we convey the news that 
Sir George Thalben Ball died on 18th. January, 1987, aged 
90. This famous organist visited Bournemouth when aged 
over 80 to play a recital in St. Peter's Church, and it was 
gratifying that the church was full to hear him play, and 
as there were a good many young people present it was clear 
that his reputation did not depend on old records . In our 
issue No. 59, page 1557, Derek Pain contributed an appreciat- 
ion of Sir George. Hearing how skilfull he still was at 
an advanced age, one could only reflect how great he must 
have been in his prime - when I was just a boy, in fact. 


OBITUARY 

As we go to press news has arrived of the death of 
Raymond Howl of Wednesbury. 

I first met him in I968, since when he has always been 
one of the nicest collectors one could know. 

That is how I shall always remember him. 


2078 


EDITORIAL 


ROUND 


U P 


Systematic discography has been established for a good many 
years now. It is sin understandable craft to record-collect 
ors, for it enables them to see just how many records their 
favourite artists made, how many of them were actually 
released for sale, and how many more could be released if 
the owners of the original masters or test-pressings could 
be persuaded to issue them on records, which these days 
usually means an Lp compilations. 

There is no book of, say, the discography of EVERY, operatic 
singer. There are books on many singers, some of which 
have apologetic listings as an appendix popped in at the 
end. The contemporary magazine The Record Collector, begun 
by the late and fine James Dennis, now edited by Clifford 
Williams, formerly of the Welsh National Opera, over the 
past 30 plus years has been giving detailed articles on 
operatic singers, usually with a discography of the main 
subject of each issue. Some of these have dealt with 
singers whose careers were during the first years of the 
recording industry, but later singers are not ignored as 
exemplified by the current edition dealing with the 
Australian soprano, who recorded from 1928 to 1 97^, Marjorie 
Lawrence, but nevertheless spent m«st of her life in a 
wheel chair. 

Similarly, reissue Lp records, while bringing to us again 
valuable performances of the past, are rarely part of a 
systematic progress. The major companies usually release 
bits and pieces from all over the place. It often occurs 
that, whether your preference be for opera, jazz, brass 
bands, or ocarinas, you often have certain more "popular" 
pieces of an artistes repertoire in more than one, or 
several compilations , while certain important items stay 
for ever ignored. Admittedly, even one's very favourite 
performer may be admitted to have had a "bad day", but if 
his audience endured (H) it, such a master lingering on 
the shelves of a recording could be issued for the sake of 
completeness - perhaps as the last 'track* on an Lp where 
one could conveniently stop the record if necessary. 

This "bits and pieces" compilation annoys me. So do the 
compilations which jumble-up an artist's work in anything 
but chronological order. (This gave rise to a certain 
gentleman's youthful recording to be placed on an Lp after 
his grown up, so one well-known reviewer claimed he had 
sung a couple of songs in falsetto 11) 

The French RCA Victor bravely issued a 24-ip set of Duke 
Ellington's recording over the years for the parent RCA - 
Victor. CBS undertook a similar giant set for Count 
Basie's mammoth output. Whether these sets were intended 
to be limited programmes one doe not know, but they did 
not last long. Name whom you wish, and I believe I am 
correct that all of the really complete collections of an 
individual artist have been released by record companies 
owned or directed by enthusiasts not entirely dependent 
upon the record reissues for their livelihood. Thus I was 
pleased, a generation ago that I bought the complete 
Olympus reissue set of Enrico Caruso recordings on 17 Lps, 
which Ron Phillips organised in between serving on juries. 

In quite a different field, if you like Bing Crosby's work 
you should support the series which J0NZ0 records are 
producing to document his complete commercial 78rpm record 
ings. No project can can succeed without financial 
support from collectors.. Verbal enthusiasm is insufficient. 

In printed matter, the reprinting of the Edison Phonograph 
Monthly booklets in their entirety in bound volumes appears 
to have foundered temporarily because of lack of "cash 
flow". The appearance of each volume depended upon finance 
generated by preceeding sales. It seems that, with 
increased costs of printing, the gap between previous sales 
and new money required widened. These were in limited 
edition, and we are surprised that insufficient collectors 


were keen to support such an interesting and worthwhile 
reprint scheme. Ironically, and sadly, three keen gents who 
were subscribing to 'The Edison Phonograph Monthly' through 
this magazine have died without having the pleasure of 
completing their sets. We still have a few copies of past 
issues here for sale, and can easily arrange for the supply 
of any we do not have. 



197 STRAWBERRY HILL A/ENUE 
STAMFORD, CONNECTICUT 06902 


If you are a jazzfan, we hope that you have heard of Mosaic 
records whose 'logo' and address we show above. Mosaic again 
is a 'small company' possessed by a couple of enthusiasts who 
were tired of the situation where certain trines were reissued 
repeatedly, while others never saw the light of day. 

Michael Cuscuna and Charles Lourie are producing boxed sets 
of Lps pressed on pure vinyl accompanied by excellent 
booklets of notes and photographs taken around the time of 
the recordings, or of the artists while actually recording 
the items in the box. 

Their latest is the most ambitious. A box of 21 Lps reissuing 
all (except four) of the jazz matrices recorded by the 
Keynote company 1941 - 1947. The set includes the issue of 
115 previously unreleased masters, (the four exceptions were 
of a group led by Horace Henderson, of which the masters were 
never released but sold to another company.) 

Previous releases have featured Thelonius Monk (Black Lion) 
Charles Mingus (Candid), Art Pepper and Clifford Brown 
(Pacific), Jerry Mulligan (Pacific & Capitol). From Blue 
Note has come numerous reissues of Thelonius Monk, Albert 
Ammons, Tina Brooks, Ike Quebec , Jolm Hardee, Port of Harlem 
Jazzmen, Sidney Bechet, Art Hodes, Bud Powell, Benny Morton 
Jimmy Hamilton, Ed Hall, James P. Johnson. 

Those we have heard have all been very well transferred with 
no modem tricks. If you are interested, write to Mosaic, 
mentioning this magazine. Each set is complete and defini- 
tive with all remaining takes. 

Histroic Masters Ltd is reissuing 78rpm records pressed 
from original masters. The issue for Feb/March 1987 will 
include five double-sided 10-ich records of items by Melba, 
Chaliapin, dal Monte, Boninsegna and Kurz. I have not heard 
any of this company's products. This set is limited to 300 
sets at £30 per set of five discs plus postage. For details 
write to Stanley Henig, Secretary, Historic Masters Ltd., 

10, Yealand Drive, Lancaster LAI 4EW. 

A new BAUER. We understand that Brian Rust is to work 
upon a revised version of this famous discography of vocal 
recordings of concert and operatic artists. He proposes 
covering the years I896 to 1925 (the end of the acoustic era) 
He would be interested to receive details of anything not 
included in the original 'Bauer', ias well as takes, matrices, 
etc. The new work will cost up to about £20. If interested 
write to Brian Rust, 50 Ulwell Road, Swanage, Dorset BH19 1LN 

Peter Lack of 3 Grosvenor Gardens, London N 10 has had made 
some vinyl pressing from original Phonotype 'metals' of 
recordings by Fernando de Lucia. So far 17 double-sided 
records have been produced, the earlier of which are now in 
very short supply, so we suggest you write for details. Mr. 
Lack can see callers by strict appointment only. We have his 
advertisement elsewhere. 



THE FIRST LIFE GUARDS BAND 


AND GEORGE MILLER 


2079 



For artistic merit and executive efficiency this famous regi- 
mental band undoubtedly holds premier rank - indeed, we quite 
agree with the 'Daily Telegraph* in expressing our own 
conviction, based as it is upon personal appreciation, that 
perhaps only one other in His Majesty's service could with 
any justification be bracketted with it in these respects. 

Its antecedents go far back into the centuries, for we find 
it figuring first in history in 1660. when it headed the 
procession through London on the occasion of the Restoration 
of King Charles II, so that this magnificent band may 
confidently claim to be the oldest, as well as one of the 
best, in the service, and, in all succeeding years this 
renowned group of military instrumentalists has taken a 
prominent place in relation 
to every public State event 
of national and ceremonial 
importance. The utmost 
strength of the 1st. Life 
Guards is restricted to 40 
men, and, in London, is not 
therefore, heard so 
frequently by the general 
public as the larger bands 
of the oot Guards, each 
with a muster of o er 60 men 
but it is otherwise as 
regards the more dicrimin- 
atingly critical audiences 
of the north. At Glasgow, 

Edinburgh, Stockport, 

01dham f Huddersfield, 

Nelson, Northampton, etc. 
where bands are engaged at 
a like strength of 25 or 30, 
no season is allowed to pass 
without in the first place 
arranging for the attendance 
of the celebrated band of 
the 1st. Life Guards. And 
this is certainly not 
surprising, for every mem- 
ber of it is not merely a 
performer of outstanding 
musical culture, but also a 
recognised expert in the 
management of his particular 
instrument, while the 
renditions of the band, as 
a whole, are invariably 
characterised by a marvellous 
concordance of expression, the 
woodwind and the brass being 
in perfect balance and 
equipoise throughout. Under 
the baton of their distin 
distinguished bandmaster, 

Mr. George Miller, L.R.A.M., . Mr. George 

the selections of this band are always full of appeal and 
charm to lovers of instrumental music of a high class, and 
that this affords very ample scope for diversity of tone- 
colour is conclusively demonstrated on the superb records 
produced by the Beka and Scala Companies - records which 
have been so greatly valued and popularity acclaimed in 
all parts of the British Isles. In fact, in the issue of 
their admirable series of selections by the 1st Life Guards 
these companies have conferred an important benefit uponall 
the community, and one which, we have every reason to believe 
has been very generally utilised. For, as a means of bring- 
ing military music before the "million" , the gramophone 
record is unquestionably entitled to take a supreme place. 

It is almost superfluous to say that a military band is what 


its bandmaster makes of it, and in the old and renowned 
career of that of the 1st Life Guards we have proof of this 
in its long succession of eminent conductors, and if its c 
claims to pre-eminence have never been more indisputable 
than they are today, we venture to attribute it to the fact 
that it has never had a more experienced and capable band- 
master than it has now in the person of Mr. George Miller, 
of whom we are pleased to be able to insert an excellent 
photo-portrait. Although still a young man, his career has 
been eventful, as well as successful, and a few particulars 
will be of interest to our readers. 

When only eight years of age he was fortunate enough to 
secure admission into the choir of the Royal Chapel at 

Windsor Castle, where 
from 1886 to 1893, he 
remained under the 
tuition of Sir Walter 
Parratt and his then pup 
pupil, Dr.Walford-Davies . 
During this period his 
exceptional gifts were 
recognised, and he 
finally attained to the 
double dignity of solo 
and head boy. On one 
such occasion, indeed, he 
sang the duet from 
"Lobgesang" with Madame 
Albani, who, at the 
rehearsal, which was held 
in the Waterloo Chamber 
of the State appartments 
was"so delighted with his 
singing that she kissed 
him in evident appreciat- 
ion, During his seven 
years with the Royal 
Choir he sang at all the 
Royal marriages and other 
functions, but in 1893 he 
proceeded to Germany, 
there entering KSnigg- 
liche Kapellmeister 
Aspiralen-Schule , and 
continuing under the mas- 
terly tuition of is 
celebrated Director 
Buchholtz for about a 
couple of years, when he 
returned to England, and 
enlisted in I896, in the 
60th Rifles Regiment. He 
then devoted himself with 
characteristic persisten- 
cy to the cultivation of 
Miller, L.R.A.M. his rare gifts, and, aft 

after passing the requisite examinations, wa3 sent in the 
same year to Kneller Hall, the military training school for 
bandmasters. From that institution he emerged fully 
equipped in November, 1898, and received his first appoint- 
ment as bandmaster to the 32nd. Duke of Cornwall's Light 
Infantry, joining this regiment at Lucknow, and serving 
with it in India for two years, when it was ordered to take 
charge of the Boer isoners in Ceylon. For a further two 
years Mr. Miller remained at that post, the band playing 
twice weekly to lighten the lives of the poor prisoners. 

And these captive Boers were not unthankful, for they made 
many little offerings to Mr. Miller in grateful recognition 
of his kindness. Mr. Miller was, however, not sorry when 
peace was declared in 1902, to accompany his regiment from 



2080 


Ceylon, under orders for Cape Town; but, on the expirat- 
ion of a year, he was called to England to form the newly 
sanctioned Royal Artillery Band at Portsmouth. This work 
he accomplished with conspicuous success, holding the 
position for four years, during which he raised the new 
band to a strength of 52 , capable of acting in the dual 
capacity of orchestral and military instrumentalists. A 
local operatic society - which is still in a flourishing 
condition - was also started under his auspices, and 
under his direction produced 'Rip van Winkle* and the 
•Princess of Kensington*. 

But 1907 was emphatically Mr. George Miller*s 'lucky year* 
for, during its transit from the present to the past, two 
most gracious and fortunate occurrences happened in 
relation to his career. We refer, in the first instance 
to his marriage to the well-known and popular singer, Miss 
Glee son-White, and, in the second place, to his honoured 
preferment to the bandmastership of the 1st. Life Guards - 
the first regiment of the British army. This position 
having then become vacant, Mr. George Miller applied for 
the coveted appointment, and was successful, and we need 
hardly add that he has amply merited his distinction. 

In conclusion, we may mention that this famous military 
band has made some really splendid records for the Beka 
and Scala companies. 

The above was extracted from 'The Sound Wave', 1913# 

****************************** 



Editor's comment = Melodiya records still use the former 
Gramophone Company factory at Riga. Other factories are 
at Leningrad and Moscow, which one presumes are the sites 
of factories from'Imperial'days. We do not know how 
modem pressing is allocated among the factories; it has 
no relationship with music upon them. The Melodiya 
quarterly magazine/ catalogue, a very well-produced item, 
occasionally has articles about old records and labels, 
and artists when reissues are made from them. 
***************************** 

The next Record Bazaar at Wimbledon Stadium will be on 
Sunday 24th May. 'Ordinary* admission from 11.30 a.m. 


* Abeve, the label of a Metropol record by the operatic 

* singer, A. M. Labinsky, a photostat of which was 

* sent by Dr. Georg Moll, as was the letter on p.2106. 

.WANTED WANTED 

, My grandfather, Gottlieb M*ll (1859-1926) was the founder in 
. 1910 of the record factory METROPOL RECORD at Aprelevka 
. (Aprelyevsky), a suburb, of Moscow, which is still used today 
. by Melodiya records. I am looking for any documents and our 
, old records. Can someone help me? I am also interested to 
. read of old record factories in the Soviet Union, and the 
, Gramophone Company's 'Red label' records there. 

. Dr. Georg Moll, Roesoll, 13, 2305 Heikendorf, Germany. 


BAND 

We have received another batch of fine military and brass band recordings from Bandleader 
records, which specialise in them. We note that the major proportion of these digitally 
recorded Lps were done via Sony equipment at the CBS studios. 

In numerical order, we have received, BND 1021 The Royal Artillery Band "Call for the guns"; 

BND 1022 The Band of the Life Guards "Boots and Saddles"; BND 1023 The Band of the Corps of 
Royal Engineers "Engineers Everywhere", BND 1024 The Band of the Welsh Guards and The London 
Concert Artists "Gulbert & Sullivan with Band and Voice"; BND 1025 Regimental Band of the 1st. 
Battalion The Parachute Regiment "Airborne Warrior"; BND 1026 The Regimental Band of the ^6th/ 
5th The Queen's Royal Lancers "Forward of the Line"; The Band of the Royal Airforce Regiment 
"Magnificent Men"; The Royal Artillery Orchestra "Marching Strings"; BND 2009 The Royal 
Doulton Band" Festival Fanfare". 

The Royal Artillery Band and the R. A, Orchestra are both conducted by Major F.A. Renton, 

The Regiment had had fifes and drums in the 16th. Century, but a band was formerly established 
in 1762, the musicians, then as now, having to play both wind and stringed instruments. The 
Band is entirely wind, but the Orchestra, of course, includes both, demonstrating is dual 
quality in such as Victor Herbert's 'March of the toys*. Sousa's »E1 Capitan* is returned to 
its original theatre-setting becoming a piece of fun. Also from the theatre comes 'Seventy-six 
Trombones', which, like many pieces on both records, in very interesting arrangements. Coming 
orchestrally, *0b-la-di, 0b-la-da', of course minus the Beatles vocal antics, is a pleasant 
piece. 'The entry of the Boyar ds' and the medley of Folk Songs sound fresh in these recordings. 
Even before the invention of records, Bands took great music across the countryside of many 
nations where it might not otherwise be heard. Major Renton has done excellently with his 
setting of 'The Force of Destiny' overture. Fields' 'Nocturne* has a very satisfying arrange- 
ment in modem idiom by C.E .Hicks. As of old 'Lucy Long* provides a base for bassoon gymnastics 
by Alex Kane. As well as"traditional" marches like'Blaze away', 'Washington Post','Le Pere La 
Victoire' , we have a sparkling rendition of the music from the sparkling show 'Bamum' . 

The Royal Engineers record is divided, side one being military music and the other is concert 
music. The marches range from the 101 year old 'Old Comrades* by Carl Teike, which is difficult 
to beat (\\) through Kenneth Alford's 'Colonel Bogey* and Pryce's 'Iron Regiment* (I 963 ) to 
the same composer's 'First Post* (1982). The concert-side includes a fine version of the 'Poet 
and Peasant* overture played with great precision - I especially like the waltz section. i/CPL 
Christopher Ellis gives a vituoso trumpet solo performance in 'Brazilience* . The conductor is 
Major D, E. Pryce. 

Major J. G. McColl conducts the Life Guards in a varied programme which includes his own strong 
slow march 'Agrippa* featuring the trumpeters. I hadn't realised previously that the famous 


LEADER 

slow march of the Life Guards was composed by Queen Victoria's mother, The Duchess of 
Kent. A stirring version of one of my favourite marches "Washington Grays" by Grafulla is 
given with great precision. There is a brilliant arrangement of Lecuona's 'Malaguena'. The 
•Msorside March* by Gustav Holst and 'Toccata for Band* (Erikson) test the band's ability to 
enfuse light and shade as well as rhythm. In modern vein is 'Trumpets on top*. 

The London Concert Artists are directed by Jennifer Partridge and the Welsh Guards Band by 
Major Derek Taylor. The Band is heard solo for the 'Yeoman of the Guard' overture and the 
hornpipe from 'Ruddigore'. Having seen and heard the Gilbert & Sullivan operas many times 
over the years, find that this record contains 15 of the favourite "songs" from the most - 
performed operas. Nearly all arrangements are by Major Taylor, and one cannot single out a 
tune as superior, all being so well performed. I am sure that anyone wanting a "selection" 
of G & S will find this a happy addition to the collection. 

The Parachute Regiment Band's Bandmaster Mr. R. A, Ely wrote 'Airborne Warrior*, march, 
specially for this recording - and a good one it is too.- as are his 'Golden Lanyard', 
'Holmegaard' , and 'Snowcat', the latter a concert march. The Band includes Eddie Muddiman 
who is also a classical guitarist, and whose beautiful playing is featured in 'Cavatina* by 
Myers. Mr. Ely's playful arrangement of Sousa's 'King Cotton' shows him to be very imaginat 
ive - yet respectful! This recording was (excellently) made by portable equipment in the 
Garrison Church, Bulford, where the Band is stationed, during 1985, so side 2 being made 
around the 40th. anniversary of peace in Europe is a commemoration in music - film, secular, 
religious, and martial. It includes 'Prayer for The Fallen' spoken by Rev. J. Symonds. All 
very well done. 

Now to a brass band. The Royal Doulton Band, conducted by Ted Gray, which was recorded in 
1986 during the National Garden Festival held in Stoke On Trent. This band is sponsored by 
the famous china company Royal Doulton, and listening to this record one can easily hear why 
in only 13 years of existence it has achieved dianpion status among the brass bands of this 
country. Frem a beautiful comet solo by Nigel Cavill, 'My love is like a red, red rose*, 
it slips easily into a jaunty 'Tip Toe through the Tulips* . There are some fine soloists- 
Clive Membury (Euphonium) 'Watching the wheat', Michael Hilton (tenor horn) 'Serenade to 
Peace', Ian Mould (Eb bass) The merry old gardener, 'Country Gardens* is given a slightly 
modem rhythm, while David Cunninghams 'Heritage of the Potteries' shows the band in fine 
form with a slow and reflective piece - as it is in 'Tranquility* , Brass band enthusiasts 
should add this to their collections. 

To be continued. 


THE COMING and DEMISE of the MARATHON RECORDS and MACHINES 


2081 


by FRANK 

To present a full account of the two National Gramophone com- 
panies and some of their personnel, with reference to their 
Marathon Records and Machines, one needs some knowledge of 
former businesses within the talking machine industry which 
operated in, and from, Great Britain. 

I have insufficient knowledge about the machine side of the 
National Gramophone companies to write in depth on that sub- 
ject but the origin of the recording side of the businesses 

1 can trace back through Percy J. Packman. 

Percy J. Packman, a piccolo player, as early as 1891 had 
placed an advertisement in "Bazaar, Exchange and Mart", as 
"The Gramophone", and although his name was not given his 
address was, which was at Brook Green, Hammersmith, London W. 
The machine and records he was advertising were the German 
"E. Berliner's Grammophon" products, produced for, and by, 
Hammer und Reinhardt & Co.'s "Grammophon Fabrik" of Waite rs- 
hausen, in Thuringia, Germany. 

The next thing I know of Packman was that he was a partner 
in the firm of "Lucock & Packman", the recorders and whole- 
salers of "Pioneer Records" and suppliers of cylinder blanks. 
The Pioneer cylinder records first appeared in 1901 and must 
have been in infringement of the Edison Bell Consolidated 
Phonograph Co., Ltd.'s patents unless produced under licence. 

William Maitland Lucock left the business in 1903, which had 
been established at 62. Uxbridge Road, Shepherds Bush,London 
W. (a few hundred yars north of where Packman had been living 
in 1891) hut had since moved to 149-153 Roseberry Avenue, 
London E.C.. Soon after moving, the Company was registered 
as a private limited company, in Becember, 1903. Already 
familiar with lateral "cut" disc records. Packman was now 
both a recording engineer and a recording artist having made 
both solo piccolo recordings and in duet with a Mr. H. D. 
Nesbit on the "Pioneer Records". He was also the Managing 
Director. A.W. Cameron, described as another Phonograph 
record maker, was the company secretary and a director, and 
R. Stewart, described as a chemist and record maker, was the 
company's Chairman. 

By lOth.Qotober, 1904, when Dr. William Michaelis's Neophone 
Syndicate had been transformed into Neophone Limited,. Percy 
Packman, then described as a musician and recording expert, 
had become the recording manager for Neophone Ltd. . 

A.W. Cameron, was a director of Neophone Ltd.. Although 
this company's registered office was in Philpot Lane, London 
E.C., its trading address was the same as Pioneer Records in 
Roseberiy Avenue - in fact, from this time onwards, the 
Pioneer Records became somewhat of a backnumber in favout of 
the new Neophone Disc Phonograph Records and machines. The 
last mention of the Pioneer Records I have found was publish- 
ed in March, 1905. 

A.W, Cameron became the Managing Director of Neophone, Ltd. 
and continued in a like capacity for the succeeding Neophone 
(1905), Ltd. which c h anged its corporate name to Neophone 
Limited and moved to Worship Street, London, E. C. in Decem- 
ber, 1905. 

H. D. Nesbit, who had recorded piccolo duets with Packman on 
the Pioneer Records, became the Musical Director for Neophone 
Limited. 

In November, 1 906 , P.J. Packman, advertising from 

2 Tabernacle Street, London E.C., which was adjoining 
Neophone's premises, had a quantity of master cylinders for 
sale, also some duplicating machines, some of which would 
duplicate concert-size cylinders down to standard-size cylin- 
ders. 

By April, 1907, Packman, Cameron and Nesbit had parted from 
Neophone Limited. Constantin Craies had become the Managing 
Director, and under a voluntary winding up resolution , had 


ANDREWS 

become the company's liquidator since February 1907, but he 
was replaced in March. Neophone's business was sold to the 
General Phonograph Co,, Ltd. in 1907. 

The Neophone Disc Phonograph Records of vertical cut, with 
a D-shaped tracking groove, were continued by the new 
proprietors until November, 1907. 

MUS0GRAM LIMITED 

By this time, P. J. Packman, with A.W. Cameron and a Mfc. 
Harry Hinks-Martin, also formerly with Neophone Limited, had 
founded a new company, on 5th. June, 1907, called "Musogram 
Limited". This company was to manufacture disc recordings 
and gramophones. The Chariman of this new company was Mr. 
Siebert Colburn Hart who had been the Neophone Agent 
for countries on the African continent. Mr. Harry Hinks - 
Martin, the Managing Director, had earlier been with the 
Edison Bell businesses and the Gramophone and Typewriter, Ltd. 
Percy Packman was to be chief recorder. 

By June, 1908, the headings of Musogram Ltd. showed it to 
have branches throughout the world similar to those belonging 
to Neophone Ltd. before its business had been purchased by 
the General Phonograph Co., Ltd. and, judging by the lack of 
information concerning any trading activity by Musogram Ltd. 
in Britain since its founding in June, 1907, it would appear 
that the company had concentrated its efforts upon trading 
overseas. 

The earliest mention of any of its records which I have found 
is from the American publication "Talking Machine World" of 
November, 1907, which reported that its London office had 
received a list of 12-inch diameter "Musogram Records". 
Musogram Reoerds , Like the Neophone discs, were vertically 
cut with a U-shaped tracking channel. Neophones had their 
last issues in October, 1907,in Britain. 

In June, 1908, came a report that Musogram Limited had 
published a catalogue in seven languages other than English, 
giving prices in the currencies of the languages of the 
countries for which the catalogues had been printed. Were 
these for the International Neophone Co. formed in February, 

1907 ? 

Musogram Limited increased its capitalisation from £3,000 
to i£10,000 in August, 1908, and in October, published a 12- 
page machine catalogue when the company was stated to be 
carrying on a "considerable foreign trade". With the 
International Neophone Company ? Was it still in business 
at that time? 

I have found nothing more about Musogram Limited, with its 
machines and records, in the trade magazines until April, 
1909. In the meanwhile the company had reached an Agree- 
ment with an undiscovered party, on 25th. January, I909. 

This may have been with Mr. Cheers, of Hounslow, Middlesex, 
who was operating a disc record pressing business under the 
style of Irolite Manufacturing Company, at Inverness Works 
there, and who is known to have pressed "Musogram Records" 
later. 

Should my surmise be incorrect, it is still a fact that, by 
April, 1909, Musogram Limited had announced a new type of 
12-inch diameter vertical cut disc with its spiral groove 
pitched at 96 grooves t° the inch to give a playing time of 
up to nine minutes per side. A new machine, "The Musogram" 
was to be manufactured especially developed to play those 
new Musogram Records. Work, if any, for the International 
Neophone Company had ended, that firm having ceased trading. 

By October, 1909, both 12-inch and 10i -inch Musogram discs 
were on sale with duration frlaying. times then given as of 8 
minutes and 5 minutes per side respectively. The speed at 
which to play the records was given as 75 rpm. Later 78 


4 Musically, 1913 has been a Marathon year. 

[ I ^ The high artistic merit of these records — their 
surprising accuracy in detail ; the judgment dis- 
played in the selection of lists, and the unique merit of records them- 
selves which play “ T wice as Long ” and give complete, for the first 
time on one disc, the longest and most beautiful overtures, note for note 
as they were written and as they were intended to be heard — has 
placed these records right at the front. Our February List should 
be studied as an augury of what is to follow during 1914. Watch 
the Marathon ! 


OPERA IN 
ENGLISH. 

Herbert Heyner 

12-INCH 
No. 2051. 

Star of Eve — 

Tannhauser 

Even Bravest 
Heart — Faust 


J7AVOURITE operatic 
excerpts in English, 
grandly sung by the 
eminent baritone, Mr. 
Herbert Heyner. His 
phrasing of both numbers 
is in every way worthy 
his great reputation, and 
the beautiful quality of 
his voice throughout can- 
not fail to appeal to all 
lovers of the very best in 
the vocal art. 


YOU MADE 
ME LOVE 
YOU. 

Elevated to a classic 

Miss Ida Jones 
and 

Mr. Gerald Hazard 


10-INCH 
No. 401. 

r J^H ERE arc no two songs 
which enjoy a wider 


THE NATIONAL 
GRAMOPHONE 
CO. (1913) LTD. 

15-17, CITY ROAD, 
LONDON . . . E.C. 


A double-page advertisement 



83 


William Tell 
Overture 
COMPLETE 

12-INCH 
No. 2046 

^EVER before has it been pos- 
sible to give this most popular 
of all operatic preludes complete on 
one record, and as a recording 
achievement this wonderful disc, 
therefore, mast stand alone. And 
not only is every note of the Overture 
given exactly as originally written, 
but it is played with a wealth of 
expression which reflects the greatest 
possible credit upon our military 
combination, the National Guards 
Band. Whether in the beautiful 
opening movement ; in the vigour of 
“ The Storm *’ ; the plaintive sweet- 
ness of “ The Calm ** ; or the 
brilliant “ Finale,” the interpretation 
is above reproach, and no admirer of 
this world-famous Overture can 
afford to overlook this superb disc. 


The 

“ Evening News ” 
TANGO. 

10-INCH. 

No. 383. 

STEPHEN HAMILTON’S 
“Evening News” Tango is 
rapidly pushing its way into popular 
tavour, and is certainly a choice 
example of this fascinating dance 
measure. It is here mated with 
Henry Wood’s “Up-to-date (1913) 
Barn Dance,” which is founded 
upon the popular melodies : — “ My 
Little Persian Rose’’; “The Wed- 
ding Glide ” ; How do you do, Miss 
Ragtime ? ” ; “ When the Midnight 
Choo Choo leaves for Alabam,” 
and “ Gaby Glide,’’ A brilliant 
record in every way, played by the 
National Guards Band. 


popularity than these — “Take 
me in your arms, - ' and " You 
made me love you," The 
latter is the star number in 
practically every pantomime, 
and is being whistled every- 
where. They are here sung 
as a duet by Miss Ida Jones, 
who possesses a beautiful 
soprano voice, and Mr. 

Gerald Hazard. A record 

which will immediately take 
its place as the ” standard 
rendering of these all-popular 
numbers.’’ 


NEARLY 
30 
HITS 
ON ONE 
DISC. 

M EARLY thirty hits 
^ on one disc, surely 
an extraordinary achieve- 
ment ! Yet such is the 
fact on 12-inch discs No. 
2050 is found the 
“London Revue 
Lancers,” based on all the 
most popular airs from 
London's leading tevues 
played by the National 


Guards Band. The Set 
is given complete with 
pauses and introductory 
bars to each figure, thus 
rendering it ideal for 
dancing purposes. Some 
of the items introduced 
are as follows : — “ Oh 
1 do love you my Orange 
Girl/' “ Way down 
South,’* “ Ragging the 
Baby to Sleep,” " It’s 
nice when you love a wee 
lassie,” “ Hitchy Koo/’ 
“ Hold your hand out,’* 
“ Row, Row, Row/’ 
“Jerry Jerem i ah/* 
“ Waiting for the Robert 
E. Lee.” ** The trail of 
the Lonesome Pine,’’ and 
many others. 




% 


an 





2084 

rpm discs were made. Specially mounted sapphire styli, at 
Is. 6d. each were required to play the records. Patented 
adaptors at 2s. 6d.each were made for any disc machine, 
except Columbia graphophones for which the adaptor cost 8s. 
6d. at first, being reduced to 4s. 6d. each by May, 1910, 
having been 6s, 6d. in March. 

In march, records labelled as "Musogran Living Records - 
Musone Process", were introduced to sell with the "Musogram" 
Long Process Records", the last reference to which, with 
titles and artists, were advertised in May, 1910. 

In June, 1910, it was reported that Packman was developing a 
fine-thread, verical-cut disc which was to be played with 
steel needles but, four months later, in October, another 
report informed that he had left Musogram Limited and had 
been a founding member of a new company with the name of 
"The Sound Reproduction Syndicate" whose objective was to 
take recordings for the trade and the making of galvanos on 
a new and improved principle for both vertical and lateral- 
cut recordings^ and also for the synchronisation to kinemat- 
ographic films. It was this Syndicate that provided the 
basis upon which the National Gramophone Company, Limited 
was established on 5th, June, 1911. 

THE NATIONAL GRAMOPHONE 

COMPANY, LIMITED - 1911 & 1912 

A public company, the National Gramophone Co., Ltd. was 
certificated to begin business on 3rd. August, 1911, having 
purchased the Sound Reproduction Syndicate business for 
£3» 300 with its Packman patents which were protected over- 
seas in Austria, Belgium, France and Germany and with an 
application pending in U. S, A. . Messrs P. J. Packman, 

James Albert Corey and Walter Amelius Cloud, the members of 
the Syndicate^ became the directors of the new company, 
joined by Robert Crawford Lees of Holt, Lees & Co. of Cheap- 
side, London E.C., (a business which sold pirated Fonotipia 
and red-labelled "H.M.V." recordings imported from Russia) 
and by Walter Hansen Rawles, a chemical engineer, associated 
with Lettrophones Limited. 

The Agreement under which the National Gramophone Co., Ltd. 
was established was signed on behalf of the company by 
Jonathan Lewis Young, B.Sc, M.I.T J!.. Mr. J. L. Young had 
been the manager and partner in Col. G. Gouraud's "Edison 
Phonograph Company" which had been established in London in 
1888. Young had left this pioneering and popularising 
phonograph company in 1890 when the Edison United Phonograph 
Company of Newark, New Jersey, took control. From then on 
Young found himself on the outside of the phonograph industry 
in Britain as an infringer of patents, having to shut down 
his own "Phonograph Office" by the end of 1893, by which time 
he had established The World's Phonograph Company in 
Amsterdam, Holland. Young became involved in the talking 
machine industry in London again once the primary patents had 
expired and he was self-employed in his own business when the 
Sound Reproduction Syndicate had been formed. 

In order to establish the National Gramophone Co., Ltd. Percy 
Packman had sent J. L, Young examples of. his new recordings 
and Young's assessment, in a letter to Packman, dated 9th May 
1911, was used to promote the new company. Young wrote in the 
following terms: - 

"Dear Sir:- I have been in the phonograph and gramophone 
business for a great many years and I have handled every 
class of record and machine that has been brought out. In 
my opinion the recording process used in the making of your 
record is a great advance on what has been done before. The 
system lends itself to better definition, more natural repro- 
duction and a very long record with great wearing powers. In 
my judgement the records made by your system will be heartily 
welcomed by the Trade and I see a prosperous future for any 
concern which will handle the business." 

(signed) J.Lewis Young B.Sc., M.I.T *E. 


Six days later, C. R. "Johnny" Johnston, one of the pioneer 
demonstrators and recorders of the former Edisen Phonograph 
Company of 1888, (he had recorded Lord Tennyson and Florence 
Nightingale among others) also wrote to Packman, he too 
having been sent sample records for his examination. Dated 
15th May, 1911, Johnston's letter reads :- 
"Dear Sir, 

I have listened very carefully to the records 
you submitted to me made under your "new process recording" 
and can unhesitatingly say that for tone, quality and 
natrualness they are the most perfect reproductions I have 
ever heard. Though the above very essential qualities are 
so marked, there is, at the same time, greater volume than in 
any other record I know of and, speaking as I do with very 
many years in the service of sound recording, I must 
heartily congratulate your company on having attained such 
magnificent results as those I have heard." 

(signed) 

C.R.Johnston, Recording Manager to the Edison Bell Consoli- 
dated Phonograph Co., Ltd. and Records expert since the 
inception of the Talking Machine Industry in the U.K.. 

Johnston's letter, too, was used in the promotion of the 
National Gramophone Co., Ltd., in June, 1911. This new 
company advertised that it was to introduce a 10— inch diam- 
eter record in the Autumn of 1911, out in the vertical mode 
but with Percy J. Packman's new idea of a recording head 
being provided with a "v" shaped cutting tool. Having a 
play-back speed of 80 rpm the play-back needle was to touch 
the bottom of the groove and not the walls of the track, as 
■in the laterally-cut discs of others. The records were to 
be priced at 2s. 6d. each . The patents involved were 
Packman's of 15th. October, 1909, No. 23644, for an improved 
'hill-and-dale' cut record and the method of making same, and 
16641 of 1911. The records failed to appear in the autumn. 

The registration of the name of the National Gramophone 
Company Limited caused great concern to the Edison phonograph 
business in London, as its own corporate name was the 
National Phonograph Co., Ltd. which was already referred to by 
many in the trade as the "National" company. Another confus- 
ing factor was that discs were already circulating labelled 
"National Double Sided Records", which was to prevent the 
National Gramophone Co., Ltd. from calling its discs National 
Records . 

George Croydon Marks, the attorney for 7 the Edison interests 
in London, wrote asking the National Gramophone Company, Ltd. 
to change its corporate name style to something less 
confusing. This being refused, G.C .Marks caused a Writ to be 
issued against this new company which also included the 
production of cylinder records and phonographs in its Mem*- 
randa and Articles of Association. The Writ was served on 
21st. December, 1911. By 24th January, 1912, it was known 
that the National Gramophone Co., Ltd. still refused to alter 
its name and that it had obtained the services of eminent 
Counsel to defend its position. The National Phonograph 
Company, Ltd. was going to use the argument that since it had 
been recording discs in London and its associated company in 
U. S. A. had also been doing so. and pressing the same, that 
they were also entitled to be known as the National Gwuno — 
phone Company in Britain, especially, as it claimed, everyone 
in the trade in Britain referred to its business as the 
"National" . 

Affadavits from leading persons and firms in the trade were 
submitted by both plaintiff and defendant but, eventually, on 
12th. April, 1912, upon legal advice, the Edison business 
withdrew its motion and subsequently changed its own name to 
Thos. A. Edison, Ltd., in August, 1912, thus following the 
Edison business in the U. S. A. which had a similar name 
change a year earlier. 

As remarked, records promised to be issued "in two or three 
weeks* time", in September, 1911» bad failed to appear. In 
March, 1912, the National Gramophone Co.Ltd. moved from its 


13A, New Street Hill, E, C. premises, where it had been 

founded, to 15-17# City Road, E.C, with new recording rooms. 
After the withdrawal of the Edison Writ in April, the company 
announced its "Marathon Records" in May and it applied for 
its trade mark to be registered, which showed a soundbox with 
ears. 

The company's soundbox, essential for playing the "Marathon 
Records", was advertised in July, 1912, at the priceof five 
shillings . This was the month when the first list of records 
was printed. Numbers 101 to 117 were 10-inch diameter, priced 
at 2s, 6d. each, with a claimed playing duration of up to 
five minutes for each side - hence the name "Marathon" - a 
long runner 1 . An adaptor to be fitted to other makes of sound 
boxes, costing 2s, 6d. enabled the Marathon Records to be 
played on all disc machines. 

In November, 1912, the first of the 12-inch diameter Marathon 
Records was advertised, number 12-2001 with a playing time 
oi 7 minutes per side and priced at four shillings. By this 
time the demand for Marathon Records had been so large that 
the October list had been delayed for two weeks and t» have 
the November issues ready for 4th, November the factory press 
ing the discs had been compelled to work all day and night 
continuously, 

After having been on sale for six months the first complete 
catalogue of Marathon Records became available in December, 
1912, which then comprised six 12-inch discs and ninety-five 
10-inch discs. 

During November and December, 1912, the decision had been 
taken to increase the company's capitalisation from £6,000 
to £25,000 but this idea was abandoned in favour of establish 
ing a new company to run the business, 

THE NATIONAL GRAMOPHONE COMPANY ( 1 91 3 ), LIMITED. 1 913-1 91 5 

No prospectus was printed for the new company which was 
established on 2nd. January, 1913# as The National Gramophone 
Company (1913) Limited. At the same time a German company 
was in process of formation in which the British company 
would have a controlling interest and negotiations were also 
in hand for the sale of the French and American rights which 
would bring to the new company £42,000 in royalty from the 
French rights and £60,000 from the American rights. 

The new company was deemed to have taken over the business in 
Marathon Records and machines from the former company as from 
31st. December, 1912. Only two directors from the earlier 
company joined the Board of the new; Messrs J. A. Corey and 
W. H. Rawles. Four additional directors included Thomas 
Beecham, a director of the Covent Garden Opera Co., Ltd., 
Reginald Mortimer, a director of White, Tomlins & Courage, Ltd 
C. B, Elkington, a director of Elkington & Co., Ltd. - silver 
smith, and Edward Houghton, who resigned in favour of Rawles, 
who did not join until February, 1913. 

The business changed hands at a purchase price of £165,000 as 
to £15,000 in cash and the rest as paid-up shares in the new 
company to the stockholders in the company taken-over,with 
some shares held in reserve under an option. This new 
company claimed to have a factory equipped 'for the manufac- 
ture of machines and accessories and was in possession of 
plant to undertake all its British business . The earlier com- 
pany, whose business only really became established in the 
last three months of 1 912 had made a profit of £5,441 nett, 
which was said to be an earning rate of £21,000 nett profit 
per annum. 

To play the new 12-inch size Marathon Records, a special, fine 
grade, steel needle was manufactured costing one shilling for 
a box of 100 needles. A "Medium" tone needle, this was 
expected to play four 10-inch Marathons, or two 12-inch Mara- 
thons. Ordinary Marathon needles were sold as "Loud" or 
■Soft" tone, and cost eightpence for 200. 


2085 

During the eactly part of 1913# Mr. A. 0. Bunnett, a repre- 
sentative of the National Gramophone Co., Ltd., on behalf of 
the Manager, Mr. A. N. Gray, had been visiting meetings *f 
various Gramophone and Phonograph societies, which had been 
in process of formation during the previous year or so, at 
which he demonstrated the new Marathon Records and machines. 

Soon after the National Gramophone Co. (1913)# Ltd. had been 
founded, he visited the Northampton Talking Machine Society 
on 21st. January, 1913. This Society had been formed by 
Mr. R. P. Wykes, a dealer and factor at the Arcade Emporium 
in Northampton Town, he being the sole agent for Marathon 
Records in that area. A Concert of Marathon Records was 
given by this Society on that 21st. January, at which Mr. 
Bunnett was the visiting guest instead of Mr. Gray, who 
could not attend. At this meeting Mr. Bunnett read aloud 
a letter from Mr. Gray which, inter alia, had the following 
in its contents. - - 

"The Marathon Record is the latest . . and the greatest 
achievement in sound recording and is worthy of a more 
than casual attention. Since Dr. Berliner, in 1887, 
first invented the Gramophone many of the world's 
greatest scientific and meohanical experts have devoted 
their attention to the improvement of this "germ" idea 
... But it remained for Mr. P. J. Packman to evolve an 
improved and satisfactory system of recording sounds on 
wax discs in such a manner that it could be reproduced 
by means of a steel needle. 

"Packman's patent system is really a combination of the 
forms of sound recording extant on discs, namely, the 
needle or Berliner cut and the Phono* cut. In the 
Berliner system the recording stylus cuts a groove, *V' 
shaped in cross section, with the arms of the groove 
varying in width at the top hence, in recording under 
this system, there had to be a considerable space between 
the grooves: scientifically expressed 'the amplitude of 
the sound varies as the width of the track' . With phono 
cut, on the contrary, a 'U' shaped cutting stylus is used 
hence a 'U' shaped track is secured but, inasmuch as the 
whole of the track is taken up by the impression, even 
here there is a variation in the width of the impression 
of the track. At the same time the amplitude of the 
sound depends on the depth of the impressions. 

"Packman's invention consists of cutting a groove, 'V' 
shaped in cross section, of a uniform width throughout, 
the sound impressions being engraved at the bottom of the 
groove ... the reproducing needle runs on a perfectly 
straight line along the track and is not thrown from side 
to side as in "Berliner" records; hence a notable reduct- 
ion in surface scratch of Marathon Records, Secondly, the 
needle, having no lateral or side to side motion, the 
needle is freer to follow the minute convolutions at the 
bottom of the record track, hence the Marathon Record is 
remarkable for its reproduction. 

"Thirdly, inasmuch as the track is of constant and known 
width, it is possible to place the sound grooves very 
close together, hence the Marathon Record is much longer 
than any other existing record ... the longest 10-inch 
Marathon Record yet placed on sale is N0.I63 which 
carries 11 minutes of music for both sides. A complete 
set of Lancers, with pauses between the figures, is given 
on this disc. Figures 1, 2 & 3 occupy 5 minutes 20 sec- 
onds, while figures 4 and 5 occupy 5 minutes 40 seconds 
to play though at a speed of 80 rpm. 

"Our longest playing 12-inch record at present is the 
PBoet and Peasant Overture', No. 12-2002, which carries 
7 minutes 15 seconds of music, (on one side- F. A.) 

"You will, perhaps, be interested to hear that . . the 
limits of possibility under the system are by no means 
reached. For example, in No. 1 63 the walls of the 
grooves are still more than twice the thickness as the 



2086 

width of the track which will give you some idea of the 
fineness of the grooves.". 

During the evening of 21st January, 1913, one of the 
"Mammoth" horns was used with a Marathon machine to demons- 
trate the records played over. 

During that January the £1 shares of the business were being 
quoted on the Stock Exchange at £9. 

A complete catalogue of Marathon Records came from the new 
company dated 1st. February, 1913. This was provided with a 
•thumb index* on the bottom of its pages. 

In March, 1913, H. H, Anderson, formerly with the Gramophone 
Co., Ltd. of Hayes, Middlesex, joined the National Gramophone 
Co. (1913), Ltd. as its Sales Manager, and he produced 
another complete Marathon Records catalogue in 1913. 

For anyone purchasing over £1 worth of Marathon Records from 
2nd June, 1913, there was the free offer of any style of 
Marathon Sound Box. For over 15 shillings' worth of records 
there was the offer of a free, type 'D* adaptor, and for over 
ten shillings* worth there was offered a choice of an adaptor 
from models 'A*, *B * and * C * . These offers were to terminate 
on 31st August.). 

All Marathon Records were sold under strict price maintenance 
regulations. The free offer schemes were extended to 31st. 
October at the beginning of the new 1913-1914 season, when 
another new complete catalogue of Marathon Records was pub- 
lished. Schubert* "Unfinished Symphony" was issued on a 
single 12-inch Marathon Record in the October list. 

A Marathon Machine catalogue was also published in October, 

1913, having a "thumb index" for various sections of the 
catalogue and a full titles index in the sub-sections, (which 
would seem to indicate that recordings were also included 
especially as photographs of Marathon recording artists were 
also printed. 

At that time a rumour was circulating that the Marathon Gramo 
phone Co. (1913), Ltd. was about to issue a long-playing 
Marathon Record which would sell for only one shilling. 

This was probably fed by the fact that most major companies 
had brought out their shilling or one-shilling-and-a-penny 
records in time for the new season. 

For the second year in succession the Marathon Records 
carried recordings made by the Winning band at the Brass Band 
Festival Competition held at the Crystal Palace each year 
since 1900. In 1912 it had been the St. Hilda Colliery Band. 
In the current year, 1913, it was the Irwell Springs Band. 

The free offer of sound-boxes and adaptors was extended to 
the close of the year. 

Issued in November, 1913, Marathon Record 12-2042 had a total 
duration playing time of 16 minutes 25 seconds, with Thomas 
F. Kinniburgh, bass, singing four songs. This length of play 
ing time was unequalled by any other company's record and was 
twice as long as the standard 12-inch diameter discs. And 
the longest playing 10-inch disc was issued in the December 
list, No.388, having a total playing time of 12| minutes. 

The company experienced a financial crisis- in the early part 
of 1914, with monies being raised by mortgage debentures in 
April, May and June. Four directors resigned in July, 1914, 
including Mr. Thomas Beecham. With three new directors the 
company began re-advertising in the trade press in September, 

1914, and issued a circular to the trade stating that it was 
still in business but, for the 1914-1915 season, intended to 
sell only the same machine models as they had previously. 
With the I9I 4-1 91 8 war in its opening phases, the company 
felt it necessary to emphasise that its Marathon Records 
were entirely British Made. 

W, Meyorwitz, who had been the musical director for Marathon 


Records for the past two years retired at this time to 
become musical director for Joseph O'Hara's Opera Company 
for whom he was to produce "Tristan und Isolde" and "Madama 
Butterfly" . 

In November, 1914, Percy J. Packman, himself, demonstrated 
his Marathon Records at a meeting of the North London Phon- 
PhCnOgraph and Gramophone Society when some imported 
Edison Diamond Discs were also demonstrated and compari- 
sons made. That same month it was reported that at a Bread 
and Cake Manufacturers* convention, held in Winnipeg, Canada 
the members heard a fifteen minute address reproduced from 
a Marathon Record especially recorded for that event. 

Following upon Packman's demonstration to the North London 
Society, the members paid a visit to the National Gramo- 
phone Co. (1913) Ltd recording studios in the City Road in 
February, 1915. 

In March, 1915* a Receiver was appointed to take charge of 
the business under the terms of a trust deed of 7th.May, 
1914, to secure £6,000 of Debenture stock. J. A. Scott was 
appointed on 15th. March, and another Receiver, in A. N. 
Gray, the manager, was apointed on 25th. March. 

The last new additions to the Marathon Records catalogue 
had been issued at the beginning of March, 1915* although 
a few dealers were still advertising them during the summer 

of 1915. 

J. V. E. Taylor, one of the new directors of the company 
wrote to the Registrar of Joint Stock Companies, asking 
that the National Gramophone Co.(19l3)*Ltd. should be 
struck from the register explaining that the assets of the 
company had been seized by the first debenture holders 
shortly after the War had begun and that these had since 
been realised with the sanction of the Courts and the Com- 
pany, and had thus been obliged to cease doing business. 
There had been a loss of £11,076- 11s - 3d. up to the 30th 
April, 1914, and a Receiver and Manager had been appoin- 
ted by the Mortgage Investment & Contract Corporation, Ltd. 

The Receiver's report showed that the company had done 
business with the Float Electric Company for sound-boxes 
and had other business dealings with J. E. Hough, Ltd. 
(Edison Bell), with the Endolithic Manufacturing Co., Ltd. 
and its associated company the Crystalate Manufacturing Co. 
Ltd. and with the Clarion Record Co., Ltd.. 

The assets had been put up as an Auction Sale by Tender, the 
tenders having to be submitted by 12 noon on Saturday 12th. 
August, 1915. The assets were as one lot, including the 
letters patent for Great Britain, Argentina, Austria, Italy, 
Belgium, Brazil, Canada, France, Germany, India and Spain; 
the registered designs for the sound-boxes which could be 
used on both lateral and vertical cut discs; about 1,000 
master records and about 30,000 finished Marathon Records. 
The recording plant, with heating cabinets and other 
apparatus was also included. 

It would appear that then, or later, the Orchestrelle Co., 
Ltd., of London, acquired some or all of those assets. 

The company itself was not struck from the register of 
Joint Stock Companies until 30th. March, 1917* 

In November, 1915* "The Phono' Trader" was given to under- 
stand that the destinies of the "Marathon" company had been 
provided for in the future, and although the records with 
the Packman cut might not be sold under their usual name, 
that periodical believed that the business was to be 
re-developed as a factoring proposition. 

Another Report, of December, 1915* said that the assets of 
the National Gramophone Co. (1913)* Ltd. had been purchased 
and the business was to be resuscitated with records 
selling at Is. 6d. for 10-inch discs and 2s, 6d. for 12-in 


discs. Nothing more was heard of this. 

A record with plain white labels both marked "Sample Phono' 
Record" and dated 3rd. October, 1916, has been collected 
and the matrices show this disc to have been pressed from 
the earlier demised Marathon Records. 

Now it is known that the Orchestrelle Co., Ltd. of London 
revealed at the beginning of 1917» that it had opened 
recording laboratories in Chiswell Street, Lendon E.C., 
where a trio of recording experts were at work under Percy 
J. Packman. The other two being C. R. 'Johnny 1 Johnston 
and a Mr. ftuirck, lately a recording expert for the Path4 
Fr4res Path4phone, Ltd. of London. 

The Orchestrelle Co., Ltd. was a British branch of the 
American Orchestrelle Compnay, both of which introduced the 
Vocalion gramophones with the "Graduola" device. The 
Aeolian Company of New York City was an associate company 
and when this company introduced its vertical cut, Vocalion 
Records in the Spring of 1919, some were pressed from 
Packman's earlier Marathon Record masters. The American 
Vocalion records were recorded at the Aeolian Company's 
studios at 35 West 33rd. Street, New York City, where 
C. R. Johnston was one of the recording experts. These red 
coloured vertical cut Vocalion Records had the last addit* 
ions to the catalogues in March, 1920, the company having 
turned to lateral cut discs a few months earlier with the 
expiry of the patents covering the lateral cut recording 
method. This would appear to signal the last time any use 
would have been made of Packman's "V" cut method of verti- 
cal recording, the British patents for which would not 
have expired until 1923/5* should the annual payments have 
been continued. 

THE MARATHON RECORD BAGS 

From the National Gramophone Co., Ltd. the record bags had, 
above the registered trade mark of a soundbox with ears, 
the words "Marathon Record", in capital letters, while the 
bags from the National Gramophone Co. (1913), Ltd. had the 


2087 

The soundbox should be set facing the front of the machine, 
not sideways, as with the ordinary type of machine." 

"Marathon" Records can be played on any make of Disc Machine 
but in order to set up your Soundbox in the correct position, 
it may be necessary to have one of our special adaptors, as 
illustrated above, which enables you' to use your present 
Soundbox." These Adaptors can be obtained from your dealer on 
mentioning the name and make of your machine, price 2s. 6d." 

,l The Marathon Soundbox, as ilustrated above, has been 
specially designed in connection with this record, giving a 
clearer tone, and greater volume, and is easily attached to 
standard makes of machines now on the market." To be obtained 
of all leading dealers in the Gramophone Trade on mentioning 
name and make of your machine. Price 3s • Purchasers of this 
special Soundbox need buy no separate adaptor." 

"Marathon Records are remarkable for theifc absence of scratch 
Marathon Records are rich in tone and clear in detail. 
Marathon Records should be played at a speed of approximately 
80 revolutions per minute, excepting where specially mention- 
ed in brackets in the catalogue." 

"Important Notice. Should you have any difficulties in 
obtaining supplies, or in playing these records, please 
communicate directly with the Company, mentioning type and 
make of your machine, and name and address of your nearest 
dealer." 

"Marathon Records wear longer than any others" 

FOOTNOTE 

'Musogram Ltd' was revealed as a debtor of Hawd& Spicer, Ltd, 
the proprietors of the Disc Record Co.Ltd., manufacturers of 
disc records, when Hawd & Spicer, Ltd voluntarily wound up its 
affairs in 1 909 • It is known that the Disc Record Oo. Ltd. 
supplied finished Musogram discs in 1908 and Hawd & Spicer, 
Ltd. could have supplied recording equipment, or parts, to 
Musogram Ltd. (We are grateful to Michael Kinnear for this 
information from his own researches.) 



word "Marathon" in longhand with the word "Records" under- 
neath within the flourish. 

There were a number of other differences between the record 
bags of the two companies. The first company had the 
slogan "For Quality and Quantity" which was replaced by 
"The Record that's Twice as Long" by the second company. 

An illustration which Bhowed how the Marathon adaptors 
were fitted to the tone-arms for the use of standard sound- 
boxes had the text removed by the second company which 
added "(B)" to the illustration. 

About needles, the first company's bags had "Marathon" Needles 
are strongly recommended for this record as they are speci- 
ally manufactured to give a full clear tone and save your 
records", while the second had, "Important" - "Marathon" 
Records should be reproduced only with needles of the very 
highest quality. "Marathon" Needles give the best results 
for all records. Use only "Marathon" Needles and lengthen 
the life of your records.". 

To the price 2s. 6d. on the sleeves of the first company 
for the adaptors, the second company added 3. 6d. as well. 

And to the text of the first company which read, "The 
Marathon" Record is superior to all other makes, playing up 
to 5 minuteseach side (10-inch) as against an average of 
under three minutes of other makes of 10-inch records, 
whilst the 12-inch Marathon Records play up to 85 minutes. 
Songs and musical selections can therefore be given without f 
cuts or omissions", the second company made an alteration 1 
by deleting all reference to the 12-inch size. 

Otherwise, except for a difference in lay-out and the com- q 
pany names, both texts were identical which read,"Marathon 
Records must be played with a steel needle commencing on 
the outer edge of the record, and playing towards the centre. 


soeciAu® 


LOWS 




Above: The Marathon needles 
box advertised in Mar, 1913. 
Left: An advertisement in 
Phonographische Zeitschrift 
28th.Jan,1913, by Wunderlich 
& Baukloh, needlemakers of 
Iserlohn, Germany for their 
•Violin' needles. Were these 
highly successful needles 
also packaged as 'Marathon' 
needles for export to 
London? 


2088 


important Notice to Dealers 

“ A BEV6LUII0H 
IN DISC RECORDS.” 


The “ National ” Gramophone 
Company, Limited, beg to direct 
the attention of the Trade to their 
new Patent Phono-cut 

MARATHON 



<< 


»* 


10" double sided Disc Records, and wish to 

lay stress upon the following points : — 

1. They are absolutely unique in the fact that a 
io-in. record plays up to 5 minutes on each 
side, as against 2^ to 3 minutes of any other 
make. 

2. Every song or selection can be given in 
its entirety without omissions or cuts. 

3. They can be played on any sapphire or needle 
disc machine, but only with a needle. 

4. It is claimed that by our patent process the 
full beauty of the record is brought out, 
which will be speedily recognised by con- 
noiseurs of music. 

5. It is an undoubted fact that through our 
process of recording, surface scratch is 
practically eliminated. 


Write to the 


Rational Gramophone fie., 


LIMITED, 


15, CITY ROAD, LONDON, E.C. 

For Lists and Terms. 

Telephone No. 6-92 1 London Wall 



PATRIOTIC TITLES. 


<1 The already strong list of patriotic titles 
on Marathon Records are strikingly 
augmented by the November supplement. 

CJ Hear any of the following records — 
you will be convinced that they are 
the finest ever placed on sale : — 

TWO GREAT RECRUITING SONGS. 

lO-in., 2/6. 

Miss HELEN BLA.1N — Orch. Acct. 

I Your King and Country Want You (Rubens) 
I Our Island Home 

Printed. Words Free of Charge. 


447 


446 


448 


422 


449 


450 •> 


2058 


Mr. HERBERT HEYNER — Piano Acct. 
Fall In (Cowen) 

We’re all plain Civilians (Hastings) 

NATIONAL GUARDS BAND. 

Bpisodes in a Soldier’s Life 
Descriptive — in 2 parts. 

Loyal to the King March 
War March of the Priests 

Mr. ROBERT HOWE — Orch. Acct. 

Who’s for this Blag (Russell) 

Men of England (Capel) 

L T nion Jack of Old England 
Soldiers of the King 

12-in., 4 /- 

NATIONAL GUARDS BAND. 

Reminiscences of Scotland 
in 2 parts 


DURING THE WAR. 

SOUND BOXES are given free of charge to purchasers 
of worth of Marathon Records. 
ADAPTORS are given free to all ’ purchasers of 
Marathon Records to the value of 10/- or 15/-. 

Let us send you full particulars. 



“The Record that’s Twice as Long.” 


(1913). 

Ltd., 


The National Gramophone Go., 

15 - 17 , CITY ROAD, London. E.C. 

'Phone 6922 London Wall Telegrams CS22 Wall, London. 


June 


19 12 


November 


19 14 




2089 



Mr. Marathon's Musical Monologues an l Truth Talks 

Let Mr. Marathon personally 


conduct you through the 


Realms of World’s Best 


Music in 1914 : 


6 e 


V / you had 
f / your copy 
\ of 7*Ae Dance 
Record Li*t? 


STRING BAND OF 
H.M, ROYAL 

ARTILLERY, Woolwich 
2015 

Mirella Overture 

Gounod 

Romeo and Juliet 
(Selection) Gounod 

TWO excerpts from 
* Gounod’s lesser 
known Operas, but 
nevertheless instilled 
with all that charm 
of melodic theme 
which has made his 
“Faust" the most 
popular of all Operas 
in this country. Both 
numbers are daintily 
interpreted by this 
wonderful orchestra 
under the baton of 
Mr. E. Stretton ; the 
stringand wood wind 
instruments being 
particularly Hue 
throughout. 

Mr W RUSHFORTH 

Bell and Chime Solos, 
accompanied by 

NATIONAL GUARDS 
BAND. 

375 

Chrlttmaa Gem* 

Partridge 

Bells of Auld Lang 

Syne Partridge 

INTRODUCES ill! 

* the well-known 
seasonable airs, play- 
ed on the Glocken- 
spiel and chimes al- 
ternately with full 
band accompaniment 
The effects secured 
arc beautiful in the ' 
extreme. This is a 
record which cannot 
fail to strongly ap- 
peal to music lovers. 


Ladybird Tango 

P S. Robinson 

Played by the 

NATIONAL 
GU ARDS BAND. 

NATIONAL 
GUARDS BAND. 

(for Dancing). 

379 

La Rumba Tango' 

(T. Bryan ) 

La Bella Craoie Farban 

Argentine Tango 

THE Tango has 

1 caught the 
country in its grip, 
and this fascinating 
dance measure is now 
all the rage. Here 
are given four of the 
best examples render- 
ed at accurate dance 
tempo in each in- 
stance. These records 
are extra loud in 
order that they can 
be used for dancing 
purposes, for which 
they will he found ex- 
cellent in every way. 

MARK SHERIDAN 

Comedian. Orchestral 

Accompaniment. 

400 

Wbat a gam* It la, 

wow I wow I 

Gifford & Godfrey 

Ragtime Mad 

Leo & Dowley 

G RE VT ! is the 
^ only word which 
can be applied to Mr. 
Mark Sheridan, who 
this month makes his 
first appearance on 
Marathon Records. 

The songs are charac- 
teristic of " Mark" in 
his very best vein. 
Certain it is that 
the creator of “One 
of the B'hoys ' has 
never done himself 
more justice. A re- 
cord which will be 
thoroughly enjoyed. 


A POINT 


THAT 


NEEDED 


CLEARING 


H OW long do 
Marathons 
wear, Sir? Why, 
aa long and 
longer than 
other*. A* with 
any make of 
R e o o r d, It 
depend* on the 
n u m b * r of 
time* they’re 
ployed. You’ve 
heard of one 
make of reoord 
t a * 1 1 n g year* 
and year* and 
y * a r *. Of 


10- inch 
Double 

2/6 

12- inch 
D o u ble 

Ah 


have; and 
there’* no reaeon 
why that kind 
* h o u I d not 
laet for aver. It 
depend* entire- 
ly on the num- 
ber of time* a 
Record I* play- 
ed, Sir . . . . 


Yes Sir' Twice as Long" 
as Strong More Hours 
enjoyment on Marathons than on any 

other Records'^ 


An advertisement from 1914 








2090 


THE MARATHON RECORDS 


The Marathon Records, issued by both "National" companies, bore labels in varying shades of 
grey printed in black and white. "Marathon", printed in long hand script, ended with a 
flourish sweeping back below the word. In the flourish was the word "Record". These 
flourishes were differently coloured according to the repertoire. Blue was used for combined 
voices, green for instrumentalists, pink for comedy, purple for celebrities, red for solo 
singers and white for bands and orchestras. 

The method of marking the matrices was another unique feature on Marathon Records for the 
matrix numbers were suffixed by letters indicating the class of artiste recorded thereon. 


B M . 

Bands 

B 

0 

- Orchestra 

FCo 

. Contralto 

F 

S 

. Soprano 

I C 

. 'Cello 

IB. 

Banjo 

I 0 

. Ocarina 

I P 

- Piano 

I 

Po- Piccolo 

I V 

. Violin 

I X - 

Xylophone 


ON. Organ 

I A 

. Acoordeon 

M B 

. Bass 

M 0 

. Vocal c 

M T • 

Tenor 

C 

S 

. Comic song 

T R 

■ Vocal trio 

I 

M 

. Instrumental trio 


Any additonal information or any known discrepancies to the above would be welcome 
information 

The original label from the first company bore the soundbox with ears in the uppr half of the 
label; it was later placed in the lower half. The second company had its corporate name 
on the labels to replace its predecessor's name. The only other variations known concerning 
labels lies with the different type-faces used. Marathon Records were sold by the "SERIAL" 
number common to both sides of each disc. A number of discrepancies among the various sources 
listing Marathon Records have been noted. Thus double entries are required in our list against 
Serial numbers 283, 357, 4 2 5, 443, and 463. Additionally, some titles and 

artists say not have the correct Serial numbers as issued. Serials 182 and 2063 
are still requiring full details of titles, artists, composers. 

Thank you to George Frow, Edward Hurray Harvey, Roger Thorne, 

Stuart Upton, Leonard Watts for so many matrix numbers. 

Records marked, e.g. 142* were specially recorded for dancing 
at accurate tempo & were part of the "Marathon" Dance Album. 


MARATHON RECORDS CATALOGUE 

10 - inch diameter, with issue dates. (Speed 80 rpm. Price 2s. 6d. each) 


Ser i a 1 - 



Ser i a 1 - 




month | matrix 

artist 

titles & composers 

month 

| matrix artist 

titles & composers 

i ssued 



issued 




101 

National Guards Band 

Casino Tanze, waltz (Gung'l) 

130 


284CS 

Yolande Noble 

Jenny McGregor (James W. Tate) 

Jly 12 

" 

Old Comrades, march (Teike) 

Oct 

12 

323CS 

H 

Keep quite close to the rai 1 ings(Edgar, 

102 210BM 

National Guards Band 

Mora i mo - caprichio Espanol (Espinosa) 





Barnes, Darewski) 

Jly 12 208BM 

" 

Les patlneurs - The skaters, waltz(Waldteufel ) 

131 


309CS 

Billy Merson 

The Spaniard that blighted my life(Merson) 

103 

National Symphony Orch. 

"1 Pagliacci" - selection (Leoncavallo) 

Oct 

12 

31 ICS 

" 

I'm going away (Merson) 

Jly 12 

N 

The passing of Salome, waltz (A. Joyce) 

132 



Harry Champion 

Carroty (Long) 

104 

n 

"TannhHuser" - selection (Wagner) 

Oct 

12 


N 

I'm proud of my old bald head(Murray,Col 1 ins ) 

Jly 12 


"Ballet Egypt ien" - selection (Lulgini) 

133 



Jack Charman 

He played it on his fiddle-de-dee (Goetz, 

105 

Victor Opferman -violin 

Berceuse (Daube) 

Oct 

12 



1 . Ber 1 1 n ) 

Jly 12 

" 

Humoreske (Dvorak) 



Who were you with last night? (Godfrey, 
T.R.0.U.B.L.E(Col 1 Ins, Terry) M - Sh eridan) 

106 

A violin & flute duo 

Souvenir (Drdla) 

134 

12 


Jack Charman 

Jly 12 

" 

Serenade (Schubert) 

Oct 


" 

Whistling Barney Ma lone(Dodds, Goff in) 

107 

A violin & flute duo 

The herd girl's dream (Labitzky) 

135 


307 IP Herr W. Meyrowitz, piano 

Home, sweet home(Bi shop,transcr . Thai berg) 

Jly 12 

vi loin, f lute, cel lo trio 

Serenade (Titl) 

Oct 

12 

308 IP 

" 

"Tales of Hof fmann"-Barcarole(Of fenbach 








transc.Meyorwitz) 

108 

Stanley Kirkby 

The Trumpeter tAirlie Dix) 

136 



Billy Whitlock, xylo. 

Jolly coons(Whitlock) 

Jly 12 

" 

a) Two eyes of grey (D. McGeoch) 

Oct 

12 


" 

The Islanders' March(Whitlock) 

109 

Stanley Kirkby 

1 wonder if you miss me sometime (Scott) 

137 



St. Hi Ida's Colliery Prize 


Jly 12 

" 

My dreams (P.Tosti) 




Band, cond. James Oliver 

The President, march (German) 

110 236MBe 



Nov 

12 


" 

Death or glory, march(Hale) 

Robert Carr 

The green Isle of Erin (Roeckel) 





Jly 12.245MBe 

" 

Love, could 1 only tell thee (Capet) 

138 


346BM 

St. Hi Ida's Colliery Prize 
Band, cond. James Oliver 

Cleadon Park (Greenwood) 

111 2 34MBe 

Robert Carr 

The ringers (H.Lohr) 

Nov 

12 

347BM 

• 

Nearer, my God, to Thee( Rev. Dykes) 

Jly 12 2345MBe " 

Reuben Ranzo (E. Coates) 













"Henry VIII Dances (Edward German) 

112 237MBe 

Robert Carr 

When the convent bell is ringlng(Mel lor. 

139 


289BM 

National Guards Band 

Shepherd's Dance, Morris 



Clifford, Trevor) 

Nov 

12 

290BM 


Dance and Torch Dance 

Jly 12 2 38MBe 

" 

The little shepherdess of Devon (Harrington, 








Hemley) 

140 



National Guards Band 

Aurora March (Unrath) 

113 

Robert Howe 

Nirvana(S. Adams) 

Nov 

12 


N 

Waldmere March (Losey) 

Jly 12 

" 

An old garden (H. Temple) 

141 



National Guards Band 

"Si j' eta is Roi "-Ouverture(Adam) 

114 244MBe 

Robert Howe 

The two grenadiers(R.Schumann) 

Nov 

12 


" 

"Fra Diavolo"-Ouverture (Auber) 

Jly 12 246MBe 

" 

a)Until (W. Sanderson) b)Youth (Allitsen) 

143 


373BM 

National Guards Band 

Now and then, polka (Coote) 

115 

Jack Charman 

It was three o'clock in the morning(David,Penso) 

Nov 

12 

374 BM " 

La Czarina Mazurka (L.Gann£) 

Jly 12 


Patricia (M. Scott) 

143 



National Symphony Orch. 

"The Girl in the Taxi" - Waltzes(J.Gi Ibert) 

116 

Jack Charman 

1 am busy in the city, Kitty 

Nov 

12 


« 

Rememberance Waltz(Archibald Joyce) 

Jly 12 

" 

Alexander's ragtime band (1. Berlin) 

144 



National Symphony Orch. 

The Eternal Waltz (Franz Lehar) 

117 

Harry Cove 

Just a wee deoch an' Doris (H. Lauder) 

Nov 

12 


N 

"The Pink Lady" - Waltz (Ivan Caryl 1) 

Jly 12 

" 

My baby (Rule, Pel ham) 

145 



National Symphony Orch. 

Love's last word, waltz (Cremieux) 

118 291BM 

National Guards Band 

The Siamese Patrol (P. Linke) 

Nov 

12 


• 

Dolores, valse (Waldteufel) 

Oct 12 334BM 

N 

The camels' parade (Rohmer, Thurban) 

146 



National Symphony Orch. 

The policeman's holiday-two step(M. Ewing ) 

119 

National Guards Band 

Marathon march (Gay) 

Nov 

12 


» 

Burglar Bill - two step (Godin) 

Oct 12 

" 

Our sailor king (Gay) 

147 



Charles Draper, clar ionet 

Concertino, part 1 (C. M. von Weber) 

120 288BH 

National Guards Band 

Red Pepper - A spicey rag (H. Lodge) 

Dec 

12 


" 

Concertino, part 2 (C. M. von Weber) 

Oct 12 292BM 

" 

The Gnat (Eckersley) 

148 



Senor Jose Gomez, violin 

"Thais" - Meditation (Massenet) 

121 296B0 

National Symphony Orch. 

"Gipsy Love" - selection 1 (Franz Lehar) 

Nov 

12 


" 

Cavatina (Raff) 

Oct 12 297B0 

H 

"Gipsy Love" - selection 2 (Franz Lehar) 

149 



Darbishire Jones, cello 

"Serse" - Largo (Handel) 


National Symphony Orch. 

"African Dances" (M. Ring) - 

Nov 

12 


« 

Traumerei (R. Schumann) 

122 263BO 

" 

a) Call to the feast b) The narrator 






Oct 12 2 64 BO 

M 

c) Lul eta's Dance d) Dance of the Warriors 

150 


329 IX 

Bi 1 ly Whitlock, -xylo. 

The Kentucky Patrol (Whitlock) 




Nov 

12 

331 IX 

" 

Keep on, rag (Whitlock) 

123 326BO 

National Symphony Orch. 

In a pagoda (Bratten) 






Oct 12.327BO 

H 

On the road to Zag-a Zig (Herman Finck) 

151 



Carrie Lance ley 

Ave Maria (Schubert) 



Nov 

12 


" 

Serenade (Gounod) 

124 

Carrie Lancely 

The children's home (Sir F. Cowen) 






Oct 12 

« 

Sing, sweet bird (Gann4) 

152 

368MBe 

Frederic Gregory 

Be a man (Cooke, Pether) 



Nov 

12 

369MBe " 

The young carabineer (Tunbridge) 

125 

Philip Ritte 

When shadows gather (C.Marshall) 






Oct 12 

H 

Bring back the sunshine (Deane) 

153 



Gwynne Davies 

1 hear you calling me (C.Marshall) 



Nov 

12 


" 

Somewhere a voice is calling (Tate) 

126 269MBe 

Roebrt Howe 

Anchored (Watson) 






Oct 12 324MBe 

" 

The little hero (Adams) 

154 



Gerald O'Brien 

Let me dream again (Sullivan) 

127 

Robert Howe 

Three for Jack (Squire) 

Nov 

12 


" 

Your heart will call me home(Tate) 

Oct 12 

" 

Will o' the Wisp (Cherry) 

155 



Robert Howe 

Lorraine, Lorraine, Lorra i ne(Capel ) 

128 

Gerald O'Brien 

Macushla (Macmurrough ) 

Nov 

12 


" 

Drake gee's west (Edward German) 

Oct 12 

" 

The minstrel boy (tradional, arr. Moore) 

156 



Wilfred Platt 

Simon the cellarer (Hatton) 

129 285CS 

Yolande Noble 

Let's all go into the ballroom ( A 1 Ien, Murphy ) 

Nov 

12 


" 

The diver (Loder) 

Oct 12 282CS 

H 

Joshu-ah (Arthurs, Lee) 







2091 


Ser i a I 
month 
i ssued 

157 

Nov 12 

158 

Nov 12 

159 

Nov 12 

160 

Dec 12 
161 

Nov 12 
162 

Nov 12 

163* 
Dec 12 

164* 
Dec 12 

165 

Dec 12 

166 

Dec 12 
167 

Dec 12 


168 

Dec 12 

169 

Dec 12 

170 

Dec 12 

171 

Dec 12 

172 

Dec 12 

173 

Dec 12 

174 

Dec 12 

175* 
Dec 12 

176* 
Dec 12 

177* 
Dec 12 

178* 
Dec 12 

179* 
Dec 12 

180 


Feb 13 
181 

Dec 12 
182 

Dec 12 
183 

Dec 12 


184 

Dec 12 
186 

Dec 12 
187 

Dec 12 


188 

Dec 12 
109 

Dec 12 


matrix artist 


composers 


Harry Champion 

w.orch . 

Have a drop of gin, Joe(Tabrar,Burley ) 

190 


" 

" 

1 was holding my cokernut(Col 1 i ns, Burley) 

Dec 

12 

Jack Charman 

w.orch 

Hello! Susie Green(Barret,Darewsk i ) 

191 


" 

" 

1 want a girl (Dillon, von Tilzer) 

Dec 

12 

Fred Elton 

w.orch. 

C. 0. H. E. N. (Elton) 

192 


" 

" 

The glad, glad eye (Elton) 

Dec 

12 

Vera Wooton 


Come for a strol 1 on the Jetty (Staunton, 


( 



Cuthbertson) 

193 


" 


The tale that Mary told the soldier(Lambe) 

Dec 

12 

379TR Marathon Ragtime 

Trio 

Oh! You beautiful dol 1 (Brown, Ayer ) acc.orch. 

194 


380TR 


The gaby glide (Pitcher, Hirsch) " 

Feb 

13 

Marathon Ragtime 

Trio 

Everybody's doing it (Irving Berlin) acc.orch 

195 


" 


H itchy Koo (Muir Abrahams) " 

Feb 

13 

National Guards 

Band 

Royal Scots Lancers- figs 1,2,3 (arr. Wright) 

196* 

" 


" " " figs 4 4 5 ( " ) 

Feb 

13 


Ser i a I . 

month | matrix artist titles 4 composers 

issued * 

Marathon Concert Party The Christmas Party-descriptive, part 1 
n ii •• n " part £ 


Gladys Huxley 


(has 410CR and 310CR on labels) 


If you feel lonely (Stretton,Thurban ) 

Love me just a little, but more(Ha i nes,Lutz ) 

The Gay Cavalier (Merson) 

The yacht I've not got (Merson) 


Harry Champion w.orch The ragtime shop (Col I ins, Bur ley) 
" Daisy's daisy roots (Murray, Rogers ) 


National Guards Band 


Prairie Flower, march (J. Ord-Hume) 
Lynwood, march (J. Ord-Hume) 


National Guards Band Flowers of the North Quadri I les-pt.1 (arr.Scott- 

" " " " " h pt.2( " Skinner) 

McKenzie Murdoch 

Guarnerius violin Mauchline 
" The Auld Hoose 

McKenzie Murdoch 

Guarnerius violin Highland boat song (trad, arr. Murdoch) 

" Scottish gems of today (arr. Murdoch) 

Pipe Major H. Forsyth Medley of Scottish Airs, a. Cock of the north. Miss 

bagpipes w. drums Drummond of Perth, Miss McLeod of Raasey, Highland 

Laddie 

" Medley of Scottish A irs,b. Barren Rock of Aden, 

Highland Fling, Christmas Carousal ,Campel Is are 
coming 

Alan Turner acc.pno A hundred pipers (trad.) 

" " The land o' the leal (Old Scots song) 

Tom F. Kinniburgh w.orch. Annie Laurie (Lady J.W. Scott) 

" Loch Lomond (Lady J.W. Scott) 


) " El Deseo waltz (Era) 

National Symphony Orch. The ragtime violin- two step (I. Berlin) 
" Sandy Mac - two step (Meredith, Kay ) 

197 500B0 National Symphony Orch. Pirouette (Herman Finck) 

Feb 13 475BO " The butterfly's ball (Higgins) 

198 4121V E. Meier violin w.pno Berceuse de 'Jocelyn' (Godard) 

Dec 13 4131V " * Nocturne in E flat (Chopin) 

199 48310 Professor M. Tapiero 

Feb 13 ocarina w. orch Bruna Waltz (Tapiero) 

48310 " Echo Mazurka (Tapiero) 

Professor Tapiero's amazing akill on the ocarina is 
world famous. The solo instrument is recorded to 
perfection. 

200 Emilie Hayes w.pno All aboard for Bye-Bye Land (Harrington, 

Mar 13 Barnes, Scott) 

" " The land of I Dunno Where(Lei gh,Pether ) 


201 Vera Moore 

Feb 13 " 


Harry Cove w.orch 

M H 

Harry Cove w.orch 


They'll no ken you're a Scotsman (Bruce) 
Hey, mon Sandy (Lawson) 


It's nice when you love a wee I ass ie( Lauder ) 

" " The same as his father before hlm(Wel Is, Terry, 

Lauder ) 

425BM National Guards Band Onward Christian Soldiers(Su I I i van) 

426BM " "Messiah" - Hallelujah Chorus (Handel) 

National Guards Band Christmas melodies, part 1 

1- played by double- 
part Z brass quartet 

427BM National Guards Band A motor ride - descriptive (T.Bidgood) 

428BM " A hunting scene - descriptive ( 

National Guards Band The crab's crawl - one step (A.du Blonc) 

" S. R. Henry's Schott ische (Henry) 

National Guards Band The wearing of the Green, lancers-f ig.1,2,3(Kaps) 
" " " " " " " -fig. 4 & 5(Kaps ) 

National Guards Band The coster's wooing - barn dance(Wi I I iam Rimmer) 

" Jolly fellows galop (Lust lgbruder)(Faust) 

National Symphony Orch. Sir Roger de Cover ley-round dance (trad.) 

" Invitation to the waltz (von Weber) 

National Symphony Orch. I'll dance till the sun breaks through-two step 

(A. Joyce) 

" Have you forgotten? - waltz (Archibald Joyce) 

348BB St. Hi Ida's Colliery Band The Conqueror March (Moorhouse) 

The above recording, and those on 137 4 138 are played by the band 
which won the 1,000 Guinea Trophy at the Crystal Palace, 1912 
292BM National Guards Band Caesar March (Robinson) 

James Glover w.orch The Holy City (Stephen Adams-real name Michael 

" " The Star of Beth I ehem(S. Adams) Maybrick) 

Margaret Balfour w.pno Land of Hope and Glory- (Elgar) 

" " The Lost Chord (Sir. A. Sullivan) 


A. Kellet w.pno She is far from the I and(Lambert ) 

" I'll sing thee songs of Araby (F.Clay) 

(Tenor soloist of St. Paul's Cathedral) 

271MBe Robert Howe w.pno Once aboard the lugger (D.D. Slater) 

270MBe " "A sailor's dance (J.L.Molloy) 

St. Paul's Cathedral Choir Good Kind Wenceslas (trad.) 

" A Virgin Unspotted (trad.) 

St.Paul's Cathedral Choir Good Christian Men Rejoice (trad.) 

" The First Nowell (trad.) 

Mr. Pen Caws - Raconteur 4 laughing comedian, w. piano. 

London "Street Arab" stories, touchingly told. 

(by Charles Penrose, under pseudonym) 

" Johnny, you and me (Corney Grain) 

" Christmas and bells (with bel IsHMayne, Harris) 

Olive Twain - Society Entertainer Jack and the beanstalk (trad.) 

" " The story of Goldilocks and the three bears(trad) 


213 

Feb 13 


214 

Feb 13 


215 

Feb 13 


217 

Mar 13 


Bring back my golden dreams (Meyer) 
All that I ask is love (Seldon) 


202 Gerald O'Brien w.pno Sympathy (Marshall) 

Feb 13 " "My sweetheart when a boy (Morgan) 

203 Robert Howe w.orch. "Gipsy Love" - Love and wine (F.Lehar) 

Feb 13 " " Ho! Jolly Jenkin (Sir Arthur Sullivan) 

The possessor of a full, rich, bass-baritone and a 
vigorous vocal method, Mr. Howe is one of the most 
successful record makers. The faithfulness of the 
'Marathon' system of recording is nowhere more 
strikingly demonstrated than In these records. 


204 


Alan Turner 


w.pno 

Feb 

13 

Frederic Gregory 

" 

205 


Mr. Pen Caws 

(Charles Penr 

Feb 

13 



w.pno 



" 


" 

206 


Billy Merson 


w.orch. 

Feb 

13 

" 


" 

207 


Harry Cove - 


w.orch. 

Feb 

13 

" 


" 

208 


Harry Cove 


w.orch. 

Feb 

13 

N 


N 

209 


Harry Cove 


w.orch. 

Feb 

13 

N 


" 




Mr 

. Cove's 


The miner's dream of home(Godwi n,Dryden ) 

ose, laughing comedian) 

He'd a funny little way with him( Penrose) 
The laughing family (Penrose) 

The bandit (Merson) 

It's going to be a serious thing for 
England (Merson) 

The ragtime viol ln( Irving Berlin) 

Waiting for the Robert E.Lee(Muir) 

Mister Cupid (Bert Weston) 

M.A.D.A.M. (F. Arthurs) 

Ring-a-ring o' roses (Frank Leo) 

If we all went on strike(David,Beck,Penso) 


these records. His enlnciation is clear and distinct; 
thus every humorous point may be thoroughly enjoyed. 

210 Harry Cove 4 Frederic Gregory There's a girl in Havana(Goetz,S loane) 

Feb 13 " w.orch. I want to be in Dixie( I .Berl in, T. Snyder) 


211 Harry Bayes Pucker up your lips, Miss Lindy(von Tilzer) 

Feb 13 " Take me to Fairyland (Edgar, Barnes) 

Leighton Gosforth w.orch. with great sentimental hits of the 1912-13 

pantomimes 

212 " " Take me back to your garden of love(Goetz, 

Feb 13 Osborne) 

" "My heart is with you tonight(Mi I Is, Scott) 


Gladys Huxley 


Flora Cromer 


Glays Huxley 


The wizard's spell (Bateman, Openshaw) 

I like you in your Sunday clothes(Murphy, 
David) 

There's an easy breezy way about a sailor 
(Trevor, Wright) 

I'd like to go on a honeyraoon(Wi Idman, Edgar ) 

Saturday afternoon till Sunday morning 
(Herman Darewski) 

I do love my wife (Castling, Murphy) 


216 National Guards Band Pleasureland - part 1 (arr. Neat) 

Mar 13 " " part 2 (arr. Neat) 

Introduces the cream of the hits of the 1912-13 
pantomimes. A particularly attractive record. 


National Guards Band The Irish Patrol (Irish patriotic airs) 

•• The Welsh Patrol (Welsh patriotic airs) 




composers 


National Guards Band 


The Contest, march (J.Ord-Hume) 
The Cuirissiers, march (Robinson 


National Symphony Orch. "Ballet Egypt ien" - part 1 (Luigini) 
" " - part 2 ( " ) 

National Symphony Orch. "Ballet Egypt ien" - part 3 (Luigini) 
" "i* — part 4 ( " ) 


Oily Oakley bjo. w.orch The darkey's awakening (Lansing) 
" " " Sweet jasmine (Oakley) 


Billy whitlock xylo.w.o. All O.T. (Whitlock) 

" " Up the river, waltz (Whitlock) 


48710 Professor M. Tapiero 

ocarina w.orch "Semi ram ide" - overture (Rossini) 

48810 " "La Paloma (Yradier) (has pink labels) 


Thomas Thomas 


w.pno Like stars above (W.H. Squire) 

" She wore a wreath of roses (Knight) 


Arthur Kel let, tenor solist of St. Paul's Cathedral 

w.pno An evening song (Blumenthal) 
" " Adieu Marie (Stephen Adams) 


w.pno John Peel (trad.) 

" The farmer's boy (trad. 


w.orch. The ready reckoner(EI lerton,Mayne) 

" Give me my fourpence back(EI lerton,Mayne) 


Phi I Parsons 


w.orch All through following the footprints in the 
snow (Edgar) 

" All through the Wedding March(Mi I Is, Scott) 


w.orch The ragtime jockeyman (Irving Berlin) 
" The wedding glide (Lou Hirsch) 


571CS Henry Bayes 
570CS 


w.orch The ragtime goblin man(Ster I ing.von Tl I zer) 
" Way down south (Fairman) 


Charles Draper clt. w.pno Coming through the rye (trad. arr. Clarke) 
" "Ye banks and braes (trad. arr. Cl arke) 


Frederic Gregory w.orch. Every man a soldier (Stanley) 

" "A sergeant of the line (W.H. Squire) 


454CS Eric Foster (Tyneside comedian) 

Last Neet (Foster) 


The grocery store (Foster) 
Industrious Geordie (Foster) 


Garrltty (Foster) 

Haak's Men at the Battle of Water I oo( Foster) 


National Guards Band 


Forward March (Doppler) 

The Gladiators farewell, march(Blankenburg) 


National Guards Band 


Die Hydropaten Waltz (Gung'l) 


Waltz from 'Coppella' bal let(Del ibes) 


National Guards Band 


Nat iona I Symphony Orch. 


"The Magic Flute" - overture, part 1 (Mozart) 
" " " overture, part 2 (Mozart) 


National Symphony Orch. "The Dancing Mistress" - selection, 1 (Monckton) 
" " " " selection, 2 (Monckton) 


597B0 National Symphony Orch. A darkie's jubilee (Turner) 


519BM National Guards Band 


Dream on the ocean (Gung'l) 


James Glover cornet, 
with full band 


The Rosary (Ethelbert Nevin) 

The lost chord (Sir Arthur Sullivan) 


Joseph Schofield cello acc. piano 

La Cinquantaine (G. Marie) 
" " Cantilena (Golterman) 


504IBo Oily Oakley, bjo. w.pno A dusky belle (Oakley) 

506 1 Bo " " " The spirit of the glen (Oakley) 


A. Kel let & Frederic Gregory "Lily of Killarney" - The moon hath raised 

her lamp above (Benedict) 

" " Watchman, what of the n ight( Sergeant ) 


341 MBe Robert Howe 


w.pno The adventurer (Godfrey) 
w.orch. Glorious Devon (Edward German) 


Wilfrid Platt 


Rocked in the cradle of the deep (Roeckel) 
In cellar cool (Old German song) 


w.orch. Waltz me in Ragtime (Mills, Scott) 
" My boy (Barnes, Weston) 


w.orch. I sent my sister Cisie to assist'er(Sul I ivan) 
" Major Dum Dum (Edgar) 


Frank Powel I 


w.orch. The por-tah (Hyde, Pet her) 

" P. C. Brown (Power) 

Mr. Powell is one of the most genuinely funny comedians, 
and is being 'starred' wherever he appears. He is 
exclusive to 'Marathon' records. 


Hayman & Franklin (The Hebrew Duo) A Complete Music Hall Sketch 
" Cohen's Mistake 2 parts (Hayman) 

A screamingly funny sketch, which tells how Cohen is 
induced to subscribe to the funds of an orphanage. 


Gwynne Davies 


w.pno O'Na Bydd Ain Haf o Hyd (Wm Davies) 
" Yr Hen Gerddor- The old minstrel 


National Guards Band 


The Scotch Patrol (Pi ft) 
The English Patrol (Pitt) 


National Guards Band 


Marche Mi 1 1 ta ire (Schubert) 
Muss i nan March (Carl) 


520BM National Guards Band 
559BM 


Lancashire Clogs (E. Grimshaw) 

The parade of the soldiers (L.Jessel) 


Contains clever 'muted' instrument effects 


National Symphony Orch. "Oberon" - overture, part 1 (von Weber) 
" " overture, part 2 (von Weber) 

The overture is given complete 


National Symphony Orch 


Valse triste (Sibelius) 
Praeludium (Jarnefeldt) 


4021V McKenzie Murdoch w.pno Auld Robin Gray (trad. arr. Murdoch) 

3971V " " East Neuch o' Fife (trad. arr. Murdoch ) 

In these numbers Mr. Murdoch demonstrates all that 
amazing skill which has won for him the title "The 
Scottish Paganini". They were played on a genuine 
Guanerius, the tone of which is faithfully preserved. 


Professor M. Tapiero ocarina with orchestra 

" Caste I Raimondo, march (Battachiara) 

" "Moses in Egypt"- Fantasia(Rossini, 

arr. Tapiero) 


474FCo Margaret Balfour w.pno Still as the night (Bohm) 

477FCo " "My dear Soul (W. Sanderson) 

Miss Balfour is very highly esteemed in the best concert 

circles 

Carrie Lance ley w.pno & v In. Serenade (Gounod) 

Joseph Schofield cello w. organ The Rosary (Ethelbert Nevin) 


w.orch. "Der Trompeter von Sakk ingen" - 

Werner's farewell (Nessler) 

" The Yeoman's Wedding Song (PoniatowskI ) 


w.orch. In the shadows of the pyramids (Ball) 

" Let me kiss those tears away (Mi 1 1 s, Scott) 


Phil Parsons 


Keep your feet sti 1 1 , Geordie Hinnie(trad, Foster) 


w.orch. I'm on my holiday (Mel lor, Gifford) 

" Here's another one off for a sailor 
(Barnes, Weston) 


Frank Lynne 
Jack Charman 


w.orch There's no flies on f ather(E I lerton,Mayne) 
" Dickie Bird (Cl If ford, Godfrey ) 

Mr. Frank Lynne is an original comedian who is 
exceedingly popular in the Midlands. His efforts will 
be thoroughly enjoyed. 


Joseph Schofield cello w.pno. Minuet(Boccherinl ) 

" . " Sici liana (Pergoles!) 


National Guards Band 


"Zampa" - overture, part 1 (Herold) 
" - overture, part 2 


Alexander's ragtime band-two step( Irving Berlin) 
Dixie revels - two step (Robinson) 


National Symphony Orch. 


"Oh! Oh! De I phine"-se lection ( I .Cary 1 1 ) 

" " " -Venus Waltz(I.Caryll) 


Herr W. Meyrowitz piano Polish dance (Scharwenka) 

" " Menuet (Paderewski) 


Gwladys Griffiths w.pno The slave song (Teresa del Riego) 

" " When Barney comes over the hi 1 1 (Meyrowitz) 


Arthur Kel let 


w.pno Where my caravan has rested (H.Lohr) 

" My little grey home in the west (H.Lohr) 


547MBe Ceredig Walters w.pno Bashful Tom (Kemp) 


251 MBe Robert Howe 


Dear Homeland (Slaughter) 


Ceredig Walters 


w.pno At Santa Barbara (Kennedy Russell) 
Corisande (Sanderson) 


w.orch That mellow melody(G. W. Meyer) 

" That ragtime dinnertime band(Wal Chandler, 
Will E. Haines) 


Jack Charman 


National Guards Band 


w.orch Dear old Rose(G. W. Meyer) 

" Oh! I do love you, my Orange Girl (Tom Mel lor) 
& Huntley Trevor) 

d Marche Lorraine (Louis Ganne) 

Le p&re de la victoire (Louis Ganne) 


National Guards Band 


Bravada March (Starke) 

Wedding bells(with chimesHW.Rimmer) 


National Guards Band 


Pomp and Circumstance March, No. 2 (Elgar) 
Salut d' amour (Elgar) 


National Symphony Orch. 


"The jewels of the Madonna"-Entr'acte 

(Wolf-Ferrari ) 

Passe Pied (Delibes) 


George Ackroyd flute w.pno. Swallows' flight (Ernesto Kohler) 
" " Shepherds' Idyll (Ernesto Kohler) 


Guido Gialdini whistler w.orch. "Puppchen"-My heart's desire(Gi Ibert ) 
" " " Winter March (J. Gilbert) 


2093 


Seri 

a 1 





Ser i a 1 



Month j 

matrix 

artists 


titles 4 composers 

Month . 

matrix art i s t s 


i ssued 





i ssued 



2 8 3 


Carrie Lanceley 

w.pno 

Lily of my heart (Henry Gheel) 

318 


May Mars 

w.orch. 

Nov 

13 


Madame Sarmiento 


La Villanelle (E.del 1 'Acqua)sung in French 

Sep 

13 

" 

" 

284 



Ivor Walters 

w.pno 

Roses (Stephen Adams) 

319 


704CS Billy Merson 

w.orch 

J ly 

13 


" 

" 

The last watch (Ciro Pinsuti) 

Sep 

13 

705CS 

" 

285 



Helen Goodwirght 

w.pno 

The better land (F. H. cowen) 



Gus Harris 

w.orch 

Jiy 

13 


« 

" 

When you come home (W. H. Squire) 

320 


"The People's Chorus 

Idol" 







Sep 

13 

H 

" 

286 



Marcus Thomson 

w.pno 

The devout lover (M. V. White) 





J iy 

13 


" 

" 

Beauty's eyes (P, Tosti) 

321 


Gus Harris 

w.orch 







Sep 

13 

" 

" 

287 



Ceredig Walters 

w.pno 

Jack Briton (W. H. Squire) 





J iy 

13 


« 

" 

Absent (J. W. MetcalfO 

32 2 

National Scottish Band 







Oct 

13 



288 



Gus Harris 

w . orch 

Hello, silvery sea (Castling, Murphy) 





J iy 

13 


" 

" 

Let's go to the church(Col 1 i ns, Rogers) 



„ 





Gus 

Harris 

is great. He is London's latest chorus comedian 








and 

is creating a furore wherever he appears. To hear him 








in < 

ane of his rollicking chorus numbers is to realise the 








utmost that 

can be done with songs of this type. 

323 


National Scottish Band 






• 

Oct 

13 



289 



Henry Bayes 

w.orch 

. The trail of the Lonesome Pine(Carrol 1, Fields) 





Jiy 

13 


" 

" 

On the Mississippi (Carrol 1 , Fields) 



* 


290 


682BM, 

.National Guards Band 

"Lohengrin"- Introduction to Act. 3 (R. Wagner) 





Aug 

13 

681 BM 

" 


TanhJIuser" - Grand March (R. Wagner) 



Pipe-Major Harold Forsyth 

291 


644 BM 

National Guards Band 

National Emblem, march (E. E. Bag ley) 

324 


bagpipes, with 

drums 

Aug 

13 

613BM 

" 


The Blue Riband, march (Gustave Bollag) 

Sep 

13 



292 



National Symphony Orch 

•Neath the trees (Henri Dupret) 





Aug 

13 


" 


"Les Millions d'Arlequin" - Serenade(Drigo) 






titles 4 composers 

The six telegrams (Hi I Is, Scott) 

Molly Molloy (Mi I I s, Scott) 

A prairie life for me (Merson) 

The wreck of the Dover Express (Merson) 


Whoops, let's do it again (Hargreaves) 
Tonight's the night (Castling) 

Telling the story (Murphy, Castl ing) 

I went to dance (Edwards) 

Scottish Reels, part 1 - The De'il among the 
tailors. Mason's apron. Clean pea strae. 
Soldier's joy. 

Scottish Reels, part 2 - Speed the plough. 
Mrs. Macleod, Fairy dance. 

The wind that shakes the barley. 

Scottish Reels, part 3 - Cameron's got his 
wife again. Speed the plough, Jenny Dang 
the weaver. Highland whisky. 

Scottish reels, part 4 - The piper o' Dundee 
Jessie Smith, Rachel Rae, Reel of Tulloch 

"Gledarnal Highlanders" - airs arr.Forsyth- 
Tul lochgroum-Strathspey, Reel of Tulloch. 
"Corn Riggs" - airs arr. Forsyth- Lord 
Lovat's Lament-march, Inverness Rant-Strath- 
spey, Blue bonnets over the border-march. 


James Glover trumpet w.full band 


Bi I ly Whitlock xylo.w.orch. 


Joseph Schofield cello w.pno Serenade (W. H. Squire) 

" mw Berceuse de 'Jocelyn' (Godard) 


293 

Aug 13 

294 

Aug 13 

295 

Aug 13 

296 

Aug 13 

297 

Aug 13 " 

298 641MBe Ceredlg Walters 
Aug 13 630MBe J. Dickinson 


Mary (Richardson) 

The children's home (Sir F. Cowen) 


Torchlight march (Whitlock) 
Moonlight Capers (Whitlock) 


Emi I ie Hayes w.pno 

Helena Goodwright w.pno 


Someday, sometime (Godfrey,Glfford,Knight) 
Just to be near you (Godfrey, Gif ford, Wright) 

Angus McDonald (Roeckel) 

Love's Coronation (Florence Ay I ward) 


w.orch. The veteran's song (S. Adams) 
Lighterman Tom (W. H. Squire) 


325 716FS Carrie Lanceley w.pno 

Sep 13 717FS " " 

326 790BM National Scottish Band 
Sep 13 

791 BM " 


The last rose of summer (Moore) 

Good-bye (P. Tosti) 

"Flowers of Ed inburgh", part. 1-The original. 
The lass o' Patie's Mill, (trad.) 

"Flowers of Edinburgh", part. 2-East Neuk o' 
Fife, The bottom of the bunch bowl. (trad.) 


327 National Scottish Band "Petronella Country Dance", intro.- The 

Sep 13 original. The dashing white sergeant(trad. ) 

"Petronella Country Dance", intro - My love 
she's but a lassie yet, 4 The rose tree(trad-) 


328 H.M. Royal Artillery Band 

Oct 13 cond. E. C. Stretton Birthday March (Kuhne) 

" " Casta I do March (Novacek) 


299 678MBe Robert Howe 
Aug 13 679MBe " 


w.pno A Dinder Courtship (Eric Coates) 
" The Floral Dance (Katie Moss) 


329 National Guards Band Niebelungen March (Wagner) 

Oct 13 " Triumphal March (Robinson) 


300 



Helen Blain 

w.pno 

Caller' Herrin' (trad.) 

Aug 

13 


■ 

" 

a) John Anderson, my Joe (trad) 






b)Gala Water (trad.) 

301 



Anderson NIcol 


The Scottish Emigrant's Farewell (trad.) 

Aug 

13 


" 

* 

Afton Water (trad.) 

302 



Frank Powel 1 

w.orch 

. The signalman's story (W. Hyde) 

Aug 13 


" 

H 

On the Line (W. Hyde) 

303 



Gus Harris 

w.orch 

1 want to see the fairies (Castl Ing, Murphy ) 

Aug 

13 


M 

" 

Show me the train (Castl ing, Murphy ) 

304 



Harry Cove 

w.orch 

The burglar rag (Brady, Mahoney, Ferguson) 

Aug 

13 


" 

M 

Hey Ho! Can't you hear the steamer? (Godfrey, 






Wright) 

305 



H.M. Royal Artillery Band, 


Sep 

13 


cond. E.C.! 

Stretton 

"Aida" - selection 1 (verdi) 




" 


" - selection 2 (Verdi) 

306 



National Guards 

Band 

Punjaub March (Charles Payne) 

Sep 

13 


M 


Bulgarian Patrol (Stephanoff) 

307 


714BM 

National Guards 

Band 

Spanish Dance No. 5 (Moskowski) 

Sep 

13 

652BM 

" 


El Abanico - Spanish march (Javaloyes) 

308 



National Symphony Orch. 

Amoranda (M. Ring) 

Sep 

13 


" 


The whispering of the flowers (von Blon) 

309 


688 IPo George Ackroyd 

piccolo w 

.orch. The deep blue sea (M. Brewer) 

Sep 

13 

689 1 Po 

" 

f 

" Weel may the keel row (trad. arr. 






Bonn i seau ) 

310 


751 IV 

David de Groot 

violin w.| 

pno Souvenir de Posen (Wieniawski) 

Sep 

13.7701V 

" 

" 

" Czardas (Monti) 

311 



Guido Gialdini 

whistler ' 

w.orch. Charme d'amour (Kendall) 

Sep 

13 


H 

" 

" In the shadows (Herman Finck) 

312 



Angelo Rossel 1 i 

w.pno 

Santa Lucia - Neapolitan song (Cottra) 

Sep 

13 


" 

" 

0 Sole mio (di Capua) 

313 



Angelo Rossel 1 i 

w.orch 

"1 Pagliacci" - Vest! la giubba (Leoncavallo) 

Sep 

13 


M 

" 

"La Tosca" - E lucevan le stel le (Puccini) 

314 



Anderson Nicol 


Mary of Argyle (Nelson) 

Sep 

13 


" 


The banks of Allan Water (trad.) 

315 



Ceredig Walters 

w.pno 

Pals (W. H. Squire) 

Nov 

13 


" 

" 

Thy sentinel am 1 (Watson) 

316 


580MBe 

Herbert Heyner 

w.pno 

On the road to Mandalay (Kipl ing,Hedgecock) 

Sep 

13 

581 MBe 

" 

" 

Danny Deever (W.Damrosch) 

317 


690MBe 

Robert Howe 

w.orch 

The Powder Monkey (Watson) 

Sep 

13 

691 MBe 

" 

" 

The Midshipmite (Stephen Adams) 


330 712BM National Guards March 

Oct 13 756BM " 

331 National Symphony Orch. 
Oct 13 


San Lorenzo March (C. A. Silva) 

The ragtime violin (Irving Berlin) 

Dear Brown Eyes, waltz (Frank Canham) 
Vivandiere March (Robinson) 


332 750BO David de Groot's Orch. "I Pagliacc!" - selection 1 (Leoncavallo) 

Nov 13 749B0 " "I Pagliacci" - selection 2 (Leoncavallo) 


333 

Oct 13 


334 

Oct 13 

335 

Oct 13 


Joseph Schofield cello w. piano The Coulln (Sir F. Cruse, M. Esposito; 
" mm Carolan's Concerto (Sir F. Cruse, 

M. Esposito) 


Marcel Bonneman 


violin w.pno 


Berceuse (Gabriel Faure) 
Canzonetta (d'Ambrosio) Op. 6. 


01 ly Oakley 

"The Banjo King" w. piano Husarenritt (Spindler) 

Camptown Carnival (J. Morley) 


336 

Angelo Rossel 1 i 

w.orch 

"Otel lo" - Morte di Otel lo (Verdi) 

Oct 13 

" 

" 

"1 Pagliacci" - Serenade (Leoncavaa lo) 

337 

Emi 1 ie Hayes 

w.pno 

Come sing to me (Thompson) 

?? 

" 

" 

Sing me to s leep( Greene) 


Although this disc appeared in an advertisement as 357 (Nov. 13) 
it is not printed in the Company's official supplement for Nov 13. 
Neither 337 nor 357 is there. Both are printed in the Feb 14 
supplement as we have them in this listing. We have not seen the 
Dec. 1913, nor the Jan. 1914 official supplements. 


338 


763MT 

Anderson Nicol 

w.pno 

Oct 

13 

764MT 

" 

" 

339 



Helen Blain 

w.pno 

Oct 

13 


" • 

" 

340 



Marcus Thomson 

w.pno 

Oct 

13 


" 

" 

341 



Robert Howe 

w.pno 

Oct 

13 


" 

w.orch 

342 



Marie Suart and 


Oct 

13 


Robert Howe 

w.pno 




H II 

" 

343 


794MBe 

Ceredig Walters 

w.pno 

Oct 

13 

795 MBe 

" 


344 



London Church Choir 

Nov 

13 


and Quartette 




" " 


345 



Frank Powel 1 

w.orch 

Oct 

13 


" 

" 


Duncan Gray (trad.) 

The Skye Boat Song (trad.) 

Annie Laurie (Lady J. W. Scott) 

Castles in the air (R. Adams) 

How deep the slumber of the f loods(Loewe) 
Sombre woods (Lully) 

The Blue Dragoon (Kennedy Russell) 

The Bedouin Love Song (CIro Pinsuti) 


Oh! That we two were Maying (Ethelbert Nevin) 
Still as the night (Carl Bohm) 

The ballad monger (Easthope Martin) 

Sweet early violets (Sherrington) 


All hail the power of Jesu's name(Shrubsole) 
Hark! Hark! My soul (Smart) 

The Postman (Given) 

The ocean blue (Matcham, Selby) 



2094 
Serial 
Month 
i ssued 

346 

Oct 13 

347 

Oct 13 

348 

Oct 13 

349 

Oct 13 

350 

Oct 13 


351 

Oct 13 

352 

Nov 13 

353 

Nov 13 

354 

Nov 13 

355 

Nov 13 

356 

Nov 13 

357 

Nov 13 

358 

Nov 13 

359 

Nov 13 

360 

Nov 13 

361 

Nov 13 

362 

Nov 13 

363 

Nov 13 

364 

Nov 13 

365 

Nov 13 

366 

Nov 13 

367 

Nov 13 

368 

Nov 13 

369 

Nov 13 

370 

Nov 1 3 

371 

Nov 13 

372 

Nov 13 

373 

Nov 13 

374 

Dec 13 

375 

Dec 13 


376 

Dec 13 


377 

Dec 13 


matri; 

x artists 


titles 4 composers 

775CS 

776CS 

Gus Harris 

w.orch 

Marriage (G.Col 1 ins) 

A girl (Collins, Murray) 


Carrie Lanceley 

w.pno 

Lilac time (Wilier by) 

Love, you have made me a garden(J. Thompson) 

726MBe Ceredig Walters 
728MBe " 

w.pno 

Bugeilior Gwenith Gwyn(ldle days in summer)trad 
Llandovery (Adieu to dear Cambria )(trad. ) 


Ceredig Walters 

w.pno 

Chwyfin Faner(Wave the banner)(Davies) 
Rhyvelgyrch Cadpen Morgan (trad.) 


Irwel 1 Springs Band 
cond. Mr. Nuttall 

North Star March (W.Rimmer) 
Pat in America (Hiram Eden) 


Irwel 1 Springs Band 
cond. Mr. Nuttall 

M II 

Evening Polka (W.Rimmer) 
Humoreske (Dvorak) 


Archibald Joyce's Orch. 
cond. Archibald Joyce 

Happy Days, waltz (Burrows) 
Vervienne Waltz (Cox) 

836B0 

837BO 

Archibald Joyce's Orch. 
cond. Archibald Joyce 

Powder rag - two step (Raymond Birch) 

On the Mississippi - two step (Car 1 ton, Fields) 


National Guards Band 

The bullfighter's March (C.Kottaun) 
Steadfast and true, march (Teike) 


String Band of H. 
Woo 1 w i ch , cond . C . E 

m n 

M. Royal Artillery, 

.Stretton Hungarian Dance no. 2 (Brahms) 
" Hungarian Dance no. 3 (Brahms) 


National Symphony Orch. 

"II Seraglio" - overture (Mozart) 

"The Marriage of Figaro"- overture( Mozart) 

700 IX 
701 IX 

Billy Whitlock xylo. w.orch Lively Kittens (Whiltlock) 

" mm The jolly workman (Whitlock) 


George Ackroyd flute w.orch "Carnival des Animaux"-Le Cygne(The swan) 

(Saint Saens) 

" mm Offertoire (Donjon) 


Marcel Bonnemain 

violin w 

•pno Madrigale (Simonetti) 

" Chant sans paroles (Tchaikovsky) 

698MT Angelo Rosselli 
699MT ■ 

w.pno 

Ricordi di Quisisana (L. Denza) 
Aubade - Mattinata (Leoncavallo) 


Margaret Balfour 

H 

w.pno 

Terence's farewell to Kathleen (Lady Dufferin) 
God's Garden (Lambert) 


Helen Blain 

w.pno 

A summer night (Goring Thomas) 
Creation's Hymn (Beethoven) 


Herbert Heyner 

w.pno 

The sand o' Dee (Fred Clay) 

Thou'rt passing hence, my brother (A.Sullivan) 


Marcus Thomson 
Marcus Thomson 

w.pno 

w.pno 

"Four Indian Love Lyrics"-(Amy Woodforde-F indent 
a)Kashimiri Song b) Less than the dust 

c)Temple Bells d) Till 1 wake 


Percy Whitehead 

w.pno 

Off to Philadelphia (Haynes) 

a) Famine Song (trad) b)Trotting to the fair 

(trad) 


Frederic Gregory 
Henry Bayes 

w.orch 

w.orch 

So you wantto be a sol dier, 1 itt le man(Trotere) 
It's a long way to Tipperary (Judge, Wi 1 1 iams) 

831FS 

830FS 

El da May 

w.pno When love creeps in your heart ( Bennett, Scott ) 

" Youth and love (Saker)-with flute obbligato by 

W. Paterson 


Daisy Taylor 

w.orch 

Play a Highland Melody (Rule,Castl ing) 

I'm coming back to Bonny Scotland 

(Hunt ley, Trevor, Wright) 


Frank Powel 1 

w.orch 

Married Misery (Chester) 
Winkle the waiter (Chester) 

803CS Henry Bates 
804CS 

w.orch 

You made me love you (J. Monaco) 

Hold your hand out, naughty boy (J. W. Murphy) 


National Scottish 

Band 

Foursome Reel, part 1 (trad) 

" " , part 2 (trad) 


National Scottish 

Band 

Eightsome Reel, part 1’ (trad) 
" " part 2 (trad) 


Billy Merson 
Gus Harris 

w.orch 

Don't sing in ragtime (Pel ham, Long, Merson ) 
Our sailor King (pel ham, Long) 


National Guards Band 

The Victoria Cross, march (Gustav Howig) 
Army and Marine March (W. Zehle) 


885BM W. Rushforth bells & chimes, 

with National Guards Band Christmas Gems (arr. Partridge) 

886BM " " " The bells of Auld Lang Syne (Partridge) 


Ser i a I 

Month | matrix artists titles 4 composers 

issued 

379 National Guards Band La rumba tango (T. Bryan) 

Dec 13 " La Belle Creole (Farban) 

380 784IBo Oily Oakley bjo. w.pno A Black Coquette (E. Grimshaw) 

Dec 13 " " . " The Yeoman's call (Cammermeyer ) 

381 796 1 Po Robert Murchie piccolo w.orch Le Merle Blanc (E.Damare) 

Dec 13 797lPo " " " Scherzo Br i 1 1 ante(C. le Thiere) 

382 Madame Maude Dewey 

Feb 14 (bird imitator) Imitations of English Song Birds 

Mr. A. Gilroy whistler w.pno II Bacio (Arditi) 

383 935BM National Guards Band The "Evening News" tango (Stephen Hamilton) 

Feb 14 942BM " Up-to-date (1913-14) Barn Dance (Henry 

Woods). Founded upon the following 
popular melodies - 'My little Parisian 
Rose', 'The wedding glide', 'How do you do. 
Miss Ragtime?', 'When the midnight choo-choo 
leaves for A I abam' , 'Gaby Glide'. 


384 



Margaret Balfour 

w.pno 


Feb 

14 


and 

violin obbligato Daddy (Behrend) 




" " 

N 

" Love's old sweet song(Molloy) 

385 



Marcus Thomson 

w.pno 

A dream (Bartlett) 

Dec 

13 


" 

" 

At the mid-hour of night (F. H. Cowen) 

386 



National Guards Band 


Oct 

14 


with Robert Howe 

"Vive 1 'Entente Cordiale" part 1 






a) The Russian National Hymn 

b) God save the King 




National Guards Band 

"Vive 1 'Entente Cordiale" part 2 






a) La Braba9onne (Campenhout) 

b) Rule Britannia (Dr. Arne) 

387 



Robert Howe 

w.pno 

Chorus, Gentleman (Hermann Lohr) 

Dec 

13 


" 

M 

Four jolly sailormen (Edward German) 

388 


820MB 

Tom E. Kinniburgh 

w.pno 

The bellringer (Vincent Wallace) 

Dec 

13 

821MB 

" 

" 

The valliage blacksmith(Longfel low. 






W.H. Weiss) 

389 



Henry Bayes 

w.orch 

The way the wind blows, we' II go 

Dec 

13 




( Judge, Wi 1 1 i ams) 




" 

" 

Toddling home (H.Dent) 

390 



National Symphony 

Orch. 

Un peu d' amour (Silesu) 

Feb 

14 


" 


Secrets, waltz (Charles Ancliffe) 

391 



National Guards Band 

La Rinka - round dance (T. Beale) 

Feb 

14 


" 


The Valeta - round dance (A. Morris) 

392 



String Band of H. 

M . Roya 1 


Feb 

14 


Artillery, Woolwich, cond. 

E.C.Stretton- 






Minuette (Mozart) 




" " 

" 

Am Muhlbach(At the mi 1 lrace)(P.Lincke) 

393 



Harry Cove 4 Jack 

Charman 

w.orch. Sandy's Hogmanay .descr.Pt 1(Cove) 

Dec 

13 


" 

" 

" Sandy's Hogmanay-descr.Pt.2(Cove) 

394 



Daisy Taylor 

w.orch 

Sandy, take hold of my hand (Glover) 

Dec 

13 


" 

" 

Sing me a song of Bonny Scot land( Scott) 

395 



Gus Harris 

w.orch 

Let's all go round to Maudie's(Hargreaves) 

Dec 

13 


" 

" 

It's a long way to go home(Godf rey, Gifford) 

396 



Jack Charman 

w.orch 

My home is far away(Pether,Lee) 

Dec 

13 


" 

" 

When the Christmas Bells are ringing 






(Pet her, Lee) 

397 



National Symphony Orch. 

Tres Doggy-Two-step i ntermezzo(Lol a Moretti ) 

Feb 

14 


" 


Dance of the Darkies-Barn dance( J.E.Pei Igen ) 

398 



James Brown accordeon 

Medley of hornpipes (trad.) 

Dec 

13 


" 

" 

Rainbow schott ische (trad.) 

399 



Ceredig Walters 

w.pno 

Rhyvelgyrch gwyn Harlech(Men of Harlech) 

Dec 

13 


H 

" 

Llwyn 0n(The Ash Grove)- both traditional 

400 



Mark Sheridan 

w.orch 

What a game it is-Wow! Wow! (Gi f ford, Godfrey) 

Dec 

12 


" 

" 

Ragtime mad (Frank Leo, Bow ley) 

401 



Marathon Instrumental Trio- 

Feb 

14 


(Viol in,f lute, harp) 

"Tales of Hofmann"-Barcarole(Offenbach) 




" 


La Villanelle (del 'Acqua) 

402 


903 1C 

Joseph Schofield 

w.pno 

Ramances sans paroles (Davidoff) 

Feb 

14 

902 1C 

" 

" 

Lied ohne Worte(Mende 1 ssohn ) 

403 



George Ackroyd flute w.pno, 

.Mazurka de salon(Doppler) 

Feb 

14 


" 

" " 

Berceuse de 'Jocelyn' (Godard) 

404 



Helen Blain w. piano 4 pno. 

.Home, sweet home (Bishop) 

Feb 

14 


" " 

" 

The Rosary (Ethelbert Nevin) 

405 



Ceredic Walters 

w.pno 

Thora (Stephen Adams) 

Feb 

14 


" 

■ 

"The Marriage Market"-The bachelor ship 


(D. Richards) 


Archil bald Joyce's Orchestra 

cond. Archibald Joyce El Choc I o - tango (A. A. VI 1 1 o I do ) 
824BM National Guards Band The ladybird Tango (P. S. Robinson) 


406 
Feb 14 


407 
Feb 14 


815BM String Band of H.M. Royal Artillery, 

Wool wich, cond. E.C.Stretton "Sylvia" ballet music - Pi zz icato(Del ibes) 

" " " "Sleeping Beauty" ballet music-Waltz(Tchaikovsky) 408 

National Symphony Orch. My Sumurun Girl - two step (Lou Hirsch) 


Percy Whitehead 
Ceredig Waiters 

Mark Sheridan 


The old gray fox (M. V. White) 

Land of delight (Wilfred Sanderson) 

Colonel Nutt (Fred Godfrey) 

We'll march to Trafalgar Square(Mi I Is, Scott) 

Palestine (William Hyde, Robson) 

A Yiddisher honeymoon (Fred Godfrey, Cl if ford) 


378 

Dec 13 


My Sumurun Girl - two step (Lou Hirsch) 
"Puppchen" - Waltz (J. Gilbert) 


Seri a I 
Month | 
i ssued 1 
409 
Feb 14 


matrix a r t i s t s 
Gerald Hazard 


titles A composers 

w.orch When I get you alone ton ight(McCarthy, Goodwin, 

" My Southern Maid(Barrett,Darewski ) Fischer) 


410 950MD Ida Jones & Gerald Hazard Take me in your arms and say you love me 

Feb 14 w.orch (J. Rosamond Johnson) 

951MD " " M You made me love you(James Monaco) 

(This record seen with a label overstuck saying Daisy & Gerald Hazard) 


411 

Feb 14 

412 

Mar 13 

413 

Mar 14 

414 
Nov 14 

415 

Oct 14 

416 

Mar 14 


James Brown accordeon w.pno. Weary Willie - two step (trad.) 
M " "Little pet polka (trad.) 


National Guards Band 
National Guards Band 
National Symphony Orch. 
National Symphony Orch. 


Austria, march (J. Nowotny) 

Cecilia, march (C.Kottaun) 

"Henry VIII" - Procesional March (A. Sullivan) 
"La Reine de Saba" - Corte March )(C. Gounod) 

Menuet (Paderewski) 

The Butterfly (T. Bendix) 

Laughing eyes (Herman Finck) 

" Thy burning eyes (C. Worsley)* 

Marathon Instrumental Trio Love's old sweet song (Mol loy) (f lt,vln,harp) 


Ser i a I 
Month j 
issued 

442 

Mar 15 

443 

Nov 14 

444 

Dec 14 

445 

?? 

445 

Nov 14 


matrix a r t i s t s 

* National Guards Band 


The Ackroyd Trio 


George Ackroyd flute 


417 9341V David de Groot, vln w.pno 

Oct 14 9331V " " " 


410 
Mar 14 

419 
Dec 14 

420 

Mar 14 

421 

Dec 14 


422 

Nov 14 


423 
Mar 14 


Carrie Lanceley w.p 

National Guards Band 
Ceredig Walters w.p 

National Guards Band 

National Symphony Orch. 
National Guards Band 


"Thais" - Meditation (Massenet) 

Chanson Triste (Tchaikovsky) 

Un peu d' amour (Silesu) 

The Holy City (Stephen Adams) 

The soul's awakening (Haddock) 

Under the British Flag - Part 1 
" " " " - Part 2 

The wonnerful wise Man o' Tawnton(K. Russel I ) 
The Vicar of Bray (McFarren) 

"A midsummer night's dream" - Wedding March 
(Mendel ssohn) 

"Madame Cherry" - Intermezzo (Hoschna) 

Loyal to King, march (Prescott) 

"Athalie" - The war march of the priests 
(Mendelssohn) 


J. H. Scotland - dramatic recitations, acc. piano 

The green eye of the Little Yellow God 
(Ml I ton Hayes) 

" " " Gunga Din (Rudyard Kipling) 

yd flute, soprano and violin) 

"Lucia di Lammermoor" - Mad scene (Donizetti) 
Somewhere a voice is calling (Tate) 

a)Lad wi'the plaidie b)Cawdor Fair (trad) 
a)Craigmi I lar Castle strathspey 

b)Arthur's Seat Reel 

The Admiral's Broom (Bevan) 

The Bo 'sun's Lament (W.H. Squire) 


424 



The Ackroyd Trio (G.Ackrc 

Mar 

14 


H 


425 

9201 A 

James Brown, accordeon 

1914 ' 

915 1 A 

" " 


425 



Robert Howe 

w.orch 

Oct 

14 


" 

" 

426 

882CS Mark Sheridan 

w.orch 

Mar 

14 

879CS " 

" 

427 



Gerald Hazard 

w.orch 

Mar 

14 


" 

•» 

428 



Daisy Taylor 

w.orch 

Mar 

14 


" 

" 

429 



Leighton Gosforth 

w.orch 

Mar 

14 


" 

" 

430 

905BM 

National Guards Band 


Mar 

14 

953BM " 


431 



Daisy Taylor 

w.orch 

Nov 

14 


" 

" 

432 



Robert Howe 

w.orch 

Oct 

14 


" 

" 

433 



John Glover, cornet 

w.orch 

Oct 

14 


" " 

" 

434 

871 IM 

The Ackroyd Trio 


Oct 

14 

.873IM " 


435 



Carrie Lanceley 

w.pno 

Oct 

14 


" 

" 

436 

1040BM 

National Guards Band 

Oct 

14 


" 


437 



National Guards Band 


Oct 

14 


H 


438 



National Guards Band 


Oct 

14 


" 


439 



Ceredig Walters 

w.pno 

Oct 

14 


" 

" 

440 



J .H. Scot 1 and, dramatic rec 

Oct 

14 


M 


441 

9941V 

David de Groot viol 

1 in 

Nov 

14 

993 P 

j " " 



2095 

titles & composers 

The Guards Patrol (A.Williams) 

Tipperary March (S.Douglas) 

Angel's call - serenade (Braga) 

Whisper and I shall hear (Piccolomini ) 


Orpheus Clarinet Quartette Andantino 
" Scherzo 


1081 BM National Guards Band 
1082BM 

Murray Ashford 


446 1045MBe Herbert Heyner 

Nov 14 1046MBe " 


Helen Blain 
National Guards Band 


Robert Howe 


447 

Nov 14 

448 

Nov 14 

449 

Nov 14 " 

450 Robert Howe 

Nov 14 " 

451 1009-1 ON F.J. Middleton 
Dec 14 101 0-1 ON 


The Guards Patrol (A. Williams) 

Tipperary March (S.Douglas) 

When bright eyes chance (Hedgecock) 

The Maid of Malabar (Stephen Adams) 

w.pno We're all plain civi I ians(Ernest Hastings) 
" Fall in! (Begbie,Cowen) 

w.orch Our Island Home (Trelawney) 

" Your King and Country want you(Paul Rubens 

Episodes in a soldier's life, part KKappey 
" " " " " part 2(Kappey 

w.orch Men of England (Capel) 

" Who's for the Flag? (K. Russell) 

w.orch The Union Jack of Old England (C.Williams) 
" Soldiers of the King(J. Ord Hume) 

organ Marche Joyeuse 

" Andantino 


How are you? (Judge) 

Sea (Long) 

I'm going back to Carolina ( Downs, Erdman) 
Good-bye summer, so- long fal I (Maloney, Wenrich) 

Angus, teach me to tango (A. Glover) 

Popsy Wopsy (B. Scott, Mills) 

If I could only make you care (J. Schmid) 
That's how I need you (Piantadosi) 

Quickfire March (Whitlock) 

The 3rd. Dragoons March (J.Brophy) 

Will ye no come back, Geordie? (Stephens) 

John o' Groats (Burley, Bull) 

A sergeant of the line (W.H. Squire) 

The corporal's ditty (W.H. Squire) 

I hear you calling me (C. Marshall) 

Somewhere a voice is calling (Tate) 

Serenade (Schubert) 

Serenade (Gounod) 

Cornin' thro' the rye (trad.) 

Robin Adair (trad.) 

Carry On - patriotic march (J. Ord Hume) 

The British landing in France- descr(W. Norman) 

a) Private Tommy Atkins, march (W.H.Myddleton) 

b) The soldiers of the King. march (J.Ord Hume) 
Our Blue Jackets-nava I patrol (Meacham,Rimmer ) 

The Dead March in "Saul" (Handel) 

Marche Funebre (F. Chopin) 

Up from Somerset (Wilfred Sanderson) 

I don't suppose (Trotere) 

ations, acc. piano- 
The portrait (Owen Meredith) 

Devil - may - care (C. H. Taylor) 

Concerto romantique - canzonetta (Godard) 

Mazur (Mynarski) 


452 

Jan 15 

453 
Dec 14 

454 
Jan 15 

454 

Mar 15 

455 

Dec 14 

456 
Dec 14 

457 
Dec 14 

458 
Dec 14 

459 
Dec 14 

460 
Jan 15 

461 

Jan 15 

462 
Jan 15 

463 
Jan 15 

463 
Mar 15 

464 
Jan 15 

465 

Jan 15 

466 
Jan 15 
Jan 15 

467 
Jan 15 

468 
Mar 15 

469 
Mar 15 

470 
Mar 15 

471 

Mar 15 

472 
Mar 15 

473 

Mar 15 


National Guards Band 

Margaret Balfour w.pno 

National Symphony Orch. 

National Guards Band 
National Symphony Orch 


The boys of the old brigade, march(Myddleton ) 
My Regiment, march (Bl ankenburg ) 

Love's Coronation (F.Aylward) 

0, dry those tears (Teresa del Riego) 

Barcaro I I e ( Tcha i kovsky ) 

Girandola - graceful dance (Asch) 

The Little Drummer (Felix) 

Girandola - graceful dance (Asch) 


J. H. Scotland reel tat ion. Gunga Din (Kipling) 
" " An Old Bachelor 


Marathon Mixed Quartette 


a) La Brabaconne b)God save the King 

c) Russian National Anthem d)La Marseillaise 


The City Temple Choir w.org. 0 God, our help in ages past(Croft) 

" " Eternal Father, strong to save( Rev. Dykes 

The City Temple Choir w.org. Rock of ages (Redhead) 

" " Fight the good fight (Boyd) 

The City Temple Choir w.org. Nearer, my God, to Thee( Rev. Dykes) 

" " God moves in a mysterious way 


Dumont's Bijou Orchestra 
W. Ackroyd violin 

N N 

James Brown accordeon 


Un peu d' amour (Silesu) 
Eternelle Ivresse (Louis Gann£) 

L i ebes lied (Fritz Kre i s I er ) 
Guitarrerro (Drdla) 

Craigmlllar Castle (trad.) 

a) The lad wi' the plaidie 

b) Cawdor Fair(trad) 


Murray Ashford A Miss Ashton Farewell to summer (N. Johnson) 
My Dreams (P. Tosti) 


Arthur Kellet 
National Symphony Orch 


Helen Blain 
Carrie Lanceley 

Margaret Balfour 


Signor C. Lorenz i harp 
Yorke Bowen piano 

Robert Howe 
Tom F. Kinniburgh 


Herbert Heyner 
Helen Blain 

Helen Blain 
Marcus Thomson 
Marathon Vocal Quartette 
National Concert Band 


Regrets, waltz (T. F. Wade) 

Destiny, waltz (Sydney Baynes) 

"Serse" - Largo - Ombra mai fu (Handel) 

Parted (Paolo Tosti) 

"Faust" - When all was young (Gounod) 

A song of thanksgiving (F.AIIitsen) 

The rustle of Spring (Sinding) 

a) Scherzo In E Minor (Mendelssohn) 

b) Etude Migninne in D (Mendelssohn) 

The Longshoreman (Edward German) 

a) Gae bring to me a pint o' wine(trad) 

b) (Song of) The Cameron Men(trad) 

Simple aveu (Thomi) 

Ave Maria (Bach, Gounod) 

"Elijah" - It is enough (Mendelssohn) 

"Sosarme" - Rendi'l sereno a I clgl io( Handel ) 

There is a green hi 1 1, far away (Gounod) 
Nearer, my God, to Thee (Carey) 

Across the Far Blue Hill, far away(BI umenta I ) 
The Crusaders (Schubert) 

Sweet and low (Barnby) 

Annie Laurie (Lady J. W. Scott) 

"The Country Girl "-Select ion 1 (L.Monckton ) 

" " " Selection 2 (L.Monckton) 


END OF 10-inch 
RECORDS 


MARATHON 

LIST 



2096 


12-2001 
Nov 1 2 


12 - inch diameter, with issue dates. 


St. Hilda's Colliery Prze "William Tell" 
Band, cond. James Oliver " " 


Selection 1 (Rossini) 
Selection 2 (Rossini) 


12-2002. 201 0BM National Guards Band 
Dec 12. 2003BM * 


12-2003 
Dec 12 

12-2004 
Dec 12 

12-2005 
Dec 12 


National Guards Band 
National Symphony Orch. 
National Symphony Orch. 


1 2-2006. 2008B0 National Symphony Orch. 
Dec 12. 2006B0 " 


1 2-2007. 201 3BM National Guards Band 
Feb 13 2014BM 


"Raymond" - Overture (Thomas) 

"Poet and Peasant" - Overture (von Suppe) 

1812 Overture Solonelle (Tchaikovsky) 

"Die Walkurie" - (R. Wagner) 

"La Boheme" - Selection (Puccini) 

"Cavalleria Rusticana" - Selection (Mascagni) 

"Barber of Seville" - Overture (Rossini) 

"The Caliph of Baghdad" - Overture (Boieldieu) 

"Princess Caprice" - waltz (Leo Fall) 

Love and Youth, waltz (Lucas) 

Rienzi Overture, part 1 (R. Wagner) 

" " part 2 (R. Wagner) 


(Speed 80 rpm. 

2032 Margaret Balfour 
Oct 13 

2033 2077FCo. Helen Blain 
Oct 13.2078FCO 


Price 4s. Od. each) 

w.pno Kathleen Mavourneen (Crouch) 

" Three fishers (Hull ah) 

i.pno The Auld Scotch Songs (arr.J.F.Leeser) 

" a)Bonnie Prince Char I ie.b)Green grow the rus 

2034 2079BM Irwell Springs Band, Love and Labour, part 1 (Percy Fletcher) 

Oct 13.2080BM " cond. W.Nuttall " " " part 2 (Percy Fletcher) 

Brass Band Test Piece for Crystal Palace Band Festiva 
of 1913, played by the winners. 


2035 2081 BM 
Oct 13.2082BM 

2036 
Nov 13 


Irwell Springs Band 
" cond. W.Nuttall 

National Guards Band 


12-2008. 201 5B0. National Symphony Orch. "Carmen" 
Feb 13 201 6B0 " " 


Selection 1 (G. Bizet) 
Selection 2 (G. Bizet) 


2037 
Nov 13 

2038 
Nov 13 


National Guards Band 


1 2-2009 
Mar 13 

12-2010 
Mar 13 

12-2011 
Mar 13 


National Guards Band 


"lolanthe" - Selection (Sir A. Sullivan) 

" "The Pirates of Penzance" - Selection(Sull i van) 

National Symphony Orch. "The Miracle"-lnci dental music, pt.1 (Humperdinck) 
" " " " -Incidental mus I c,pt. 2 (Humperdinck) 

Tom F. Kinniburgh w.org. Nazareth (C. Gounod) 

" " Calvary (Rodney) 


2039 
Nov 13 


String Band of H.M. Royal 
Arti I lery, Woolwich, 

cond. E.C.Stretton 

National Symphony Orch. 
David de Groot's Orch. 


A Military Church Parade, part KJ.Ord Hume) 

" " " " ,part 2(J.0rd Hume) 

"Rigoletto" - Selection Part 1 (G. Verdi) 

" - Selection Part 2 (G. Verdi) 

"Patience" - Selection (Sullivan) 

"H.M.S. Pinafore" - Selection (Sullivan) 

"Tales of Hoffmann" - Selection KOffenbach) 
" " " - Selection 2 (Offenbach) 


"La Dame Blanche" - Overture (Boieldieu) 
"Madama Butterfly"- Sleet ion (Puccini) 


Arthur Joyce's Orchestra The Honeymoon Waltz (Hewitt) 

cond. A.Joyce(for dancing) Nights of gladness (Charles Ancliffe) 


2041 
Nov 13 


G i useppe Lengh i -Ce Mini 


12-2012 
Apr 13 


National Guards Band 


Grand Military Tattoo, part 1 (Saro) 
" " " part 2 (Saro) 


2042 2089MB. Tom F. Kinniburgh 
Nov 13 

12-201 3. 2024B0 National Symphony Orch. "The Flying Dutchman" - Overture, part 1 (Wagner) 2090BM " 


Apr 13 2025B0 " 

12-201 4. 2028BM National Guards Band 
May 13 2031 BM " 


- Overture, part 2 (Wagner) 


12-2015 
May 13 


National Symphony Orch. 


Amorettentanze, waltz (Gung'l) 

"Pique Dame" - Overture (von Suppe) 

"Casse Noisette" - Ballet suite (P. Tchaikovsky) 

a) Miniature overture b) Danse Arabe 

c) Dance of the sugar plum fairy 

d) Russian Dance - Trepak 


2043 
Dec 13 

2044 
Dec 13 

2045 
Dec 13 


National Guards Band 


George Ackroyd flute 


"Faust" - Salve dimora (C. Gounod) 

"Carmen" - Flower song (G.Bizet) 

a) True till death (Scott Gatty) 

b) ln cellar cool (Lennox) 

c) Rocked in the cradle of the deep( Knight) 

d) ln sheltered vale (D'Alquen) 

"Messiah" - Selection 1 (Handel) 

" Selection 2 (Handel) 

Carnival of Venice (arr. Steiner) 

Du liegst mir am Herzen (Boehm) 


12-2016 Herr W. Meyorwitz piano Sonata No. 14 in C Sharp Minor, Op. 27, No. 2 - 

("The Moonlight Sonata") 2 parts (Beethoven) 

2046 

12-201 7. 2035B0 Archibald Joyce's Orch. Always Gay, waltz(A.Joyce)("Evening News"waltz 3) Feb 14 
Jun 13 2036B0 cond. Archibald Joyce. Dreaming, waltz (A. Joyce) 


String Band of H.M. Royal "Mirella" - Overture (C. Gounod) 
Artillery, Woolwich "Romeo and Juliet" - Select ion (C. Gounod) 

cond. E.C.Stretton 


National Guards Band 


12-2018 
Jun 13 

12-2019 
Jun 13 

12-2020 
Jun 13 


National Guards Band 
National Symphony Orch. 
National Symphony Orch. 


"Les Huguenots" - Selection 1 (Meyerbeer) 

" " Selection 2 (Meyerbeer) 

"Faust" - Selection KCharles Gounod) 

" Selection 2 (Char les Gounod) 

"Casse Noisette" - Ballet Music (P. Tchaikovsky ) 

e)March of the toys f)Chinese Dance 
g)Reed pipe dance h)Valse of the flowers 


2047 2107BM National Guards Band 

Feb 14 . 2108BM 


2048 2099BM National Symphony Orch. 

Feb 14.21 00BM " 


12-2021 .2042 1 M Violin, Cello,iano Trio. Trio in F - part 1 (Niels W. Gade) 


Jun 13 2043 1 M 

1 2-2022. 2044BM National Guards Band 
Jly 13 2057BM 


12-2023 
Jly 13 


12-2024 
Jly 13 

12-2025 
Aug 13 

12-2026 
Aug 13 

12-2027 
Sep 13 


James Glover, cornet, with 
National Guards Band 
National Guards Band 

National Symphony Orch. 

•i 

National Guards Band 

National Symphony Orch. 

H.M. Royal Artillery Band, 
Wool wich, cond. E.C.Stretton 


" " " part 2 ( Niels W. Gade) 

"The Gondloiers" - Selection (Sir A. Sullivan) 
"The Yeoman of the Guard" - Selection (Sullivan) 

"Samson and Del i I ah"-Soft ly awakes my heart 
(Saint-Saens) 

"Les Huguenots"-Benediction of the Poignards 
( Meyerbeer ) 

"Peer Gynt"-Morn ing, &, Death of Ase (Grieg) 

" " -Anitra's Dance, & In the Hall of the 

Mountain King (Grieg) 


2049 
Dec 13 

2050 
Feb 14 


Giuseppe Lengh i -Cel Uni 


National Guards Band 


"II Trovatore" 


Selection, part 1 (G. Verdi) 
Select Ion, part 2 (G. Verdi) 

"TannhUuser" - Overture, part 1 (R. Wagner) 

" - Overture, part 2 (R. Wagner) 

Songs without words - part 1 (Mendelssohn) 
part 2 (Mendelssohn) 

"Les Cloches de Cornevi I le"-sel .1 (Planquette) 
" " " " ", sel.2 (Planquette) 


2051 2109MBe Herbert Heyner 

Feb 14. 21 lOMBe 


"William Tell" - Overture (Rossini) 
a)At dawn b) The storm 
c)The calm d) Finale 

Songs by Stephen Adams - Parts 1 and 2 * 

Nancy Lee(trombone solo), Star of Bethlehem 
(two verses cornet solo), The Midshipmite, 
(euphonium solo), Mona, They all love Jack 
The Holy City, The Maid of the mill. 

"Parsifal" - Vorspiel Part 1 (Wagner) 

" Vorspiel Part 2 (Wagner) 

"MIgnon"- Ah! Noncrevidi tu (Thomas) 

"La Boheme" - Che gel i da manina (Puccini) 

London Revue, Lancers, parts' 1 & 2 (arr. 
Warwick Williams)- Each record gives the figures 
complete with pauses and introductory bars to each 
figure, thus rendering it ideal for dancing purposes 
Among the twenty Items introduced are - Oh! I do 
love you my Orange girl; Way down south; Ragging 
the baby to sleep; It’s nice when you love a wee 
lassie; Hltchy Koo; Hold your hand out naughty boy 
Row, row, row; Jerry Jeremiah; The trail of the 
Lonesome Pine; Waiting for the Robert E. Lee. 

orch "Tannhauser" - 0 star of eve (Wagner) 

" "Faust" - Even bravest heart's (Gounod) 


2052 
Oct 14 

2053 
Mar 14 


Margaret Balfour w.orch 


Land of Hope and Glory (Edward Elgar) 
The Lost Chord (Sir Arthur Sullivan) 


National Guards Band 


1 2-2028. 2059BM National Guards Band 
Sep 13. 2068BM " 

1 2-2029. 2058B0 National Symphony Orch. Symphony No. 8 in B Minor. Schubert - 
Sep 13 2069B0 " "The Unfinished" - 2 parts 

2030 2006BM H.M. Royal Artillery Band, A Life on the Ocean Wave, part 1.(arr. Binding)- 
Oct 13.2007BM Wool wich, Cond. E.C.Stretton. (A life on the ocean wave(full band), The lass 

that loves a sai lor(clarionets). Black eyed 
Susan 'full band). The anchor's weighed 
(euphonium solo). The Bay of Biscay(fu!l band) 
part 2... Death of Nelson, Sailor's Hornpipe( Jack's the 
lad). Home, sweet home (cornet ),Ru I e Britannia. 

2031 H.M. Royal Artillery Band, "Light Cavalry" - Overture (von Suppe) 

Oct 13 Woolwich, cond. E.C.Stretton. "Masaniello" - Overture (Auber) 

For the first time on any records these Overtures are 
given complete - as written. Thoroughly in their element 
Royal Artillery Band are superb in "Light Cavalry", the 
brass effects throughout being magnificent. In "Masaniello" 
(also known as 'La muerte de Portici')the woodwind section 
is heard to greatest possible advantage. 


Reminiscences of England - Parts 1 & 2, arr. 
Dan Godfrey. Among the twelve are such standard 
favourites as = Barbara Allen; Sally in our alley; 
Tom Bowling; The keel row; Home, sweet home; Rule 
Britannia. 


2054 
Nov 14 

Giuseppe Lengh i-Cel 1 ini 
and H. Lane Wi 1 son 

"Mef istofele" - Se tu mi doni un'ora(Boito) 
"La Favor ita" - Duet from Act.1 (Donizetti) 

2055 
Dec 14 

National Guards Band 

Songs of the Army 
Songs of the Navy 

2056 
Dec 14 

Giuseppe Lenghi-Cel 1 ini 
" w.orch. 

"Rigoletto" - La donna e mobile (Verdi) 
" - Questa o quel la (Verdi) 

2057 
Dec 14 

Herbert Heyner w.orch 

"1 Pagliacci" - Prologue (Leoncavallo) 
"Carmen" - The Toreador song (G.Bizet) 

2058 
Nov 14 

National Guards Band 

Reminiscences of Scotland, pt.1 (arr Godfrey) 
" " " pt.2(arr Godfrey) 

2059 
Jan 15 

National Guards Band 

Reminiscences of Ireland, pt 1 (arr. Godfrey ) 
" " " pt 2 (arr Godfrey) 

2060 
Mar 14 

Helen Blain w. organ. 

."Messiah" He was despied (Handel) 
a)"Messiah" - He shall feed His f lock(Handel ) 


b)"Elijah" -0 rest in the Lord (Mendelssohn) 



2061 
Jan 15 


G i useppe Lengh i -Ce Mini 

2062 2125MT. Giuseppe Lenghi-CelMni 
Jan 15 2131MT. 

2063 


M Aida" - Celeste Aida (Giuseppe Verdi) 
"L'Elisir d'amour" - Una furtiva lagrima 
(Donizetti ) 

"L'Afr icana" - 0 Paradiso (Meyerbeer) 

"La Favorite" - Spirito Gentil (Donizetti) 


2064 Grand Symphony Orch. 

Mar 15 cond. E.St.G.Pett 

2065 Grand Symphony Orch. 

Mar 15 cond. E.St.G. Pett 

2065 2116MT. Giuseppe Lenghi-Cel I ini 
Mar 15.2117MT " 


2097 

"L'Ar lesienne"- Suite -Pre I ude( Bizet) 

" " a)Menuet,b.Cari I Ion 

(Bizet) 

"L'Ar lesienne"- Suite-Adagietto & Patorelle 
(Bizet) 

La voix des cloches (Luigini) 

"Mignon" - Addlo Mignon (Thomas) 

"I Pescatore di Perle"- 

Mi par I'udire Ancora (Bizet) 


INDEX OF ARTISTS ON MARATHON RECORDS 


Numbers 101 onwards are 10-inch discs 
Numbers 12-2001 onwards are 12-inch discs 
Numbers 2030 onwards are 12-inch discs 


Ackroyd, George, Flute/piccolo 
280 , 309 , 358 , 403 ,416, 2044 

Ackroyd, W. , violin 
461 

Ackroyd Trio, The 

G. Ackroyd, fluto, F. Weist-Hill, violin, 
Carlo Lorenzi, Harp. 

424, 434, 443 

Ashford, Murray, baritone 
445 463 

Ashton, Miss 
463 

Balfour, Margaret,contralto 


182, 

. 260, 

361, 453, 465, 

2032, 

, 2052 

Bayes, 

Harry 

- comic songs 



211 , 

, 229, 

230, 274, 289, 

366, 

370, 389 

Blain, 

Helen , 

, contralto 



300 

, 339, 

362, 404, 447, 

464, 

469, 470 


2033, 2060 

Bonnemain, Marcel, violin 
334, 359 

Bowen, Yorke, pianoforte 
466 

Brown, James, Scottish Accordeon Champion 
398, 411, 425, 462 

Carr, Robert, baritone 

110 , 111 , 112 

Cathedral Choir with Boys’ Voices( anonymous ) 

187 

Caws, Pen (Charles Penrose }, comedian 
188, 205 

Champion, Harry, comedian 
132, 157, 193 

Charman, Jack, baritone , comedian 

115, 116, 133, 134, 158, 265, 275, 393, 396 

City Temple Choir, The 
457, 458, 459 

Cove , Harry 

117, 170, 171, 207, 208, 209, 304, 393, 

Cromer, Flora, comedienne 
214 

Davies, Gwynne 
153, 252 

Dewey, Madam Maude, birds imitator 
382 

Draper, Charles, clarinet 
147, 231 

Oumont, Mr., violin 
468 

Dumont's Bijou Orchestra 
460 

0 U (3 — - Anonymous violin and flute, 107 

Elton, Fred, comedian 
159 

Forsyth, Pipe-Major Harold, bagpipes 
167, 324 

Fester, Eric, Tyneside dialect comedian 
233, 234, 235 

6ialdini, Guido, whistler (siffleur) 

282, 311 

Silroy, A, whistler 

(Originally credited as ’Madam Maude Dewey' 
382 

clover, James, cornet 

181, 242, 293, 433, 12-2033 

Socez, Senor Jos4, violin 

148 


Goodwright, Helen, contralto 
285, 297 

Gosforth, Leighton, singer 
212* 429 

Grand Symphony Orchestra 

cond. E. St.G.Pett,L.R.A.M. 

2064, 2065 

Gregory, Frederic, baritone 

152, 204, 209, 232, 245, 366 

Griffiths, Gwladys, singer 
270 

Groot, David de, violin 
310, 417, 441 

Groot, David de, orchestra 
332, 2039 

Harris, Gus, comedian 

’The People's Chorus Idol’ 

288, 303, 320, 321, 346, 395, 408 

Hayes, Emilia, mezzo-soprano 
200, 296, 337 

Hayman and Franklin, comedians 
251 

Hazard, Gerald, comedian 
409, 410, 427 

Heyner, Herbert, baritone 
316, 363, 446, 469, 2057 

Howe, Robert, baritone 


113, 

114, 

126, 127, 155, 

184, 

203, 

246, 

262 

272, 

299, 

317, 141, 342, 

386, 

387, 

425, 

432 

449, 

450, 

467 





Huxley , 

Gladys, serio-comic 





191, 

213, 

215 






Irwell Springs Band 

(1913 National Brass Bands Champions) 
350, 351, 2034, 2035 

Jones, Darbishire, viol incello 
149 

Jones, Ida, serio-comic 

(over-labelled later as Daisy Taylor) 

410 

Joyce’s Orchestra, Archibald, dance orchestra 
352, 353, 376, 2040 

Kellet, Arthur, tenor 

Soloist of St. Paul's Cathedral Choir 

183, 225, 245, 271, 463 

Kinniburgh, Tom F. , bass 

169, 388, 467, 12-2011, 2042 

Kirkby, Stanley, baritone 
108, 109 

Lanceley, Carrie, soprano 

124, 151, 261, 283, 325, 347, 418, 435, 464 

Lenghi-Cellini , Giuseppe, tenor 

2041, 2049 , 2054, 2056, 2061, 2062, 2066 

London Church Choir and Quartette, A 
344 

Lorenzo, Signor Carlo, harp 
424, 443, 466 

Lynne, Frank, comedian 
227, 249, 265 

Marathon Concert Party 
190 

Marathon Instrumental Trio 
401, 416 

Marathon Mixed Vocal Quartette 
456 

Marathon Ragtime Trio 
161, 162 


Marathon Vocal Quartette 

472 

Mars, May, serio-comic 
248,263,318 

May, Elda, soprano 
367 

Meier, E., violin 
198 

Merson, Billy, comedian 

131, 192, 206, 319. 373 
Meyrowitz, Herr, W. , pianoforte 

(Musical Director for Marathon Records) 
135, 269, 12-2016 
Middleton, F.J., organ 
451 

Moore, Vera, soprano 
201 

Murchie, Robert, piccolo 
381 

Murdoch, McKenzie, violin 
165, 166, 258 
National Concert Band 

473 

National Guards Band 


101 , 

102, 

118, 

119 

, 120, 

139, 

140, 

141 

142, 

162, 

163, 

164 

, 172, 

173, 

174, 

175 

176, 

177, 

180, 

194 

, 216, 

217, 

218, 

236 

237, 

238, 

241, 

253 

, 654, 

255, 

267, 

276 

277, 

278, 

290, 

291 

, 306, 

329, 

330, 

331 

354, 

374, 

375, 

376 

, 379, 

383, 

386, 

391 

412, 

413, 

419, 

421 

, 422, 

430, 

436, 

437 

438, 

442, 

445, 

448 

, 452, 

454, 

12-2002, 

12-2003, 

12-2007, 

12-2009, 12 

-2012, 

t 

12-2014, 

12-2018, 

12-2022, 12. 

-2023, 

i 

12-2025, 

12-2028, 

12-2036, 12 

-2037, 


2043 

, 2047, 2050, 

2055, 

2058, 

2059 



National Scottish Orchestra 


322, 

323 

, 326 , 

327, 

372, 

372 



National Symphony 

Orchestra 




103, 

, 104 

, 121, 

122, 

123, 

143, 

144, 

145, 

178, 

, 179 

, 195, 

196, 

197, 

219, 

220, 

239, 

240, 

, 241 

, 256, 

257, 

> 268, 

279, 

292, 

308, 

331, 

, 356 

, 378, 

390, 

414, 

415, 

421, 

454, 

463, 

, 12-2013, 

12-2015, 12-2019, 12- 

-2020 

12- 

2026 

, 12-2029, 

2039, 

2048, 

, 397 



Nicol, Anderson, tenor 
301, 314, 338 

Noble, Yolande, serio-comic 
129, 130 

Oakley, Oily. ’King of the Banjoists’ 

221, 244, 335, 380 

O'Brien, Gerald, tenor 
128, 154, 202 

Opferman, Victor, violin 
105 

Orpheus Clarinet Trio 
444 

Parsons, Phil, comedian 
228, 264 

Paterson, W. flute 
367 

Penrose, Charles , comedian- see "Pen-Caws" 

Platt, Wilfred (?or, Wilfrid), bass 
156, 247 

Powell, Frank, comedian 
250, 302, 345, 269 

Ritte, Philip, tenor 
125 

Roselli, Angelo, tenor 
312, 313, 336, 360 

Royal Artillery Band, Woolwich, H.M. 
Conductor , E . C . Stretton 
305, 328, 12-2027, 2030, 2031, 2046 

Royal Artillery String Band, Woolwich, H.M 
Conductor, E. C. Stretton 
355, 377, 392, 2038 

Rushforth, W., bells 
375 


2098 


St. Hilda's Colliery Prize Band 
Conductor, James Oliver 

(1912 National Brass Bands Champions) 
137, 138, 180, 12-2001 

St. Paul's Cathedral Choir, London 
185, 186 

Sarmiento, Madame, soprano 
283 [second use] 

Schofield, Joseph, violincello 
243, 261, 266, 295, 333, 402 

Scotland, J. H., recitations 
440, 455 

Sheridan, Mark, comedian 
400, 407, 426 

Stuart, Mary, contralto 
342 

Tapiero, Professor Moise, ocarina 
199, 223, 259, 


Taylor, 

Daisy, serio-comic 

Walters, Ivor, tenor 

368, 

394, 410, 428, 

431 

284 

[410 

initially issued as "Ida Jones"] 

Weist-Hill, F. violin 

Thomas , 

Thomas 


424, 443 

224 



Whitehead, Percy, baritone 

Thomson 

, Marcus, baritone 

365, 406 

206, 

340, 364, 385, 

471 

Whitlock, Billy, xylophone 

TRIOS 

— Anonymous — 


136, 150, 222, 294, 357 

violin, 
violin , 

' cello , flute, 
'cello, piano, 

107 

12-2021 

Wilson, H. Lane, bass 
2054 

Turner, 

Alan, baritone 


Wootton, Vera, serio-comic 
ISO 

168 

, 204, 226 



Twain, Olive, "society" entertainer 
189 


Walters, Ceredig, baritone 

272, 273, 287, 293, 315, 343, 348, 349, 
399, 405, 406, 420, 439 




Jo* 




RECORD-BREAKING 
MARATHONi 
RECORDS. 




16 minutes 25 seconds 


Is the playing time of 
12-inch disc No. 2042. 

Mr. T. KINNIBURGH. Basso. Piano Accomp. 

2042 (») True Till Death ; (b) In Cellar Cool. 

(a) Rocked in the Cradle ; (b) In Sheltered Vale. 

F OUR complete songs, two on each side, reproduced with 
that wonderful naturalness which has resulted in 
“ Marathon ” Records being described as “ The Records with 
the Soul Preserved.” The actual playing times at SO revs, per 
minute are : — 

True Till Death ” 3 min. 55 seconds. 

“ In Cellar Cool ” 4 minutes 30 seconds. 

“ Rocked in the Cradle ” 3 minutes 45 seconds. 

“ In Sheltered Vale ” 4 minutes 15 seconds. 


12 minutes 25 seconds 


On a 10-inch disc is an equally 
marvellous achievement in 
recording. This is the playing 
time of 10-inch No. 388. 

Mr. T. KINNIBURGH. Basso. Piano Accomp. 

388 The Bellringer. 

' The Village Blacksmith. 

The actual times at SO revs, per minute are : — 

“ The Bellringer ” 6 minutes 40 seconds. 

“ The Village Blacksmith ” 5 minutes 45 seconds. 

T HESE amazing records are absolutely unequalled as a 
recording achievement. They conclusively prove that not 
only does the purchaser of “ Marathon ” Records get more 
music, but he gets infinitely better music. 





Miss Helen Blain 



Mr. Ceredig Walters 



Miss Margaret Balfour 



2099 



STANDARD OF RELIABILITY AND VALUE. 


2100 



V* 

<a 


ns , 

c 


~a 

V- 

O 


-D 

C 


E 

3 

-o 

<u 

C 


co .« — 


~ 3 

(A O 

'H * 

c vu 

O 

4) 


. — a> 
o * 


o 

_c 


J2 3 


a 

Q 

c 

o 

-C C/3 

2 w. 

S3 g 

s « 

oc 


no — 
.£ "3 
00 

-o c 

<u ^3 


cq *: 

v 

c 

5 ”S 

0) O 

_C 

CO U 
(/) 4-1 

<U (0 

E E 
<8 _ 
V O 

CO 4-» 

o >, 
u P 
.2 « 
Q, 00 

o 

<U -C 


I'D O £ 
I V* 

2 ° 

cc 

0 

1 


-C __ 
. - *0 

> CO 

> >4 


.s ^ 

Lu 


c 

4> 

-c 

4-* 

00 

c 

JU 

T3 

C 

tc 


'V 

4) 

V 

2 


c 

o 

JG 


D 

a 

w 


CON 

i « 
i rv- 

co 3 
>- o. 


CO 


(0 

2 


c 

o 

4) 

co 

D 





E 

o 

CO 

ns 

c 


Cd 3 

C 

° E 

J sD 

-O . 

I J 


_C co 
co 00 
*.m C 

IS ^ 

CQ -3 

, o 

^ E 


-a 3 
oo -jQ 

• E ns 

-c c 


a 


on 

c 


~Z a 

‘5 5 

§ * .= 

TS T3 +- 


00 

c 


0 
C/5 

1 

H 

U 

z 

E 

c 

u 


c — -S’ 


- “ 
m c 

I ig 


•3 

w. 

O 

-a 

e 


o 

_Q 


ns 

« 

c 

and 

yed. 

M 

’« 

<0 

ns 

k- 

00 

J a 

S 

0 

T3 

<0 *-3 

u 

i 

u 

“u 

c o 

Wi *- 

h 

£ 

3 

3 

ce 

c 

ns 

. v-> 

O 

>» 

V 

o g 

VJ-* 

>k 

' — 4) 

O 


3 

<0 

0/ 

CQ 


a 

3 

Q 

c 

o 

pJG , 


^ Oh 


ro c 

~:s 


•|-S s 
e « 
e 


2 

QC 

c 

ui 

z 

o 

H 


X 

o 

S3 

a 

z 

3 

O 

in 


oc 


a ._ 
" 3 


.2 

-r. e 


co 


a-S 

o 


u 

-O .- 
v <= 

£ 

"jt 

l_c Op 


C -O 

Q | 

zT 3 
a i 

X 


r 


h 

z 

u 

s 

a. 

a| 

u 


"in 


a> 

X 

*4 

e 

£ 

00 

C 

J) 

n3 

c 

td 


ns 

4) 

4) 

2 


c 

c 

M 


a 

s 


<0 2 

>- a. 


w "3 


4) 

w 

D 


2101 






05 

a 

3 

c n 


rC C 

“ 5(5 

O 

. • _C 

<u 2 

33 £ 

o 


c o 

qj co 

u 

J-£ V4-. 

C O 
5(5 

<5 4_) 

C <U 

c .£ 
.22 i-5 
IE CO 
*3 u 


05 05 

"a -£ 
E 
* £ 

c 

•- ,£P 

* to 
-Q 4) 
05 33 
-C 

.2 c 
c *~ 
<-G 

>,-2 

3 1o 
<-*- ca 

•- -M 

M "O 

« e 

_a is 


i> . 
-£ £ 
- S 
> > 

~3 _c 

c 
o 


£ O 

c 

co '-a 
50 o> 

o 


to 


u 

3 


3 P *- 

G CO 


3 

cr 

3 fO 
3 .£ 
cO 

CO 4-> 

- _c 

o 


HD C 
05 O , 
JZ u ' 

• - >> 
c ~ 
u= "13 
A u 
§ 

2 c ■ 
a a; 


tO 'Tl 

~ C 
3 3 

O 
to 

33 

c 

cO 


O w 
c ^ 

E -Q 


1 O) 

c 

o 

05 

-G 


33 u 
• — to 

S .2 


05 73 
> -C 
50 £ 


c 

50 

C 

33 


.2 

C 

c0 

c0 



C4- 

to 

u 


o 

05 

3 

05 


33 

C 

£ 

33 

o 

'— 

a 

c 

o 

44 

: case 

o 

05 

to 




05 

_C 

V- 

3 

05 

_o 

44 

O 

O 

JZ 

44 

very 

3 

to 


4-* 

c0 

< 

05 

33 

-C 

44 

05 


CO 


~c 

05* 

e 

£ 

05 

44 


V. 


c 

X* 

3 

to 

v-*-i 

o 

^3 

o 

C 

to 

’o 

J3 

05 

> 




U 

3 

O 

>* 

«4* 

O 

45 


0) 

-c 

c 

45 

JC 

bo 

C 

J4 5 

33 

C 

(4 

(A 

J) 

-5 

05 

05 

2 


c 

o 

M 

rt 

V. 

cd 


c 

0 

05 

u. 

D 


3 



o 

3 

_* 

IS 

O 


£ CO 

s •• 

s t- 


-O 

3 

o 

-a 


-a 

c 


3 

CJ 


'-C 

>> 


3J 

c 


«J — 

—r nj *TJ 


— _D 
5 O 

£ 33 


a: 


•T 0> 

-a a 

e >, 


2 c+* 


JC 

44 

£ 



(A 

-o 

u 

o 

u 

45 

w 

u 

3 

o 

>> 


45 

M 


C 

45 

X 

bfl 

e 

4) 



C 

o 

■£ 

«d 

v. 

cd 

s 


>» 
” 5 
o 

S 

D 


2102 



0 

« >■ g 

— 05 cQ 

v <d 

"a; 

O 

0 X 

>* 

M 

CO 

C 

• • 
in 

rlay pan 
etc., e 
ered by 

^3 

'o 

05 

X 

(0 

-a 

<£ 0 

— " 4-» 

,, 05 

^T3 v- 
v O 
tj 0 

.2 

*5 

fi 

0 

*T3 

C 

Maratho 

n. 

records. 


g jtf s 

0 _Q U 

c 

CO 

C0 0 

"a OS 

CO 

• O 

• .« w. 

0 3 

• • 

(0 

72 c •- 

"3 

C 

Mm 

J* O 

C 

O 

dj fc 

in 

*J 3 J 

0 

z 

0 

"g 05 
3 05 

rS a 

X 

+■> 

cO 

« u *? 

u a 0 

53 

with 
dering 
rn orifi 

a 

>. 

h 

O 

> 

3 

CO 

05 «-m 

-O ^ 

CO 

"o £ « 

C «4 m 

*" C X 
05 

no a 45 
« 0 x 

0 

0 

• pM 

Vi 

c c 0 

.5? a-* 
s - « 

•« &H - 
" -S 

W 

(0 

V 

bo 

1 

£ 

iered arm 
, enabling 

X 

O 

X 

05 

►» 

CO 

05 

CU "t> 
o> e C 

cO 45 

05 X 

fl u M 

3 *c C 


-O ^ 05 

c * ep s 

<u c 
ax\sx 
. 2- • r tc *5 
X 

<-> -o 2 cq 

05 V 

>>S 6 . 

3 > _, "^3 
to n ~ Si 
6(1 2 4) C 
O CL •- 

% v 

E • *-£ 

o 


£ 

C /3 

bo 

c 


a Jt 

X 
3 
O 


2* «-• 


(U __ 
£ *0 
.5 £ 


c 3 

-S D 

£ J 

<o — £* 


a 

3 

Q 

c 

2 o» 

•5 -2 

to £ 


5 g 3 

« .E 

X ‘S) 


H 3 

S 

(0 

05 

J? 

T 3 


■2 - 5 ^ 

C 3 ^ 

£ *r ~ 

3 2 

Lm x 


-a x i 

X 05 . qv 

o *3 05 ^ 

05 j: 

H 
bl 

z 
5 
< 
u 


u u CL. 

° n I 
c « m I 

to _ *5 

H. o a q 

H 

O 


E 5 ; 

C - 
c * 

3 


~ s 
3 

fcS < 


13 2 , 


^ _o 


C 

•w 2 

s» •£ 


2 1. 

3 ' 

* Tj 5C 
_ u O 
-C >> 5S 

HI 

" f CO 
S a Q 

Z 

nee 

IPM 

3 

3 

0 

O 

05 

u 


0 

s 


c 

o 

45 

05 

D 



o • - 


fc-° 

> ^d 
. o> 

• V- 

U v 

« 5 


X *- 

2 05 

C.2 


-£ £ 
- o 


n3 X 


> — 05 

2^:2. 

a 

«sCQ 

.2 v 

- E 1 
■o-o E 
2 Xa 

-gy* 
2 5? S 
:0 5 


# 

H3 


£ 

C/3 


X 

-a 


00 

1 

6 
V* 

o 
£ 

T3 
« > 


C 

>5 


'T3 

5m 

O 


-o 

c 


c 

o 

X 


o 

x 


jo 

Ox 


Z ns 05 

C 

0-0 

-c u. - 


! C O 

■ o u 

• - 05 

uQi 
3 

■ ~D 1 

O 


- „ o 

o „ 

.h a s. 

T 3 >> 
c c 

• " <u — 

— g -~3 

o 

<u bfi 
&•?.£ 
“ «3 
O -C c 

53 .a S 


u 3 +- 


a 

X 

: # 


0 

CO 1—5 

bo 

E~ 

X 

c 

• 

C 

h 

M 

CO 

05 

~a 

cO 

bn' 

C to 

a 

n3 

3 

05 

’> 2 

05 

05 

M 

Q 

X 

‘5b 5! 

05 

"3 

05 

a 

(0 

c 

o 

cO 

4M 

c 

c ‘c ‘ 

5_ — x ' 


3 

0 

>5 

U- 

0 

4) 


V 

X 

4* 

c 

4) 

X 

-*-> 

M 

C 

J2 

-o 

c 

(0 


T3 

4) 

4) 

2 


-3 • 
£ C 

« *3 
> •“» 
C . 


x W 3 2 w 

* T! H e g> 

i- 8 - « 4 


ce: 2 * 


cO 1. 
£ X 
u > 0 

V H 
_2 Z 
ro u 

c CO 

d a 
z 

05 *m 
C Qm 

3 

3 

O 

O 

C/3 

U 


tN o ffl u 

o «3 05 

2* i 

s- *-0. 


c 

o 

4) 

05 

3 


2103 



J? 


v 

c 

o 

-a 

a 

o 

£ 

<0 

v* 

00 

>* 

c 

cd 


c 

O £ 


"8 

44 

O 

3 

V. 

4-> 

CO 

C 

O 

u 


<d 

cd 


a ^3 

c 


4) 

-D> 

c 

cd 

u 


O 

u 

4) 

OZ 


c 

o 

-C 


3 

o 

C/5 


e 

o 

CO 

a; 

C 

IB 

u 

cd 

E 


CO 

4> 

<d 

E 


cd 

c 

cd 


-jC 


o 

v-> 

a 

4) 

V. 


co r; V- 4) 

*0 «5 O ,-m 

.— *•3 4 Cl 


u 

4) 

-4- 

k- 

4> 

a 


"3 

4i 


o 

CQ *t: 


y 

<L) 


4) 

-13 


V 

~0 

«d 

£ 


cd 

o 

_ <-E ^3 

— • — Vh 


pJC 


J>* 

'c 

O 


4) 

-c 


5 •« -8 


o 

u 

CD 


"T3 

C 


o 

Z 


X 

o 
_a 

”3 

c 
3 
O 

C/5 c-C 


c 

o 

-C 


00 

flj __ — 


i 2 

^ k- 4-4 


4) 

> 

a 

-a 


w 

X 

- 

CO 

CO 


cu 

k* 

o 

4-» 


4> 

• 

CO 


«s 

O 

k. 

c 

E 


s- 

*4 

cd 

o 

00 


d 

s 

CO 

4 ; 

a 

>» 

4-» 

They 

-C 

4-4 

2 

cd 

cd 

k4 

-C 

a 
. 2 

-C 

4-4 

44 

3 

O 

4) 

-C 

4-4 

44 

c 

D 

44 

w. 

o 

-JC 

00 

3 


V-. 

4; 


^ C— * 

o 

'-t— 

4) 


O 


V- 

o 

yg 

k- 

cd 

c 

4) 

-C 

44 

CO 

C 

cd 

>- 

E 

.2 

*44 

co 

3 

4) 

"T3 

4) 

p 

4) 

y 

4> 

cd 

E 

o 

M- 

-c 

44 

-13 

k* 

cd 

E 


4) 

4J 

T5 

'£ 

cd 


a g 

4_J 3 

to 00 
_g c4= 

£ 
O 


Of- 


-*-• -jC 

CO 

C 
cd 

E 


-3 
6 
c 

cd 

a 

4-» ^ 


c 

4) 

4) 

_Q 


cd 

■£ 4) 

co 
C 
S 
a 
x 

CD 


4) 

-C 


u 

cd 


4> 

-JC 



-c: 

.o 

-5 

3 


4) 

•S 

~E 

o 

3 


^ M CO ^ 


0 

Z 

x 

o 

M 

TJ 

C 

3 

O 

C/5 


0 0 0-5 

Z Z Z 0 


h 

3 

O 

•» ». «. <4. 

0 


4) 

<5. 

5 


4) 


4) _ • 

■*5 "T3 
a Qj 
■*- v. 

*° *3 

o o 

■*- 4) 


5 * 
3 © 

3 ;§ 

.2 C 
~ 3 
— O 

— Co 
§*: 
-I § 

2 -c 
® a 

5 4 




c 

o 

X 

4-4 

<d 

u 

(6 

s 


"O 

c 

cd 


E 

cd 
v- 

j a 


H3 

C 


- 4> 

S'? 
_§ e 

a > 
o £ 

4) 

c 


e 

4) 

E £ -C 
M 
C 
4) 


C 

cd 


e 4) 

o « e 
-C 5 ® 
a 2 jc 

o -S o- 

e O. u 

E O u 


= nQ 

-O 
C 
cd 


jQ 

E 

3 


2! 

z 


c 

o 

JB 

44 

cd 

t- 

cd 

s 


~G 

0 


o « 

(J Cu 


^ 3 



o 

"S 2-3 

H3 V C 

sun 

~0 0) 
1> _Q 

>» 

CO 

g CO 

• • 

*r c CO 
o a 

CC 

O 

c 

-5 

2 -3 

*i k. 

CD 

U- QJ -* 

-S2 o 
. *T3 ^ 

bfl 

c 

k. . 

CO 

"T3 v- 

OJ o 

•O U 

w. 

O 

HD 

C 

<o O 

)z • 0 

£ c j; 

2.0*" 

• • 

: inlay 
Oxy 
c fret' 

cl or 
co c 

j j 

"aa 

2’ u o 

CO 

c 

o 

>r. 

roduct 
f your 

CD 

ndsom( 

access. 

artisti 

3 »- 
O _ 

^ c 

qj 

3 co 

V*- <U 

*D a 

3 >> 

to *4 

V 

-C 

to 

co 

3 £ 0 

^ 

c <u — 


-“S s 

-r 

*3 

a-S 

I 4) 

-Q C3 
co 

E $P 

2! 

- % . 
"2-a - 

4) 

9 \ 

.ti ^ >» 

> <0 _D 

> 4J 

s a 

u C 
O «0 

v- c 
co L3 
-O 

— (Tt 

both 

g c e 

2- " S 

.. j: J? 


u 

CU 


co 

H3 

v. 

O 

u 

4) 


4i 

a 


CO 

k- 

4) 

C 

v-, 



Qu 


a 

3 

a 

c 

O « 
*£ 

S O 

s a 


X 

o 

QQ 

a 

z 

D 

O 

cn 


2 *- c 

3 


u .3 


no 

C do M 
ca c « 


3- J 

S c Z 

5 ^ * 

if -c 'c 
H o 

-T 3 JS 


CM 


H 

2 

U 

S 

0. 

5 

o 

u 


t n cd 

o k, 

~ j 

s s 


2 ►. 

u C 

a o 




2104 



Jj -3 
Q. l> 

>. O 

v a 
> 

«y X 

■8| 
”1 
C 3 
S 2 

O Jjj 

-a -0 . 

u u-o 

>. D o 

3 


« 

_Q 


O <0 

5 -j= 5 

fn /~n 


o . 
P' 

2 « 
60 *j 
18 

o *- 


> Jj-d 
2-c c 
E - * 

£«-. m 

bb 0 JJ 
>, 

Mm CO 4-4 

“» 3 "3 
a.y.e- 
>> t; y 
■" <3 £ 
a C 
Ta_ a 
-"a S 

2 5 ! 


C.S 
o’tS 

CL 

12 (U-O 

ox< 

0 +* 

•) - 

s •; o 

g * - 

1 S 2 

O W 


~d 

(0 


E ~ 


oo bo 
c 

o *C 

-M W 

!|S 

10 t c 

« o u 

J- Q.-P 

5 E * 

*3 2 is 

<3 

V C V 

: S fc -° 

C-£'"o 

2 . u . 

■5-a-S J 

<8 c 

^ 4-» C 

' -0 
S • E 

^ CO *0 

<u 


£ 

O 


C 

£ 


4> 


** n \ <o 

c y d 

O E.y 


(6 

N 

v 

u 


<p <fi <£> 

N n n 


D 

c 

o 

4-* 

<U 

C 

o 

mC 

a 

o 

E 

o 

X 

~0 

c 

cd 

£ 

o 


o 
u 

"3 
Q 

*TJ 

O 

E 

£ 

ii 

c 
"■a 
c . 
<o . 

<u 

C £ 


aj 

"0 

O 

E 

<u 

c 


. — CO 

a c 


£ £ Jlj IS a 
^ & a | £ 
.E g -5 2 
-J M O CJ 


O 

H 


J* bo 
■£.£ 

V- X 
O <Q 
*■*- C 


4) CO 

pjC « 


1) 

> 


< D 9 U Q 

u 

o 

44 • • • 

a o o o 

« Q Q Q 

< 


t.E 

"2-e 

o.« 

. 2 "a. 

a 
£ 3 
O t/J 

a,2 
« . 

3 O 
< a-3 
c « « 
u “O >» 
-c<m2 

O' 

■SQ^ 

c. -o 


V.[— I u 
« 

" Q ► ° 

u 5 n 
S °T3 
° 

§.2o; 

W> u_ 

O 5*0 

■£§•«« 
-5 w 
*— < >, 


bo 


So 

^ v p 
t : mQ v- <u 
O w 

. M mC 3 O 

J 5 w *•* 

' O d) 

3^ 0^C"3 
«-D S- «j 

*“ 3JJ-3 s 

^ J |t . 

U 8 i- 2 1 

-m ■y-i 1 ^ 

« ? g “* E 

3 3 5 O 3 

« O' vL C 

• r c cn to -jC 3 

60 £ C .. 60. E 

<8 © w‘C P 

£ i » b 

O C * t) D 

■y o T3 S. « -y 

0. M c u _C 3 

J . •■5-1 
< 

0^-0 
y c 

£ •* c <8 
-o 3 _ 
— o b 
s pjs 

£ *• D. £ 

£ c OS ’ 

~ o e i2 

M <0 ->^ 2 S 


o o 

> 4— » 

o 

-Q tJ 

cd -C 

0) 

mC 


. - < 

: _q 


-e,* S °^2 *. 

^ K 


2 

O 

X 

Q 

O 

o 


DC 

UJ 

H 

cn 

< 


cn 
D 
5 

3 — D « 

.o u as: -Q - 

•r v- *• 

3 O V D V 
-9 CjC-CJ 

O U 4 -* 4 -» 4 -» 


* cd • 

' _n u 

co 


S 

a 

o 

a 


o 

4_j cd 

c/} 

Sjc 

oe-ti O 
'-C ^ co 

U C 
-C OJ V; 

5* C o 

°DC 

. 4J 


>% • 

3--o 

cd u O 

c.a o 


.2 

4-* _ ^ 

co JI3 
« 3 O 

cr ■*-* 

C Cd v 

3 -8 

£ 

C ^0 co 

r cd 
O.tJ-C 

3C r: 

u 

nd ii ‘J~ 

O <L) -J 

o a > 

^ 5- 

cd 

_ ^ 4-» 

■3 = ^ 
■P u-rt 


3U= 

S ‘-5 
-a S 


• c« 


0) 
c 

H . | 

-o 33 
C O 

15 E 


CO 

<-rt 


~0 
v 
-G 
. 10 
*E 

«-C 

o 

c 

cd 


>» 

c 

cd 

bo 

o 

-C 

cd 


o 

cd 

o 


o 

co 

e 


o 

>» 


c£ 


9) 

JG 

C 

0) 

X 

4-* 

M 

c 

4) 


a, - 


c 

cd 

« 

_4) 

-T3 

4) 

2 


c 

o 

X 

15 

»- 

cd 

s 

j* 

•a 

o 

4) 

U9 

D 



cd 

• p4 

o 

0) 

a 

C/) 




•» 

< 

cn 

X 

UJ 

> 

2 

D 


nd c 
c •- 

^ c 
c £ 
*c W 

4) 

§ < 

u 


C/5 


co 


g "2 

E S 

e 

S 


II 

4-4 o 

.5 >; 
o ■ M 


J) 
bo 
c 

cd 

mC 4- 

bo 

3 2 

O M 

^ ° 
-Q u 

05 4) 

-Q -JC 

4-4 

>» — ‘ 
cd T3 

P c 

C cd 
-C 
X 

O V 
_□ -C 

-o 

s ^ 
§ ° 
co E 


co > C 

fe 

> jo 

*E o- 

D ^ 
c 
o 


2 

cd 


u 

h : 

CO 

O 

E 


V 

4-4 


X 

4-4 

4) 



a 


c 

'O 

sim 


*4-4 

cd 

cd 


4-* 

>» 

^13 

CO 

3 

X 

.2 

4-4 

33 

c 

cd 

* ^ 

.2 

E 

bo 

*.M 

o 

4-4 

c 

’>» 

* CO 

O 

a 

3 

cd 

c 



cd 

^T3 

~a 

a 

V 

G 

E 

V- 

3 

o 

*3 

O 

Mm 

u 

O' 


V 

4) 


cd 

V* 

bo 



G 

4) 

4) 


X 

-X 

4) 

n 



c 

ft 

1 

co 

co 

CO 

CO 

vJ 

X 

4) 

pjl 

o 

O 

irj 

in 

4-1 

cd 

. 2 


H 



v« 

cd 

‘E 






*> 

cd 




<+< 

-TJ 

C 

cd 

u 

X 

CO 

1 

i 

i 

1 

4-1 

.E 

*o 

4) 

a 

>» 

V* 

3 

1 

CN 

i 

Tf 

CO 

sO 

in 

cd 

O 

Mm 

d 

o 

CO 

O 

CO 

O 

co 

v« 


Z 

z 

z 

z 


4) 

> 

‘E 

D 

c 

o 


V 

4-4 

4) 

"a 

E 

o 

U 


c 

4) 


3 

0 

►* 

<44 

0 

4) 


4) 

X 


bfl 

e 

4) 


u 
. 2 


E 





"S- 


3 

c 




T3 

C 

a 


4-4 

CO 

* 

J 


cd 

3 


c 




M> 

CO 






_4 







t 3 

are 


c 

0 

-X 




CJ 

4) 

2 



Id 




5 

X 

0 

-a 


u 

cd 

S 

: 



c 

0 

X 

-a 

c 


O 

4-4 




cd 

h 

id 

3 

O 


"0 




2 

cn 


4) 




3 



•p 

44 

»> 

•* 

•> 

V 

: 


cX 




ft 

’c 

X 

. 

•j> 




0 

JV 

-0 

< 




4) 

m 

3 

4) 

44 

cd 

T 

1 

| 

1 

(A 

D 

Q 

”a 

< 

OQ 

U 

Q 




2105 






c n 

Q 

QS 

0 

u 

u 

06 


2 

O 

DC 

H 

< 

£ 


<s 

I- 


« 


S 


</) 2p 
co . 3 
•-5 0> 

-J .3 


4-J 

CO 

CO 

<u 


72 

4-4 


cd 

’ CO 


0 ) 


-Q 

0 ) 


-3 

-3 

4-* 

U 


IS 

Vh 

O 


M— 


V- 

CO 

aj 

T3 

cd 


a 

O 

“3 

O 


V 

V- 

3 

OC 

O 

» 

>> 

* 


c 

-X 

0 

«o 

< 

J3 
— > 




J 


O 

<u 

• 

4-4 

-3 

44 

3 

V- 

3 

3 

<NJ 

O 

M— * 

CO 

a; 

cd 

-3 

4-4 

<u 

the 


w- 


3 

o 


3 

3 


£ 



cd 

S 

3 



>> 

c 



-fl 

3 

. 

• 


* c 

3 

-3 

-TJ 

- 

g 

.2 

*4-4 

a> 

-3 ^3 

5~ 


u 

2 " co 

3 


3 

3 t 



~3 

* T 

cd 


O 

rg xd 

V4- 

3 

3 

cd 

"o 

CO 

-3 

cd 

V- 

a 

<L> 

V- 

— p 

O 

Q 

E 


aj 



3 

Xd 


1 ) 

cd 

« 



CO 

V 

v-> 

qj 


cd 



co 

3 



"3 

CO 

1 — 

Cd 



k— 

0 J 

GO 


O 

3 


a 

a> 

OS 

-3 
. 2 
IS 

;> 

’ 60 


- 

£ 

4-4 

CO 


c 

CO 

co 

75 

^3 

o 

J3 

<U 

U 

o 

£ 

<u 

-3 72 

4-* 

•— 

_c 

U co 

3 

a 

u 

.£ i 

u 

cd 

4-* 

"cd 

V- 


s 

3 

<U 

*4 

cd 

u 

CO 

k-4— • 

- — 3 
O 

a 

5 

cu 

O 




CD 

M 




-a 

u 

o 

o 

0 


u 

3 

o 

>» 


D 

X 


c 

a> 

x 

"6 

c 

JU 

-a 

c 

cd 


J[ 

-13 

D 

a; 

Z 




c 

o 


cd 

•- 

<d 


2 


c 

o 

V 

D 


Q 'fi 
° 2 
o 5 
oS 

C/5 C/5 

< < 

S 8 

H H 


£ S 

Q 8 

UJ UJ 

w 2 


0 ) v- 

-c « 

4_) — C 


o "TS 
u . - 
a; > 

QS * 

: S 

c - 

2 w 

~ £ 
2 <a 
b <u 
«2 v - 


<D 3 

-3 2 

~ > 

.3 

o o 
x .2 

60 <D 

c =: 

05 u. 
X5 0J 
<u 

v- 7 

a; 


cd 

<u 


Go 


o 


w 

X 

H 

ft! 

O 

u- 


<U O 

■S C 
~ 1 
l J 8 


0J 0J 

nS =3 

oj 

1 ) 

-a z 

QJ 

2 -u. 

3 to 

HD « 

O c - 

E <-3 

a 

o 

a; "£ 

cd 

22 .1 

cd 4-* 

u 


a> 

3 

cr 

c 

3 


<U X 

> # u 

IS 
In s 


4) 

£ 2 

C 4) 
ro V 

a 7 

E Z 

rS B 

U o 

-C 


3 

O 

CO 

HD 

V* 

The 

ed 

u 

cd 

aJ 

cd 

V- 

cd 

a; 

O 

y 

9 


s 

co 

c 


OS 


5 

o 


u I 

_c .c 

■*■' ' 3 

44 

V- XD 

o o 


qj 

TJ qj 

OJ 4-J 
v- CO 

1 J 

‘“P 60 

§ u3 

E -M 

CO 

. OJ 

cd qj 

*U X 

aj -m 

a 

CO £ 

o 

co *-• 


^ e 

^3 cd 
<D Q, 
W C 

Z c 

o 

. u 
'b g 

2 O 


O -*r JJ 
*4 o hd 
cd 

Go <u c 

c *-*- 3 


-3 

60 

3 

o 


_ c 2 


GO 

<U 

-Q 

E 

o 


2 ! - 
« c 

CO P 


CO 

g =3 
S 4J 

co 7 
u. 

a : 


(U 


c; 

brj 

cd 


2 o g 

S -S -C 

3 cd *.» 

O cd 

4-» 5- 

cd 


"3 

C 

cd 

~3 

O 


^ O 


Q, w § 
cj 3 ^ 
^ -D : 


cd 

Vn 

GO 

V 

co 

Tl 


cd 

Ui 

u 


<u 

u 

c 

u 


3 o ^ 


o -2 


cd Q< 
*3 O 
cd e 

S i 


O te 


1) 

n , -c 
22 H 
c '-S 
o c 

« M 


T3 

22 "H 
2 o 

U« U 

E ^ 

£ DS 


Jg 1 

H 1 

cd 

z 


o J ”H 

z -I 8 

> QJ 

• . QC 

piJ -3 
M C 3S 
cd D cd 


>> 

cd bo 

■8 J 

a 

CO 

CO -E 


-Q 

cd 

C 


t-4 

o 

-o CD 

k-*— 

qo co 

-X 

co 

cd 

8 8 

Z 2 

CM CNJ^ 


= u 

<L> 
V 

z 


3 

o 

-3 


O 

u 

<D 


GO 

3 ^ 

V 

> co 

.3 v 
GO O 

~3 
>. C 
w- cd 

<u 

> • co 

. ►» 40 


-3 ^ .2 
C v- co 
cd 2 3 

u 


qj 01 

X X 

4-1 4-J 

3 V 
*-2 ^2 
"cd 

>* > 

x> 

o 

«o x: 

is 

CO 

» 

4-* CO 

cd 

4-» • — 

Cd co 

X 3 
X 

4-4 

P C 

C qj 


- 

GO 


>, 
qj 
g JC 

3 4-» 

O 


^3 <D O •- 


3 
O 

*3 2 


_C 4-i 
- «n 

GO 

3 


a S 
o -S 
E 

Cd u 
w- 0) 
GO «o 


3 

^3 


-C -3 

See 
3 cd cd 


~3 

3 

O 

J 


O 

-c. 

"3 



M— 

o 

c 

3 

•- 

3 


X 

O 

-3 

O 

0 

>% 

«4m 

, 

V* 


0 

C/5 

V 


QJ 

UJ 

-J 

Cu 

CO 

6 

Q. 

2 

a 

UJ 

• 


r* 

UJ 


a 

C 

V 

z 

• 


X 

44 

Ofi 

I 



C 

J u 

z 

o 

• 

CJJ 

^3 

3 

-a 

c 

cd 

I 


6 

V 

H 


V. 

-o 

< 

• 

a 

a> 

OS 


co 

QJ 

2 

< 

<L> 

*« 

- 


3 

O 

4-4 

QJ 

c 

o 

X 


3 «tf 

o 5 

7 

*3 3 

a -3 

5 § 

- 8 

D 


Aspect «nn Tft — oaMMi: 3aBosa: AaptaetKa, rUtCTHHxa. Koirropbi: MocHtr naaomHHa. 


2106 


OJABPMHA 

rPAMM0$0HMT) mCTHHOKl 

METPOUOJIb PEKOPK'B. 

Ct. Anpi/ieBKa, 
MocK.-KleBo-BopoHawcKOfl *. a. 

Moll, Kybaeth & E°. 

OFFENE HANDELSGESELLSCHAFT. 
SCHALLPLATTENFABRIK. 
Bankofski pereulok, >6 2, Zimmer 35. 


ToprOBUH AOMTa 

Mojijitp, Kn 6 apTb h K 2 . 

KOHTOPA H CKJIAflV. 

MocKBa,, MucHHUKaH, BaHKOBCKlH nep., a. N* 2, kb. 35. 

Te/ie$oHi> 298-97. 


' MJ f /,9/f 




2107 



03 

& 05 


D u +-» 

>■ c 

-S 3 


oj (n >, 


<a 
c 


•£<■- 


-C a! 
tcj: 
3 *-• 


i- i'- O n 

p~.cc i- .5 

£ 


:X 


§•5 

O ai 


V.® 3 
ssO, E 

O c/3 


G o3 


C/2 Xj 
G c/3 

O 


G H 


o5 


Cw 

u 
cj 

o3 ^ 

C/5 

* o 
~ ^ G .G 
a) „ o > 

>> c/) ^ 

D 0) u C 

a) g s « 
r o • rt jz 
*£ /G to ~ 

u • ~ G 

C 

xj .£ 

O^sf 

J s ° 
>-) o<-a o 
^ § u 


-s o 

*G X) 

'-*-< c/3 

o C3 
c/3 £ 


£ u 
^ 03 
C/3 T3 
03 C 

*5 3 

G <D 

£ 

o 

o5 

o -»-. 

P> G 

S) £ 

(D CD 

X X 
-*-* 
03 

f~! ^3 

03 

G G 
a; G 
a) •- 

G g 

f 8 


0^0 rt 
S '5. -3 

as OJ 

>- c 

" . C/3 G 

.S P-S 
a> o 

S’ 6 


a; 

|s 

S ON 


CJ Cw . 

a 5 

g S s 

£ - § 
u g P* 
03 • - rt 

at ^ 

0) 


_ 3-1 i- 

.S 03 Gq: 


2 O 
2 

0) c 
T ct 


.!« g 

5 .£ & 

~ 05 

+•> G 

<D 
£ 
o 
u 

03 
G 

G -G (/j 
h£) G g 

G 03 G 

o5 -C _ 


I £ S 3 

° 8 .a 

G 


+j u. 


03 


3 

a m « 


C/3 

03 03 

-R x 


^ W r 

.So| 

§ 

as aS J 

e to 

_ a . 

c 043 


<u E 5 

-C -3 < 

■ MJ3 «U <u 

*S 3-S-e g 
« *o § £ (jo 

^ G - £ - 

»_ 03 ^ • 


03 
03 

X3 C 
C/3 ° 
o3 O 

^ o 

C/3 


0j 


o3 >, 


, cg 2 

< *r G2 

“ j: -C 

i— i O C/3 -*_i -*-* 

H 


? 'G 
3 G 
< o3 
3 - 
u 
3 03 
0-G 
3 U 

3 G 


I a; 
' > 

I 

i 03 
. X 


u G G 
G oJ £ . 

o ~ 35 

ugQ 

03 

O a3 b 


"G 

G 

„ ^3 O ^ 

^'a 

3- rt 03 u 

03 03 "G 

J G ^ 

03 


03 03 
c/3 _c r 
C/3 4-» ^ 
03 03 

(J i_*_, C/3 

^ ° cu 
^ W) rt 
In ■- E 

03 C 
-»-j 03 C/3 

oJ CD rt 
J °G 

he 03 S 

c^ JG ^ 
• G ^ aG 

^ u 


'O 

v G 
G _. 

£ o 


oJ 

■m 'he o 

c c ^ 

|t u 

•I 

a- J 3 
CLu- rf 
05 O Ph 


«* IS 

he ^ 
G ^ 
eg O 

C/3 


OJ 


03 

. X 


T3 * G 

G ^ 

rt >-4 
•— r, Cl3 

1 JS.S 

«122 






2108 


ju >, 
bO ^ 


rt 

-a « 

£ ►. 

'I | 

^ rt 


u. 

03 

O 

JO 



rt3 


03 

G 

> 

’ 

* 03 
U 

cn 

cn 

03 


Ui 

‘u 


u 

Ui 


03 

rt 

> 


03 

Ui 

G 

03 

> 

03 

o 

JO 


C/3 

-o 


03 

c 

Ed 


c a) 

•« J2 
» 4 -* 

G 4-. 

« rt 
3 

£ = 

G -2 
03 cj 
03 3 

.H J 

*cn - 
j>. 0 

c 3 

° 5 

cn 

rt > 

> 03 

•" G 
03 •- 
-G a; 

c/) 

44 

E3 r- ■ 

c .5 

a ^ 
_r s 
15 C§ 

-C T3 
E "rt 

" p 


in v a <s> o 

Cd SO c/3 s G 


O ^ 
-5 0) 

O u 

J g 

.5 -S 

•a 52 
<u 5$ 

Ui SO 
rt 

03 12 
p, G 
rv <D 

S' ^ 

Co 03 
„, u. 

H a 

^ ,n 

u. 

0) 

rt 


O .tJ 
~ G 

2 S ^ 

^ 'S 

G 


<D « 
0) 

£ _ 
« a 

JO 


SO aj 


-5 jz * 
° bb -* 

u c ^ 

s ■- 

^ ^3 — 1 u_ 

O S T3 ° 
4-* rt a) 

a 


a) 

34 

o 


— • ci- 
te c 

c s 

W .2 


o 

cn -£ 

£ - 

£ § 
o O 


32 TJ N 
to ^ rt 

■ffi ^ E 
~ . c rt 
£ -g « 

•13 " c 

"J rt • = 

p a j5 


U- QJ 

'42 

u. T3 

03 a) 


03 
cj 

c 

rt 

£ '” H 
Ul 4-i 

O rt 


£ 8. 
G O 
5! 3 

e » 

Cm 


- „ O 
32 
cj 


£ * 
5? | 

<D 

G 4- 

3 O 


4-1 

03 

M 

Q 

O 


rt 

CJ 

CJ 

*4—1 


G 

SO 

l_l 

• 

£ 

T3 

cn 

rt 

03 

CJ 

JO 

3 

33 

0 

Ui 

a 

1 

G 

03 

> 

4—* 

rt 

cn 

SO 

03 

Ed 

’cn 

G 

S 

03 

03 

G 

rt 


£ 

.2 

‘o 

cn 

<4-1 

.2 

44 

E 

U-. 

C 

rt 

G 

> 

o 

CJ 

03 


C 



03 

so 

E 

o 


e2 

*03 

cn 

CO 


4j n! 3 

« >, ° 

8 $ s 

g " - 

| Bo 

rt G ^ 

<D ° £ 

G D ^ 

'*"' £ 03 

^ c« -S 


a; 

a 

x 

a; 

G 

u 

03 

32 


aj 
03 

a 
0) 

tJD £ 
G S 

* "S 

03 

0) Ui 

S2 V 
tf) 32 
> 

G ^ 
O 


cn 


u 

<D 

0 
cc 

1 

aj 

<3 

a 

o 


<D aj 
<D 


V a) 

o •£ 

CJ 
C 1 3 


o .£ 


tUD 

G 

u 

3 

"3 

-a 

<D 

C 


T3 

G 

3 

£ 

u 

O 


_ 32 

tl O 

aJ 

D C/) 

32 <: 

4-* ^ 

G 

G 

13 ° 

2 C/3 

33 03 


aj — . 


-a . 

in aJ ™ 

°° y J 
< - 

Is - - 

° 32 

SP £ 

C 0J 
be 
£ 

C/3 X-» 




o 


^ •£ 
0) G 

^ < 


G 
0) 

£ * 

a) 

N T3 
rt a) 

£ £ a 
rt a) 

0) a) 

C 1,1 -fi 

CD CD 
re 32 <-»- 
ce c/3 o 


c/> ^ 
rt <2 

34 

O 
O 


<D 

-C 


CD <D -3 


G 

<D 


a 

CD 


c c 

3 2 

S M 
u -c 

a m 


.13 CTj 

£ £ 
CD 

C 

£ H 
C 

^ CD 
_ cn 

2 E 

T3 32 

E SS 

g <u 

2 J 2 
0 ) 1 -- 
u <u 
>> 
V V 

jz 51 

l/l *5 


c « 

g a 


rt si 
g 5 

JO V 
•- (3 

t: -a 

d 

a, s 

- aj 

S8 3 

.a Q 

u> 

CD 03 

£ -S 
< 2 


C 

o 


2 

o 

~aJ 

£ 

32 

32 

be 


o 

>> 

M 

o 

(/) 

JG 

T3 

03 

T3 

O 


03 

32 

H 


G 

03 

£ 

03 

’D 

x 

03 


T3 O 
aj 

E u-> 

oo 
_ oc 


aJ G 
tl O 
a 

d d 

° ,a 

03 
£ "cD 

V4-. U 
^ 03 

— . 32 

d *m 

a ^ 
rt 5S 

03 00 


II 

.£ c 

u aj 
4-* CJ 

03 U 
si 03 


c/T ^ 
03 {Jl 
CJ ”o3 

i £ 

o ■£ 

'-H +■* 

u 

03 ce 

a 03 

3-i 

22 O 
rt y 

.S G 

4—* 03 

rn 

03 u- 
O 

*"<D "<5 
T3 G 
G .ti 
G 


3 S 

rt rt 

o cq 


JS X 


JU 
03 *2 

•£ S 

*• 4-* 

G G 

03 •- 
T3 ^ 


03 

32 

G 

O 

c/. 

03 

U 


G 

2 

03 oe 
G 'G 

03 CD 

be GJ 

03 O 
32 G 
^ 34 


G 03 
03 SZ 
£ ~ 

03 T2 

Vm 03 

‘XI T3 

03 d 
J-* 03 

"3 12 

c rt 

«= 15 - 
2££ 


d ’ 

o 

a jj 

03 •£ 
> 

CJ 5 

15 ^ 

ce 

4— * 4— < 

G J- 
03 03 

e g 

o 

bo o 

d 

bo 33 

g rt 
* E 

OJ i . 

G t, 
G 03 
G £ 
rt 

32 


03 

Vm 

rt 

03 

32 

4-* 

G 

O 


si 

2T G 


G 

O 

£ 

£ 

o 

u 


J G 

03 0) 


o a 

5 s 

'a _3 

oo ^ 

^ o 

G ^ 

— ON 
nj C30 
03 ^ 


rt 

l ■§ 

8 rt 


O 32 ._ 


t rt 
^ g 

g .22 
o ~ 

> C/3 


G 

03 

03 

a 

C/3 

rt 

32 


rt 
PL, 

03 22 


< J£ 


ce 
2 

CD -5 


C/3 rt 

rt a 

O CJ 


rt J3 
G 3 

o rt 
. 4 
03 Ui 
O rt 

’o S 

> 03 


03 

32 


G 

.2 

4 j 

CJ 

G 

T3 

O 


■3 .3 ^ 

rt ^ rt 
^ 03 

>, a : 

B H 'Z 

03 4_i 

a aj 

£ 03 W 

“ G 


C 

o 


o 

O 

03 

G 

O 


a 

cd bo 
u G 
'o 

S c 

rt rt 

> 32 

> CJ 
O 


a 

O 
O o> 


rt 


2 w 
a-g 5 

g ^ £ 
2^2 
C « 

t £ <« 

^ ft S 

C/3 Ui 

o CD G 

~ g 9 

•2 - .rt 

o 

U 
U 
rt 


be >> 

G i- 
G 3 

5) -g 

- 03 

CD ° 
rt 

Ph ^ 
rt 

03 rt 
32 

* M G 
rt 

O 32 

U 4-» 

- O 

•g £ 

2 03 


T2 

G 

rt 


aj 

a 

E 


T3 

03 

C/3 

G 


rt 

PL, 


G 
> 

G O 


a* o 

s ^ 


03 d 

£ a 

- C/3 


03 C/3 -rt 

rt u rt 

33 03 

> C/3 

° o ^ 

a ° -3 

g " o 

m >, a 

v 3 

J3 


c 

s « 

O C/3 

? I 

03 *rt 
03 

£ g 

^ 8 


03 :0 
32 h 


S " - C/3 

n u 
2 « 
T3 T3 

« ,3 

^ oo CJ 
^ 00 ^ 

^ o 

.5 & 


w CD 

c -S 

^ -5 


„ C/3 


^ O 


rt 

Ui 

O 

P-c 


aj 

£ 

bo 

c 

3 

rt 


C/3 


G 

.2 

'u ^ 
rt 

u G ■ 
bo 03 
. d3 


O u 

C/3 0) 

G 32 

rt ^ 

CJ *T3 


rt 


T3 

C 

rt 

cn 

8 03 

G 


«, rt 
rt 32 

CJ .12 
2 £ 



03 

> 

rt 

32 


Ed 

03 

.£ 

'jrt 

1 j 

x 

03 

03 

CJ 

C 

O 


rt 

Oh 


£ 


^ O — 

be ° g 
c o S 
JS C jS 


o > - 1 

cfl T3 


la o 

“ 'C J3 

a T3 C/3 

^ rt - 
__< a Q3 

Ti ^ 3 

c c <3 


£ ^ 

2 -c 

*. o 

W ■•£ 

! | 

.2 ° 

’ C/3 l_, 

G 03 

g ^ 

m-, c 

^ ° 

>, .t: 

Ui 

O 03 

03 > 

32 rt 
+■* 32 

^ £ 


■s 2 c 


G 

Ui rt 

cn 

aj 

03 

C/J 

cn 

Ui 

O rn 

rs 

0) 

03 

33 .£ 
^ G 

OJ Ui 
* ^ 

' c 

Ed 

rt 

cn 

"3 

4-1 

> 

*03 

cn 

3 

T3 

s 

rt 

Ph 

E 

03 

03 

4-» 

CJ 

UH 

3 

rt 

so 

G 

4-. C 

o 

4-* 

Ui 

rt £ 
r~! 03 

r . 33 

l£ 

g 

03 

Ed 

03 

4-* 

cn 

G 


G 

33 


03 

3 

CJ 





2109 




«= bC'S 

u c rt 

<u -p - 

<- G fQ 

«•&§ 
rt s J .5 

o ~ ° 


. M 

is g. 

O « rt 

_g E 

O' ai " 
*-• ~ U ■ 

y c 

SC C '7 


H-ja c .S » c 


-a o 


i O '** « * 

3 O j* jp. , 

* 2 w o wj 

* r V- ° •- 

> o ^ 

: " 6 aZ 

. .jg U »- 
i — — X P . 
^ rt " 

« S •o ~ 
a; .2 y ^ 

‘ o 


^ — -*-> 
— 

be 3 o 
c t f . 


y p 3 
c 

u c/J 
c (U (U 

O ^ r 
o ‘Z "5 


T3 

Vh 

cd 

J-l 

a> 

u 


.B 4 3 >, 
OJ o.~ 
i: 


- iS 


a o 
5 C g 
J K x £ rt 


tv. 


C 

T 3 ^ O 

S'"-! 

_ w d) 

2 t-c ./ 2 


T 3 r- _ . <D y 

e-t* • ^ ^ ~ n __ 


rt ^ p 


<u x 
D. a> 
B* c 
X rt 


2 2 S- 

c 

w ° ' 

X — »rr *-* *" cn 


- > — .2 


r c 

rt 


i C ^ 

n O u 

re > c 
„ c o 
.2 re 23 

M = o 

•E5E 


< a> " 
/'.'Ho 




<u 


.2 5 UJ 


c > « 


T3 £“ £• 

<D 0 J 2 

” c a 


a rt 

O JZ 


5 o .: 

j ^ i 

» g*-s s 

i . - rt ‘P 

4 a» E T 
; .3 y 5 u 

: v o 2 9 
; X > -a 2 


dO- 

E 2 S° 
o 6 -S’" 

O o 

3 S ^2= 
Si-clx 
2 "-S 2 

- 2 3 rt 


9 

I 

3 

9 

i 

i 

9 


M 


<U 0) t/5 
r r B 


J23 E 

ai nJ 

!l 

O c/J 

3 

o 8 


« a w 

is £>5 

t /5 .. re 

„SQ” 

_E 'St . *■> 

w is 
c"g /Sffl 


<U U 3 J 5 
C « n 

rt r y ^ 


re ca 
r > 
__ o W 
' uj: S^tn 

p — E 2 
a) 5/5 •£ ■= ‘*5 


c rt — Jn 


C tn ■ 
rt <u 

E C/) 

</! " 


ffl 


as ^ 


^ n — 

c ^ w .t; 


c 

cS 

> 

W 


*TD 

w 


c o 
}r a. 


8 &t 8 8 

■73 re 
. u 
C « 


.2 "-a 
S a; 
^ C T3 
7= = 


.sA§* 

r SfflX 

“ « o « 


x: o 


re 
o 

E 
re 

E 

CLJ 3 

O 

Vi O 
bc^ 


re > 


o c . 


E ‘-5 


C/) 


C 

m2 


Ol 


re , 
<u 


" a) re 

2 S3 8 s 

/-pH C— — ✓ ^ L. 

? -2.il 


- 1> ii 

i-s S.s 

•o c_ ? 

. o o 

*2 £ U 

re gj 

>3*2 
h-. T 3 re 

O O ’ 


(/) u 

^ o 

JJ 


0 ) 

: ^ 6 re 

•*- re y 
<u o s: T - 
*5 v & £j 

, S ! : J 

^ si a 
r.?s 

re c .7 0 / 
tc 4 ) ^ E 
c 73 O 
d) u 

re o v: 

eC w 'p 

« •- p 

" P re re 
E r. JZ 


z <-> 

■n C 
C 


E W u ^ 3 - 




Battistini 


Wilhelm Backhaus 


Boninsegna 


Clara Butt 


Calve 



2111 


MAUDE PERCEVAL ALLEN 
is a native of Ripley, in Derbyshire, and became a 
professional singer in opposition t» her parents' wishes. 
Her singing master was Mr. William Shakespeare, in whose 
Brahms Quartet perty she made some of her earliest 
appearances. During her carerr of a dozen years, Miss 
Perceval Allen's charming personality and presence have 
aided her impressive and bell-like soprano voice in 
bringing her steadily, step by step, to the front rank, 
from the early days of routine work at Ballad Concerts 
and with provincial choral societies to her recent 
triumphs on the operatic stage. She has done excellent 
work at festivals, including the Handel Festival, and 
those at Norwich and Leeds. In 1906 she sang in the 
first London performance of Richard Strauss's "Taillefer" 
at Queen's Hall. Her ipe ratio Debut took place in Feb- 
ruary, 1908, at Covent Garden, as Brunnhilde in "Gotter- 
dammerung" to the Siegfried of Peter Cornelius; and 
splendid records of their performance in the great duet 
work of the first act may be found in the Gramophone Co. 
library. A South African tour followed in the same year. 
One of her most recent successes has been as Brangane in 
"Tristan", a part not usually associated with a soprano. 
She has also studied the role of Elektra and communicated 
the results to the Gramophone recorder with brilliant 
effect. 

MARIO ANCONA 

one of the most distinguished of Italian baritones, came 
to England first in 1892, when his debut was one of the 
few redeeming features in Lago's unfortunate season at 
the Olympic Theatre. His first appearance was in 
Donizetti's "La Favorita", and he made a particularly 
good good impression as Telramund in "Lohengrin". 

Engaged the following season at Covent Garden, he sang 
as Tonio in the first English performance of "Pagliacci", 
giving a very fine rendering of the already famous 
Prologues, which he has since rehearsed to the Gramophone. 
Later on in the season he took part in the premieres of 
Mascagni's "I Rantzau" and Stanford's "Veiled Prophet"; 
and he was one of the artistes whoo went to Windsor on 
15th. July to perform "Cavalleria Rusticana" and the 
second act of "L'Amico Fritz" before Queen Victoria". 

His last Gran Opera season here was in 1899 when he 
created ( the part of Marcello in the original version of 
"La Boheme". In the autumn of 1904 he came over with the 
San Carlo Company to Covent Garden, and during the follow 
ing summer he sang in Henry Russell's season at the 
Waldorf Theatre. Since then, so far as England is con- 
cerned, he has rested on his well-earned laurels. 

WILHELM BACKHAUS 

was bom in Leipzig on 26th. March, 1884, the fifty- 
seventh anniversary of Beethoven's death. Whe four years 
old he began to pick out tunes on a toy piano, and at the 
age of ten he began his serious training under Alois 
Reckendarf at the Leipzig Conservatory. A characteristic 
passion for thoroughnes helped his progress from the 
first, and the fame which he very soon gained as an 
infant prodigy was fortunately a mere incident which 
was not allowed to interfere in any way with his artistic 
development. On leaving the Conservatory he took some 
finishing lessons from Eigen d'Albert at Frankfort-on- 
Main, and in 1900 he made his debut as an adult pianist. 
At that time, we are told, he had already mastered and 
memorised some three hundred compositions, including a 
dozen concertos. In the following year he came to Lon- 
don and gave his first recital, with the assistance of 
Miss Elsie Southgate, at.St.James's Hall, on 26th. June, 
the programme including Brahms, Paganini Cariations and 
the Kreutzer Sonata. In 1902 he made an accidental 
appearance at the Manchester Halil Concerts, taking 
Siloti's place at two days' notice in a performance of 
Beethoven's Fourth Concerto. Three years later he 
returned to Manchester to take up the appointment which 


he still holds as principal professor of the pianoforte at 
the Royal College of Music. Meanwhile he had been firmly 
establishing his reputation in England and on the"Contin- 
ent" . At one concert in Berlin, where he played the piano 
part in Richard Strauss' "Burleske" under the composer's 
baton, he was the embarrassed recipient of twenty-two 
recalls, and the audience finally had to be turned out of 
the hall. 

At the Salle Erard, Paris, on 8th .August, 1905, Mr. Back 
haus took part in the Rubinstein Competition for piano 
playing, and in spite of his youth obtained the first prize 
among twenty— six competitors. The test— pieces on that 
occasion ranged from Beethoven' s terrible Hammerclavier 
Sonata at one end of the world of music to Liszt's trans- 
cription of Paganini's "La Campanella" (which is among Mr. 
Backhaus' Gramophone records) at the other. 

By temperament and intellectual equipment Mr .Backhaus 
rightly belongs to the classical school of pianists. His 
playing may be characterised in the phrase which Herbert 
Pocket applied to Mr. Wopsle's conception of the part of 
Hamlet, as "massive and concrete". In the words of a pic- 
turesque critic, "he always gives the impression of having 
drawn his inspiration from a land of giants." He makes no 
attempt to dazzle his hearers with gymnastic dexterities 
or exaggerated perversions of the composer's meaning, but 
relies for his efforts on a broad solid style, a clear 
precise rhythm, a pure sonorous tone, and a manly, straight 
forward interpretation. His list of records is a most 
interesting one, inlcuding a Bach Prelude and Fugue, a 
portion of the Grieg Concerto, a group of Chopin studies, 
and Weber's "Perpetuum Mobile". 

Mr. Backhaus has done good service to the cause of English 
music by instituting an annual prize for the h st piano- 
forte composition. 

MATTHIA BATTISTINI 
baritone, of whose voice his fellow countrymen are so 
enamoured that they have given him the proud title of "La 
Gloria d'ltalia", was bom in 1857» and “ade his debut in 
1878 at the Teatro Argentino, Rome, in Donizetti's "La 
Favorita". Hus success on that occasion secured him an 
immediate engagement for the Italian Opera at Buenos Ayres. 
Subsequent years established his reputation on the princi 
pal operatic stages of Italy, Spain, Portugal and South 
America; and his fame was at its heights and his powers in 
their full maturity when he paid his first visit to Eng- 
land. This was in 1887, that memorable year in which the 
late Sir Augustus Harris turned from his triumphs in panto- 
mime and spectacular drama, and made a brilliantly and 
sccessful effort to rescue Italian opera from the moribund 
state into which it had fallen in this country. It was 
the year of the great dlbuts - of Jean de Reszke as a 
tenor, of Sigrid Amoldson, of Fernando de Lucia, of Marie 
Engle, and, last but not least, of our subject. His first 
appearance was made as Rigoletto, the part which, more than 
any other in his repertory, may be regarded as peculiarly 
his own. His acting in it is more than sufficient, and he 
makes light of the exacting music, thanks to the excellence 
of his uppir register, which climbs beyong the high G - 
summit of most baritones' ambitions - to a topmost B flat. 
In paryicular, his singing of "Pari siamo" has never been 
surpassed. 

After the Covent Garden season of 1893, Signor Battistini 
went to Russia, where a twelve years' consecutive engage- 
ment deprived London of the pleasure of hearing him sing 
again until the autumn of 1905, when he appeared in the 
parts of Valentino, Rigoletto, and Don Giovanni. As 
Mozart's cynical hero he is at his best. His clarity of 
enunciation enables him to take "Fin ch'han dal vino", at 
lightning speed, and his gaiety is inimitable in "La ci 
darem", which he has recorded, with Signora Corsi for the 
Gramophone Library. 



2112 

Signor Battistini was here again for the Grand Opera 
season of 1 906 when he sang the part of Eugene Onegin at 
the first production of Tchaikovsky's opera. (It had been 
heard here before, in English, during Lago's unfortunate 
Olympic season of 1892). Since then we have had to 
regret his absence annually. During the summer of this 
year he has been singing in an Italian Opera season at 
Vienna, achieving the greatest individual success of all 
the artistes engaged, and giving his audiences welcome 
evidence that the art of bel canto has not yet succumbed 
to the tender mercies of Teutonic declaimers. 

Battistini' s repertory includes the part of Werther - 
originally written for a tenor, but specially 'bariton- 
ised' for him by Massenet himself. He also sings in such 
seldom-heard operas as 'La Favorita' , 'Don Sebastian' and 
•Marta' . Those who wish to revive their acquaintance 
with these, and with the concerted numbers and the 
famous "0 dei Verd' Anni Miei" of "Eemani" may consult 
his Gramophone records with advantage. 

CELESTINA BONINSEGNA 

was bom in 1877 at Reggio Emilia, where her parents were 
in very modest circumstances. Talent overcame lack of 
opportunity, and at the age of fifteen, without any musi- 
cal knowledge or training, she appeared locally as Norina 
in "Don Pasquale" , and obtained such a success that she 
managed to persuade her parents to send her to the Pesaro 
Conservatory, then, as now, under the direction of 
Mascagni. After studying there for five years with 
Virginia Boccabadati, she made her dibut at Piacenza in 
"Lohengrin" and "The Queen of Sheba", thereupon securing 
an immediate at the Dal Verme, Milan. Two years later, in 
1901, Mascagni chose her to create the part of Rosaura at 
the first production, in Rome, of his opera "Le Maschere". 
From Rome she went to the Municipal Theatre at Santiago, 
Chile, and she has since appeared in Madrid, Lisbon, New 
York, and most of the opera houses of Northern Italy. 

Signorina Boninsegna has visited London twice with the 
San Carlo Company, in the autumn of 1904, when she made a 
specially favourable impression as Amelia in "Un Ballo in 
Maschera" again in 1 905. In her native land she is 
regarded as one of the greatest of living dramatic 
sopranos . 

CLARA BUTT 

of all living English singers the one who makes the 
widest appeal to the largest public, was bom at South- 
wick, Sussex, in 1873. Her parents soon afterwards 
removed to Bristol, where she grew up amid congenially 
musical surroundings, but without any suspicion being 
aroused of her wonderful birthright, until she had attain 
ed the age of fourteen, when a visitor's chance remark 
set her mother thinking. The result was a curate of 
lessons with Mr. Daniel Rootham. In 1889 she gained a 
scholarship at the Royal College of Music, where she 
studied under Mr. J, H. Blower. While still a student 
she made some informal appearances at the pupils' 
concerts, in a Palestrina Mass with the Bach Choir and 
elsewhere. Her regular debut was made at the Albert Hall 
on December 7th. 1892, at Ursula in "The Golden Legend" 
and three days later she took the title-role at a pupils' 
performance of "Orfeo" at the Lyceum. Her commanding 
presence and the extraordinary beauty of her voice made 
a memorable impression, and concert engagemants began to 
flow in at once. In October, 1893* she made her first 
festival appearances at Hanley and Bristol; and it may be 
noted here that she has declared her special fondness for 
this branch of her work, especially when it entails sing- 
ing in cathedrals. 

In 1895 her public career was interrupted by a renewed 
course of study in Paris, under M. Bouhy and Mme. Etelka 
Gerster. She returned with all her powers, vocal and 


and artistic, fully developed, to take at once her unique place 
among great singers. In 1900 came her marriage with Mr. 
Kennerley Rumford, preceded by a joint concert tour which was 
turned by the interest of the public in the approaching event 
into something like a royal progress. Since then they have 
made who knows how many progresses together, through England 
and every English-speaking land. 

There is only one Clara Butt. A critic once compared her to 
Alboni in her prime, noting how the voices resembled in 
quality, range, flexibility and power, but admitting the super 
excellence of the modem singer in impressive grandeur. In 
one respect -her wide sway over the musical affections of so 
called "unmusical people - she might be likened to Antoinette 
Stirling. For them, and for all who have ears to hear great 
singing, she lavishes her overwhelming resources of voice and 
emotion on the vergreen sentiment of "The Lost Chord", "The 
Promise of Life", on the noble depths of "•mbra Mai Fu", on 
the virile patriotism of "Land of Hope and Glory", on the 
cynical gaiety of Donizetti's "II Segreto". Her own favour* 
ites, we are allowed to know, are "0 Rest in the Lord" and 
Liddle's "Abide with me". 

It is interesting to learn that the Gramophone Company's 
experts have devoted special attention to the historic task of 
adequately recording Clara Butt's voice. Experiments to that 
end have resulted in the construction of a special device 
that brings her latest records, which include the above 
mentioned, a step nearer to perfection than has hitherto been 
achieved. 

EMMA CALVE 

The greatest of Carmens was bom at Madrid^ studied under 
Marchesi and Puget, and made her debut in grand opera in 1882 
at Brussels, as Marguerite. In 1884 came her first engage- 
ment in Paris, where she created the part of the hemoine in 
Dubois* "Aben Hamet", Returning in 1889, after successful 
tours in Italy, she sang in Bizet's "Pecheurs de Perles" at 
Th&atre Italian; and in January, 1892, she created the part of 
Santuzza at the Parisian premiere of "Cavalleria Rusticana". 
Three months later London heard her and Mascagni's opera 
together for the first time. She also sang in the first Eng- 
lish performance of "l'Amico Fritz", and created Amy Robsart 
in de Lara's opera. Her name is furthermore associated with 
the initial hearing of two Massenet's operas - "La Navaraise" 
in London (1894), and "Sapho" in Paris (1897) • But it is with 
Carmen above all that Emma Calvl's name will be inseparably 
associated. The seemingly reckless audacity of her realism in 
this part is controlled and guided by the powers of selection 
and creation that belong only to the great artist, and 
reinforced by an exquisitely sweet, perfectly trained voice; 
and the result is unforgettable. At her concerts Madame Calv4 
has made a speciality of the folk-songs of all nations, and 
she is as ready to bring her consummate art to bear on "The 
Old Folks at Home" as on the "Habanera", both of which are 
among her Gramophone records. 

ENRICO CARUSO 

If the happiest of dispositions, dazzling success achieved at 
the commencement almost without effort, a princely income, and 
the adoration of thousands in two hemispheres, constitutes the 
summit of good fortune, then surely Enrico Caruso is the most 
fortunate man alive. His good luck may be said to have begun 
at birth; for who would not be born a Neapolitan if he could? 
"My father was an engineer," he relates in one of those 
innumerable interviews which he good-naturedly grants to all 
and sundry, "and he wanted me to follow his profession. But 
music came naturally to me, and although I first went to a 
school of engineering, I could not help singing. Then came 
my period of service in the artillery, where my major took a 
great interest in my singing. One day a teacher named Signor 
Vergino heard me sing and said I ought to drop engineering. So 
I began"- began learning roles straight away with hardly any 
prelimary training possessing as he did , one of those rarest 


among the crowd 


2113 


of voices that are properly "placed" by nature from top to 
bottom. This was in 1895, and his first appearance, in 
"Andrea Chenier", roused such enthusiasm among his audience 
that all the impressarii in Italy were on his track at once. 

A season at Monte Carlo introduced him to a cosmopolitan 
audience, and resulted in invitations to sing in Buenos Ayres 
New York, Berlin, Paris, Barcelona and other cities. His 
first London engagement followed in 1902, his second in 1904, 
and since then a Covent Garden season without Caruso has been 
of the rarest occurrence. 

In the early days his voice was lighter than it is now; in 
fact, when his great predecessor Tamagno heard him, he called 
him a 'tenorino' , and advised him to confine himself to such 
light roles as Wilhelm in "Mignon". But the voice soon began 
to develop and strengthen, until it became equal to the most 
exacting perts in the repertory of the tenore lirico. And 
what a voice it isi Out of its strength comes forth sweet- 
ness incomparable. In declamatory passages it rings like a 
clarion, while in mezza voce work its smooth pellucid beauty 
gives even more delight to those who know. His perfect con- 
trol over it is evinced alike in his fortissimo, never forced 
his pianissimo, always full of tone, and, above all, in that 
wonderful diminendo on a sustained note that gradually dies 
away to the edge of silence. 

"I have no favourite parts", he declared on one occasion. "An 
artiste must not have any favourites - he must be ready to 
sing all." After this definite pronouncement a selection of 
roles would be invidious, and a complete list would pretty 
well cover the range of lyric opera from "Don Giovanni" to 
"Fedora". Fortunately for future generations, Signor Caruso 
has contributed a wide range of records to the Gramophone 
library, and our remote descendants will be able to hear 
"Celeste Alda", "Vesti la Giubba" and "Che gelida manina," 
sung as no one else in our time has sung them. 

JOHN COATES 

Bom at Girlington, near Bradford, our leading English tenor 
began his musical career as a choir boy at the early age • 
of five. At thirteen he was earning his living in an office. 
All his spare time was devoted to the study of music and 
languages; and in 1893, when he had already gained a local 
reputation at concerts and in opera, he threw up his position 
and came to London, where after a few lessons from Mr. Shakes 
peare, he made his dlbut in "Utopia Limited". Five years 
followed of comic oerpa in England and America, till in 1900 
came his great success as Perkin Warbeck in "The Gay Pretend- 
ers." In 1901 his long series of festival engagements began 
at Leeds; he appeared at Covent Garden in various parts, 
including that of the hero at the first performance of 
Stanford's "Much ado about nothing"; and a visit to Cologne 
resulted in an immediate engagement to sing at the Grand 
Opera there. Both on the platform and the stage Mr. Coates 
is as well known in Germany as in England. Few singers can 
boast of so complete as equipment, vocal, intellectual and 
temperamental; he can act as well as sing, and is a fluent 
liguist to boot. His Gramophone record of Lohengrin's 
"Narration" is in English, but he us equally ready to sing it 
in French, Italian or German. 

HARRY DEARTH 

Mr. Harry Dearth is a Londoner bom, bred and trained. The 
idea of music as a profession did not fix itself in his mind 
until he was eighteen, when he competed for a scholarship at 
the Royal College of Music, and gained it in spite of a lack 
f previous training. His studies were continued from 1885 
to 1898 when he was made an Associate. In the same year he 
obtained a post as lay vicar-choral at Westminster Abbey, and 
made his first important public appearance at the first 
London performance of Stanford's "Stabat Mater" by the Royal 
rioral Society at the Albert Hall. Other concert and 
oratorio engagements were quickly made with the same Society, 
ani at the Queen's Hall and elsewhere in London; for bass 
moces of such fine quality and wide range as Mr. Dearth's 
are not so common as to run any danger of being overlooked 


Mr. Dearth has recently resigned his appointment at the Abbey 
with a view to an operatic career. He has already made a 
successful start under Mr. Beecham's auspices, notably in an 
excellent performance of the good-humoused father in "Hansel 
and Gretel", a part which exactly suits the genial troller of 
"Ho, Jolly Jenkin" and "A Sergeant of the Line". 

EMMY DESTINN 

Emmy Destinn, of the Royal Opera,Berlinp.s a native of Prague 
in Bohemia. The violin was her first study, but in 1892 she 
decided to adopt he present profession, and chose as her 
teacher the Italian Maria Loewe-Destinn. The identity of 
names, by the way, is a mere coincidence. After six years* 
study she made her djbut, in 1898, at the Berlin Opera, in 
the part of Santuzza, and three years later she had the well 
deserved honour of being included in the Bayreuth Festival 
cast, her chosen role being that of Senta in "The Flying 
Dutchman". The famous "Ballad" in this, her own favourite, 
part, is among the records that Fraulein Destinn has made for 
the Gramophone library. She sang it again when, in 1904, she 
gave London its first taste of her wonderful powers of sing- 
ing and acting. Her amazing versatility enabled her to score 
an equal success during the same seasom in the widely differ- 
ent role of Nedda in "Pagliacci". In I 906 she was here again 
and gave a notable performance of Donna Anna, besides 
creating the part of Tatiana at the first London performance 
of Tchaikovsky's /Eugene Onegin". In December of the same 
year she sang in the title role at the first Berlin perfor- 
mance of "Salome" , and shared with the composer the honours 
of the evening. An appearance at the Paris premiere of the 
same opera followed next year, and at the subsequent Covent 
Garden season she electrified the house by her rendering if 
what has since become her most famous part - Madame Butterfly 
This was at the first English performance of Puccini's opera. 
Another notable first appearance of that season was as the 
heroine as the heroine of Pochielli's "La Giocenda" . #f this 
a critic wrote: "To see Destinn as La Gioconda is to see a 
supreme piece of art. Her singing prior to the close of the 
last act, in which Gioconda commits suicide, was electrical; 
the horror and suddenness of the climax was overwhelming, and 
considered as a piece of realism it is wonderful." 

Fraulein Destinn' s repertory is extraordinarily large and 
varied. It includes Alda, which she sang at her rentree 
during the recent Covent Garden season, and in which her 
rendering of the famous "0 Fatherland" calls for special men- 
tion; both Venus and Elizabeth in "TannhSuser" ; Valentine in 
"The Huguenots" - a part in which she was lately associated 
at a 'star* performance with Tetrazzini and Zerola; Elsa in 
"Lohengrin", Carmen, Santuzza and Mignon. As an actress she 
has been compared by admirers to Eleanor Duse, and there is 
at least this resemblance; nothing in her performances is 
ever left to the chance inspiration of the moment; every 
gesture, every intonation is under rigid control of a fine 
and active intelligence. To every part she gives a new indi- 
viduality, and lends unsparingly all the resources of her 
glorious voice. Small wonder that in the eyes of many she 
has no living rival in the operatic field. 

Fraulein Destinn is also a poetess, and has published a 
volume of verse titled ?Sturm und Ruhe" . 

MISCHA ELMAN 

Mischa Elman was bom in 1892, in Stalnoje, a village in the 
province of Kiev, Southern Russia. When little more than a 
baby he came into the possession of a quarter-size fiddle, 
and began learning by ear the popular pieces and tunes which 
his father, who was the village schoolmaster, played over to 
him; and at the age of five, he made his first appearance at 
a village concert. In the face of great difficulties, his 
father succeeded in obtaining his admission to the Imperial 
School of Music at Odessa, where he was placed under Profess- 
or Fidelmann. The child's rapid progress soon attracted 
special attention. Sarasate, Brodsky and Professor Auer 


2114 


heard him and gave him praise and encouragement; and in 
November, 1902, when he had a second opportunity of playing 
before Auer, that eminent teacher bade him come to Saint 
Petersburg as his pupil. There in the most favourable 
surroundings, his genius developed with wonderful rapidity, 
and various public performances spread his fame as a boy 
prodigy. Invitations soon came to play in Paris, Prague and 
Cologne, and on 21st. March, 1905, he made his London dlbut 
at one of Mr. Charles Williams' orchestral concerts, when he 
played the Tchaikovsky Concerto and Beethoven's Romance in 
G. This writer can recall the extraordinary sensation occas- 
ioned by the sturdy little boy in the sailor suit when, after 
coming on the platform, grave and self-possessed, and making 
his stiff little bow, he attacked the opening phrases of the 
Russian composer's rather uninteresting work. His head, as 
he stood, was on a level with that of the seated leader of 
the orchestra; his playing in every respect, in tone, tech- 
nique, artistic feeling, and most amazing of all, in intel- 
lectual grasp, was that of a full-grown man. We had all 
heard other prodigies play what they had been taught, and 
play it wonderfully enough; but here was one who had 
evidently felt and thought out every bar for himself, 
emotion, fiery and tender by turns, was there, and behind it 
all a busy watchful brain. The audience was captured at once 
the critics did their duty next day, and succeeding appearan- 
ces confirmed and strengthened the first impression. 

In October he returned to introduce a new concerto by 
Glazunov before starting on a provincial tour. In 1906 he 
gave a series of recitals at Cueen's Hall, at one of them 
playing the Bach Double Concerto with his master, Professor 
Auer. That year saw the last of Master Elman, the juvenile 
prodigy; in the following we welcomed Mr. Elman, the mature 
artist of fifteen. Succeeding visits have given evidence of 
earnest and steady progress towards the highest summits of 
his art. Mere virtuosity has never tempted him aside, but he 
has all the vituoso's equipment at his command, and he is as 
ready to trifle elegantly with Sain-SeSns' Rondo Capriccioso 
and other light pieces which he has recorded for the Gramo- 
phone, as to address himself in the proper spirit to the most 
serious thing the violin has to say - the Brahms Concerto. 

GERALDINE FARRAR 

This brilliant young soprano, of great achievement and 
greater promise, was bom in 1882 at Melrose, Massachusets, 
and made up her mind to be a prima donna almost as soon as 
she had a mind to make up. When as in her case, high ambit- 
ion is associated with great natural gifts and indomitable 
perseverance, the result can never be in doubt. When she was 
fifteen, Mis Farrar was heard and encouraged by Jean de 
Reszke, Melba, and other great singers; and two years later 
she came over to study in Paris. Within six months an engage 
ment was offered her at the Royal Opera, Berlin, wher she 
made her debut, at the age of nineteen, as Marguerite in " 
"Faust". While at Berlin she continued her studies under 
Lili Lehmann, sang in"Pagliacci" , 11 Rom I o et Juliette", "Manon" 
and other operas, and incidentally found herself surrounded 
with the halo of a royal romance. In 1906 she went to sing 
in America for one season, returning to Berlin in 1 907. Miss 
Farrar has also sung in Paris, Munich, Stockholm and Monte 
Carlo, and her promised advent in London next Summer is 
eagerly awaited. Meanwhile, a froetaste of her brilliance 
in the roles of Marguerite, Manon and Cio-Cio-San may be 
enjoyed on the Gramophone. 

MARIA GALVANY 

Bom in 1878 at Granada, Spain, Maria Galvany received her 
training at Madrid Conservatory at the hands of Napoleone 
Verger, and made her operatic dlbut in I 897 at Cartagena in 
"Lucia di Lammermoor". Successful engagements at Valencia 
and Barcelone le up to an appearance in Madrid, where she 
made a complete conquest of the most fastidioius public in 
Spain. In 1901 she visited Italy, where she sang in Milan 
and other towns: and in the same year she made her first 


Russian appearance at Odessa. In 1 902 came the usual South 
American engagement, originally for twenty, ultimately for 
fifty performances. On her return to Europe, she sang, says 
our copious authority, "at Nice, Parma, Kiev, Odessa, Baku, 
Lisbon, Genoa, Modena, Trient, Novarra, Bucharest, Tiflis, 
etc." The range of the modem prima donna's dominion 
wide indeed, from the refined and flowery Riviera to the 
crude and oily Caucasus. 

Madame Galvany came to London last summer with the Castellano 
Company and made a very favourable impression in the part of 
Dinorah. Her voice is a light soprano, pure in tone and 
remarkable flexible. It can be heard to the very best 
advantage in such butterfly music as the Romeo and Juliet 
Waltz, which is among her records. 

HARRY PLUNKET GREENE 
The son of Richard Greene and the Hon. Louisa Plunket , Harry 
Plunket Greene was bom at Wicklow in 1 865 . Educated at 
Clifton College, he began his musical studies at Stuttgart 
in 1883, and continued them in Florence and London. His 
first public appearance was at a performance of "The Messiah" 
at the People's Palace, in January, 1888, and he soon became 
a familiar figure at London concerts. In 1890 he made some 
appearances at Covent Garden in such parts as the Duke in 
Romeo et Juliette", and the Commendatore in "Don Giovanni"; 
but Mr. Greene's chief laurels have been won in fields other 
than that of opera. At the Gloucester Festival of 1892 he 
sang the name-part in the oratorio "Job", specially written 
for him by Sir Hubert Parry, whose son-in-law he became eight 
years later; and in 1893 began a happy and long-continued 
association in recital-work with Mr. Leonard Borwick. He has 
toured successfully in Germany and America, 

The beauty of Mr. Plunket Greene's sonorous bass voice, and 
his thoughtfulness of interpretation, never fail of their 
effect, whether in oratorio, in the most intimate lieder of 
Schumann and Brahms, or in those dlightful arrangements of 
Irish melodies by Stanford and Somervell which he has made 
peculiarly his own, and of which he has made characteristic 
records . 

MARIE HALL 

Marie Pauline Hall was bom at Newcastle-on-Tyne on 8th. 
April, 1884, and received her first violin lessons from her 
father, who was a harpist in the Carl Rosa Orchestra. At the 
age of ten she had a year's tuition from Sir Edward Elgar, 
and she subsequently studied for three years with Max Mossel 
at Birmingham, making several appearances meanwhile as an 
infant prodigy. There was a hard struggle at this time to 
make both ends meet, and when, in 1899» she gained one of 
the recently instituted Wesseley Exhibitions at the Royal 
Academy of Music, she was unable through lack of means to 
take it up. The story runs that a little later a clergyman 
- an enthusiatic lover of music, found her in a half-starved 
condition playing for copper in the streets of Bristol. 
Recognising a talent beyond the ordinary, he took her to 
London, and with the assistance of some friends - among them 
the late Mr, Hill of Bond Street, placed her in a position 
to continue her studies with Professor Johann Kruse, After 
she had made steady progress with him for a year and more, 
her friends again came forward, and sent her, armed with a 
letter of introduction from Kubelik, to Professor Sevcik at 
Prague. The rule at the Prague Conservatory is that every 
pupil who enters must take the entire six years' course 
before leaving; but Anton Dvorak, at that time chief director 
of studies, was so impressed with her playing that for the 
first and last time he allowed the regulation to be broken, 
and the first five years to be taken as fiddled. Hard work 
is the first demand that Sevcik makes on his pupils, and it 
was a demand which Marie Hall was fully prepared to meet. 
During her year at the Conservatory and her extra five months 
of private study with him, she practised eight hours a day 
at least, and oftener ten. 



Miss Hall made her dlbut at Vienna in 1902, being then 
eighteen years old. She had previously scored a great 
success at students' concerts, when she was recalled twenty- 
five times after playing one of Ernst's concertos. When she 
appeared in London soon afterwards, the critics and the 
public at once put her in her proper place as the first of 
living English violinists. Since then, with one interrrupt- 
ion from a dangerous illness, her brilliant career has pro- 
ceeded on the usual lines, with the usual provincial, 
European, American, Australian and South African tours. 

Apart from the consummate technique which one expects from 
her master's pupil, Marie Hall's playing is chracterised by 
crystalline purity of tone, perfect clearness of articulation 
and broad and graceful bowing. With all her virtuosity, she 
has fortunately resisted the virtuoso's besetting temptation 
and every year has given fresh evidence of her reverent 
study and sympathetic comprehension of great violin classics. 
Portions of the most popular of these - the Mendelssohn 
Concerto - appear among her Gramophone records, which also 
include two lighter pieces which have figured again and ag 
again on her programmes - Saint SaSns* "Le Cygne", and the 
"Perpetuum Mobile" by Ries. 

MARK HAMBOURG 

was bom in 1879 at Bogoutchar, a town situated on the river 
Don in the government of Voronej, Southern Russia. After a 
thorough training at the hands of his father, Professor 
Michael Hambourg, he made his debut as a prodigy pianist at 
a Moscow Philharmonic concert in 1889, and in the following 
year he paid his first visit to England in the same capacity. 
In 1891 his father, acting wisely under the advice of Richter 
and others, withdrew him from public life and sent him to 
study with Leschetizky at Vienna. Here, in the course of 
three years, he won the Liszt Scholarship, became 
Leschetizky' s favourite pupil, and was designated as Rubin- 
stein's legitimate successor by the great Anton himself. An 
extract from a fellow-pupil's diary gives a vivid picture of 
him in class. "He marched up to the piano and sat down as 
usual, with a jerk, looking like a juvenile thunder-cloud... 
When he stopped we burst into a storm of applause, but, grim 
little hero that he is, he was off into the drawing room 
almost before we began to clap. Professor turned round to 
us and murmured, 'He has a future — he can play.'" 

From the beginning Dr. Hans Richter had followed young 
Hambourg' s career with the greatest interest, and in 1895 he 
invited him to make what we may regard as his proper debut 
at one of the concerts of the Vienna Philharmonic Scoiety.In 
the same year he began his first Australian tour, in 1897 he 
was heard in Paris and Berlin; his first visit to America 
was in 1899* In the meantime he revisited England, and in 
1901 he came back, a grown man to the land which he has since 
adopted, with the proper leagl formulae, for his own. In 1905 
he joined with his father and his accomplished brothers, Jdn 
the violinist, and Boris the 'cellist, in establishing a new 
Conservatory of Music in London. 

From the beginning of his career Mark Hambourg has been a 
continual source of anxiety to fatherly critics. While 
admittting his extraordinary technical powers, they have 
taken every opportunity of warning him against "excessive 
Athleticism" - their polite phrase for downright thumping - 
and of imploring him to subdue his own masterful personality 
to the point of giving the composer's own intentions a 
chance. But he remains impenitent and unconvinced. "These 
people", he writes, "forget that the piano is an instrument 
of contrasts, that it needs variety of colour and dynamic 
effects. . . From the very name (piano- forte) we get the 
idea of great contrasts." And again - "The stronger the 
individuality of the interpreter, the more effective the 
rendering." Meanwhile he continues to carry his audiences 
off their feet, and, as Rubinstein's designated successor, is 
allowed Rubinstein's privilege of playing better or worse 
than anybody else, as the mood may take him. How exquisitely 


2115 

delicate and refined he can be when he pleases may be seen 
by the records he has made of portions of the Moonlight 
Sonata and of two little pieces by Scarlatti. 

JOHN HARRISON 

is a Lancashire man, and at one time was engaged as a warp- 
setter in a factory at Colne. Joining a choir, and singing 
solos at local concerts, he was heard at length by Mrs .Clegg 
who drew Sir Charles Santley's attention to him. Santley 
sent him to Mr. Hugo GSrlitz, with a letter which ran: "Here 
is a fine thing for you in baritones - if I told you what I 
think, you would imagine I was exaggerating, so I leave you 
to judge for yourself." Judging for himself, GSrlitz decided 
that our subject was a tenor, not a baritone, and as a tenor 
he was trained by Madame Amy Sherwin. Since then he has 
appeared at concerts and festivals innumerable, including 
the Richard Strauss Festival of 1903, the Birmingham Festival 
the Liverpool Philharmonic, etc. He has also toured in 
Australia, and made some appearances in Covent Garden Opera. 

Mr. Harrison's voice is one of those that reproduce more than 
ordinarily well on a talking machine. He has made a most 
extensive series of records for the Gramophone Company, 
including the tenor solos in "The Messiah", duets with 
Perceval Allen and Robert Radford, and many of those old 
English ballads which he sings with such compelling charm. 

ERNESTINE SCHUMANN - HEINK 
was bom at Lieben, near Prague on 15th. June, 1861, her 
maiden name being Roessler. She studied with Mariette von 
Leclair at Graz, and made her debut in 1878 at Dresden, as 
Azucena in "II Trovatore". After four seasons at Dresden, she 
accepted an engagement at the City Theatre, Hamburg, where 
she remained for many years. Coming to England in 1892, she 
made her Covent Garden dlbut as Erda in "Siegfried", with 
Alvary and Rosa Sucher, and took part, at Drury Lane, in the 
first English performance of Nesseler's "Trompeter von 
SSkkingen". From 1897 to 1900 she appeared regularly at 
Covent Garden, chiefly in Wagner parts. Her first appearance 
at Bayreuth was in 1896, her first visit to America (where 
she now resides) in 1898. 

Once, in 1904, Madame Schumann-Heink condescended to musical 
comedy, but that has been forgiven and will be forgotten long 
before the memory fades of her masterly singing and acting 
as Ortrud, Erda, and Waltraute. The impressive warning which 
Erda addresses to Wotan at the end of "Das Rheingold" will 
be found among her Gramophone records. 

Madame Schumann-Heink has thrice been married. Her present 
husband, Herr Bopp, is a Chicago newspaper proprietor. 

WILHELM HEROLD 

was bom in Denmark, studied in Paris with Jean de Reszke's 
celebrated master, Sbriglia, and made his dlbut at the Royal 
Operaj Copenhagen, as Faust. In 1903 Dr. Hans Richter heard 
him in Copenhagen and procured him an engagement for the 
Grand Opera season at Covent Garden in the following year, 
when he made a great impression, both as an admirable singer 
and as an actor possessing the power of revivifying well- 
worn parts with innumerable fresh and unconventional touches. 
His services were at once secured by the Covent Garden 
management for the three following years, and, London 
became familiar with him in the parts of Walther, Lohengrin 
(an especially fine creation), Don Josl, Turiddu, Canio and 
others. Herold also took part in Van Dyck's ill-starred 
winter season here in 1 907. In 1906 he made his Berlin 
debut as a "guest" of the Royal Opera Company, and won 
golden opinions. He has also played in Stockholm and 
Christiana, holds the position of Court singer to the King 
of Denmark, and possesses two orders bestowed upon him by the 
King of Sweden. It is no secret that Queen Alexandra has 
followed Herr Herold's career with great interest. 

(To be continued in our future issues) 



2116 


RECORD 


REVIEWS 


HARRY HEMSLEY was a clever man, who when 
training to be a bass singer found that he could speak in a 
childlike voice extremely convincingly. So good did he 
become that he abandoned his singing career to become an 
entertainer with his •children* around him. This act was 
ideal for radio and, of course, records. 

I have been listening carefully to this cassette and find it 
quite extraordinary that throughout each sketch each child 
character's voice is maintained distinctively. There is no 
mistaking, say, Johnnie for Elsie - and so on. So Harry 
Hemsley was able to produce a different falsetto for each 
child in its own way, and never becomes confused about which 
he is producing. He also understood children for his family 
act like children did then - and as they still do. Perhaps 
his son might have some interesting experiences about / with 
father which he could tell us. Harry Hemsley died in 1951 • 

In this selection we have * Playing at schools*, 'They all 
blame me', 'Jack the giant killer', 'Christmas presents' , 'The 
children go carolling' (with other children), 'Lather Father', 
The kids and the Char go out shopping (with Suzette Tarri), 
'Doin' a bit of busking* , 

This excellent cassette "More of Harry Hemsley, with his 
Radio Family* has been produced by his son Norman as a 
further tribute to his father who has somehow been overlooked 
by the mainstream of 'Nostalgia' that concentrates upon sing- 
ers and band enterta inm ent. 

It is available from N H P, 19 Lancaster Street, Lewes, 

E Sussex, BN7 2PX. Price £ 3*95 including postage. 


BING CROSBY 

Bing Crosby really needs no introduction . . He became an 
institution, as the saying is. 

Although reissues of his 78 rpm discs were first made in 1948 
when Lps began, since when there have been compilations upon 
compilations, they have been produced with the usual aim of 
making fortunes for the producers. Thus it has been that the 
same songs have been trotted out repeatedly while some have 
never been presented. 

We have told you previously that J 0 N Z 0 records has the 
aim of issuing on Lp the whole of Bing's 78 rpm 'output*. 

They are not rushing them out, but doing it gradually, so 
that we are now at volumes 6 and 7« The high standard of 
transfer by John R. T. Davies is maintained, a 'gatefold' 
record sleeve is used to give us rare photographs and full 
notes and 'critiques* by Colin Pugh. We have a picture of the 
full Whiteman Band while broadcasting in May, 1 929* all 
players being named for us. With vols. 6 & 7 we reach April, 
1929« Like Mr. Pugh, I think that 'If I had you' and 'My 
Angelina ' are the two 'top* tunes from the collections here, 
the former with Sam Lanin and the other with a "muted" Paul 
Whiteman orchestra. 'My kinda love' and 'Till we meet again 
accompanied by just viola, guitar and piano are very attract- 
ive. It seems that these two were the first recordings by 
Bing under his own name. 

Paul Whiteman's Rhythm Boys sing Wa Da Da, That's Grandma, 

My suppressed desire, Rhythm King, So the bluebirds and the 
balckbirds got together, Louise. With Paul Whiteman's Orch. 
Bing also sings Coquette, Louise, I'm in seventh heaven , 
Tain't so honey, I'd rather cry over you, I'm on the crest of 
a wave, That's my weakness now, Georgie Porgie, Lonesome in 
the moonlight, Because my baby don't mean maybe now, Out of 
town gal, Christmas Melodies (carols), Let's do it, Makin* 
Whoopee. With Sam Lanin are I'll get by, Rose of Mandalay, 
I'm crazy over you, Susianna, If I had you. With the Dorsey 
Brothers are The spell of the blues, Let's do it, My kinda 
love. 

Although the chief singer is the same, Bing Crosby, we have a 
great variety of arrangements and interpretations as we go 
along - even those of Paul Whiteman. 

If you are unable to obtain any of the seven Jonzo volumes 
from your local shop, write directly to Jonzo Records, 

P T 0. Box 212, Harrow, Middx HA. 3 7LD. Price of each 

Jonzo Vol. 8 should be ready by the time you read this. 


NOEL COWARD - 


From 'Operette'we hear 'Countess Mitzi' and 'Operette'sung by 
the vivacious Fritzi Massary brought out of retirement to 
play a part admirably suited for her. Peggy Wood sang • 
•Dearest Love' and Coward recorded 'Gipsy Melody* which was us 
used only for the trial run in Manchester, Undoubtedly the 
best-remembered tune is 'The Stately Homes of England* sung by 
a group of young gentlemen. 

The final show featured in this set is 'Ace of Clubs' from 
1950» which is 'modem' being set in a Soho night club, 
starring Pat Kirkwood and Graham Payn. 

From a plot of spivs and gangsters emerged a musical score of 
attractive times. The cast-recordings were made as medleys by 
Miss Kirkwood, Mr. Payn and Sylvia Cecil. These include 
•Chase me Charlie* (about cats), 'My kind of man*, and 'In a 
boat on a lake'. Sir NoSl recorded some of the songs himself 
including the witty 'I like America' and 'Josephine'. As one 
expects there was a song by a group of males; this time the 
funny trio 'Juvenile Delinquents*. 

This is an excellent array of NoSl Coward to add to your 
collection. 

WORLD RECORDS SHB 179 


LAUREL and HARDY 

This was another surprise, A little 7-iach square package 
came in through my door containing a 45 rpm 'single* by Stan 
Laurel and Oliver Hardy, having been taken from the soundtrack 
of the 1939 film 'The Flying Deuces*. The sound quality is a 
bit inferior to 78rpm discs of the time. Upon it we hear 
Oliver Hardy sing 'Shine on harvest moon'. If it had been a 
studio recording we would have heard that he had a very pleasant 
singing voice - well it was still pleasant on film, but the 
medium made it dead-toned. The reverse is 'The world is 
waiting for the sunrise 'played as a harp solo, presumably by 
Stan Laurel, appropriately for our two heroes were due to be 
shot at dawn* 

The manufacturers hoped that this release would gain as high a 
popularity as 'The trail of the lonesome pine' some years ago. 
That part of it is no concern of mine. However, it is an 
interesting item for one has little of these two on record.They 
were film-makers and for the most part kept to that. It will 
be an ideal re-issue for filn/ Laurel & Hardy enthusiasts. 

COLUMBIA DB9145 


LOUIS ARMSTRONG 

Once upon a time World Records issued a boxed-set of the early 
recordings by Louis Armstrong. Since the purchase of the EMI 
group by others, some of the original series have returned and 
new issues have appeared. Louis Armstrong is gradually being 
'restored* to the lists one Lp at a time. 

All but one tune of the eighteen tunes in this collection were 
recorded during 1928. It includes the two when Louis played 
with Carroll Dickerson's Orchestra (Sa voyagers Stomp and Sym- 
phonic Raps) which in 78-days were available only in Argentine 
but they are fine rhythmical tunes. 

We have Louis Armstrong and his Hot Five- West End Blues, Sugar 
Foot Strut, Two Deuces, Squeeze Me, Knee Drops. His duet with 
pianist Earl Hines - Weather Bird. Louis and his Savoy Ball- 
room Five - No one else but you, Beau Koo Jack, Save it, pretty 
mama, Heah me talkin to ya, St James* Infirmary, Tight like 
this. Louis Armstrong, and his orchestra- No, papa, no, Basin 
Street Blues, Muggles, Knockin' a jug. 

The Carroll Dickerson band was large, but all of the other 
times are played by small groups of about six musioians. It is 
a kind of 'chamber-music' jazz played in an exemplary way by 
experts. This record is intended for the connoiseurs, but it 
would be one of the ideal examples for those wishing to 'learn' 
what earlier type of jazz comprised. It is 'straightforward', 
'uncluttered* and similar adjectives! It is always refreshi n g 
for long-time jazzfans who have no doubt listened to / or have 
been unable to avoid (11) modem jazz / pop music, to go back 
to a record like this which states basic essentials. 

WORLD RECORDS SH407 


THE GREAT SHOWS 

The art of NoSl Coward was multi-faceted for he wrote JOE LOSS & His Orchestra - 

straight plays as well as musical shows and appearing as a REMEMBERME? 


single-act in cabaret. This set brings us examples of five 
of his shows and as some of the recordings are solos by 
Coward we get a tiny glimpse of his cabaret-self, but only a 
glimpse as one will know after hearing recordings of his 
cabaret turns using specially prepared material. 

The American Peggy Wood was leading lady to George Metaxa in 
the 1929 'Bitter Sweet* with Ivy Steelier supporting. It is 
very refreshing to hear Metaxa* s light tenor voice if one is 
accustomed only to the Nelson Eddy / Jeannette McDonald film 
version. Metaxa' s approach is more lyrical and Peg g Wood's 
is strong to carry the part. 

Although leaning towards the Viennese idiom in earlier shows 
Coward's crisp dialogue and lyrics, especially in his songs, 
were always more sophisticated becoming more apparent in 
those which he sang himself for his voice inflects the 
appropriate tone or insinuation. 

The actual artists of 'Cavalcade* (telling the story of a 
family through several generations) recorded nothing from it. 
The show incorporated some songs of others. Sir Noel recorded 
his own 'Lover of my dreams* and 'Twentieth Century Blues*. 

With 'Conversation Piece* of 1934, Coward returned to a more 
conventional musical show set in 1811 written for Yvonne 


Joe Loss haslod a <MSie¥'x>rehestra for over fifty years and 
although nearly 77 years old, still leads one now. This Lp is 
culled from the years 1 93^ - 1939» when British dance bands 
reached their peak of musical perfection. 

This compilation includes all of the rhythms of the day, plus 
•The Palais Glide* - a 'social' type of dance so popular just 
prior to World War II. There are twenty 'tracks* but as some 
are medleys, we have some 28 individual tunes played. The 
personnel of the orchestra remained virtually the same through 
the period of this Lp. We hear Monte Rey as the vocalist for 
•Penny Serenade', but Chick Henderson is the main singer, with 
a few by Sam Costa and Shirley Lenner. 

A selection of waltzes brings us the old favourites Ramona, 
Diane, Charmaine. From the films are Lullaby of Breadway, Tip 
toe through the tulips, If I had a talking picture of you, and, 
surprisingly Felix Kept on walking which I thought was passe 
by 1937. 

Even though War was approaching, most people thought it was a 
dark cloud that would just manage to go past, so we had tunes 
like There's a new world and With plenty of money and you. The 
Penny Serenade from Holland was a great hit, earning its 
composers far more than thatl 


Printempg who played the leading role. The big nunber, ■I'll Thia ia a ^ cross ^ eotion of vha t Joe Uas ra8 playill g m 
follow my secret heart' was a dnet for Miss Prmtemps and Srr ^ ^ 1?30 , a _ auoh t0 Ms oredit ^ our enioyl ,ent 

NoSl whom we hear. Comedy numbers are provided by four men- then> as n0 „ they are re-issued, 
about-town 'Regency Rakes* and Heather Thatcher and Moya Nugent 

telling 'There's always something fishy about the French*. WORLD RECORDS S H 5 0 6 


THE GREAT WAR 

(An evocation in music and drama through recordings made at the 

time) 

As the sleeve note says, ' ..no set of records, however large, 
could possibly do justice to so vast an event as The Great War' 
(1914 - 1918). Personally, I would use something other than the 
phrase 'to do justice* for nobody can praise war, but I under- 
stand what is meant. Thus we have two Lp's of recordings, 
nearly all made during the war years, but all reflecting the 
sentiments of those times. 

It is a fine cross-aection of emotions and hopes of the times, 
seen through the eyes of popular music and sketches, which are 
the best mirror of the times. Having been a boy when many of 
the mangled bodies of those injured and maimed in that war were 
frequently seen on the streets, I wish songs had been written 
about that too, as permanent reminders. We have the notorious 
recording of gas-shells being fired. The enemy fired them too 
and I personally knew three men who lived long and physically- 
miserable lives after breathing poison-gas. 

Being before radio with its omnipresent microphones, some small 
substitute was found in "descriptive" records, in which such 
scenes as 'Leaving for the front* , 'Departure of a troopship', 
'Landing of the British in France*, 'With our boys at the front) 
'In the trenches', 'An air raid', 'The big push', etc. could 
give but small account of the real events. Historically, though, 
they are interesting documents because of attitudes and opinions 
expressed. . . But that was not their original intention! 
(Elsewhere, we'll try to find space for 'The Bloke Wot's Left 
Behind' - a revaling expression of attitudes.) We hear a rather 
strange narration by Sergeant E. Dwyer V.C. who was clearly 
overwhelmed by the recording machine and a little inarticulate. 

John McCormack sings 'It's a long way to Tipperary* with a fine 
bunch of singers as his chorus - Reinald Werrenrath, William 
Hooley and Harry MacDonough; and 'Roses of Picardy* which if I 
may judge from my uncles, was a favourite song among the 
soldiers towards the end of the Great War. Other great singers 
- such as Gervaise Elwes sings 'In summertime on Bredon* , Louise 
Kirkby-Lunn with 'Have you any news of my boy Jack?'. Lighter 
pieces are ' Smeke Clouds' by Herbert Payne; 'Over There* by 
Caruso, 'Never mind the food controller', by Florrie Forde, 'A 
bachelor gay* by Peter Dawson and 'How ya gonna keep 'em down 
on the farm?* by Harry Fay. 

There is an error with the Peter Dawson .song. The version here 
is the ' remake' 19th, November 1923.The original 1917 matrix was 
Ho 3531 of 30th. Mar, 1917* But it's of no consequence for the 
song is from the immensely popular show 'The Maid of the Mount- 
ains'. We also have a selection from 'Chu Chin Chow*, and 'The 
Bing Boys are Here* is of course represented with Violet 
Lorraine and George Robey singing 'If you were the only girl in 
the world* , these two shows being equally popular - all songs 
clearly being of the highest quality. 

Within the compass of two Lps, Pearl Records give us representive 
recordings of the emotions, events and entertainment of The 
Great War, approaching it from various angles, as far as records 
allow. There must have been more cynical songs like 'If you 
want to find the Sergeant-Major' that were never recordedl 

PEARL RECORDS GEMM 303/304 


DAME CLARA BUTT 

Side 1 is mostly of recordings from 1929 and 1930, electrical of 
course; while side 2 is mostly 1917 to 191?« 

As Clara Butt became older, her voice became deeper, though the 
beauty of it remained unimpaired. Her expression and interpretat 
ion were still magnificent in 1930 as ever. 

The earliest recording here is the famous duet with her husband, 
Kennerley Rumford,from 1910, 'The Keys of Heaven* , which must 
surely be one of the most beautiful interpretations of the song. 

Clara Butt sang 'The Enchantress' - a powerful song - very power- 
fully for her audition for acceptance to the Royal College of 
Music. By the time of this recording, 1917, "he Lad obviously 
learned much about expression and delivery. 

It is wrong to assume that Dame Clara Butt always sang double- 
forte. In many of the songs she becomes very quiet and tender. 
The range of her voice was amazingly wide. 

The pieces chosen for this compilation are Abide with me, Land of 
Hope and Glory, 0 Divine Redeemer, 0 rest in the Lord, The Lost 
Chord, The Holy City, Annie Laurie, The Old Folks at home, Love's 
Old Sweet Song, Ombra Mai Fu, Barbara Allen, God save the King. 

If you not already admire Dame Clara Butt's work, this will 
provide a well-balanced introduction and will convince you that 
it is a pity that she has become associated with the notion that 
she devoted her singing to patriotic songs and hymns at 
•Armistice Day* celebrations. 

PEARL GEMM 301 


SPARKY RETURNS 

Early in the 1950's Capitol records introduced some 78 rpm records 
which later went on to 45 rpm 'extended' play telling the stories of 
of the little boy who had two main adventures. ... 
'SPARKY'S MAGIC PIANO* 

The little boy had a dream which, we presume, showed him that 
devotion to his practising would transform him to the ranks of 
concert pianists, or at ]^as£ the pleasurable experience of playing 

well. His magic piano enabled him tw undertake a concert tour of 
the U. S. A., culminating with a recital at Carnegie Hall, where 
disastrously, the magic ran out, and among the consternation and 
general clamour, Sparky awoke te his mother's calling. Through 
it all we are introduced to tuneful selections of classical music, 
for which the real pianist is Raymond Turner, the orchestra being 
arranged and directed by Billy May. 



‘•SPARKY AND THE MAGIC TRAIN* 
introduces us again to a fantasy. This time Sparky, who lives 
by the railway line is like any self-respecting boy in similar 
circumstance and soon learns all there is to know about the 
passing trains, which naturally enough, speak to him. On a 
journey with his father Sparky knew that something was amiss 
with a wheel beneath him, and, stopping the train, averts a 
terrible disaster. 

These stories delighted my nieces and nephews when originally 
published. This Christmas, in their new Lp form, they charmed 
ay great-nieces and nephews. Two good stories on one Lp that 
make an ideal gift for any young relations you have. You will 
enjoy them too, without doubt, 

CAPITOL EMS1188 


JACKIE GLEASON *Silk »n* Brass' 

Mr, Gleason is American and is probably unknown to most people 
in Britain, He led a swing band after World War II, and could 
also be described as "sometime comedian". For this Lp, issued 
originally in 1 965 , he organised a band featuring four trumpets 
four trombones and four french horns, with a swing band rhythm 
section. This is a record which you will have to hear to 
decide if it is for you. There are some clever arrangements, 
and as you might expect, the brass instruments make themselves 
heard, but to my ears there is a little too much screech at 
one end of the scale and too much snarl at the other. The rec- 
cord is intended for officianados of the "big Band" scene of 
more recent years when they have become 'concert bands' rather 
than to be danced to. One must admit that the musicians play 
with great precision and attack. It might also prove very 
interesting to those who follow the brass band 'movement', for 
while 'swing-based' there are interesting tone colours and 
subtle section-work. 

The tunes are Girls of the Folies Bergere, The girl from 
Ipanema, It's such a happy day, Everything's coming up roses, 
Real live girl, Starry eyed and breathless, Begin to love, 
Shngri-la, If I ruled the world, Somebody else is taking my 

place ' CAPITOL EMS1182 


JUNE HUTTON with music by 

ALEX STORDAHL 

This Lp was released in Britain in 1955 in an abridged 10-inch 
Lp format, now restored to 12-inches. 

June Hutton became the lead-voice in the singing group The Pied 
Pipers who were with Tommy Dorsey's orchestra. Alex Stordahl 
was an arranger for Mir, Dorsey, and also made arrangements 
for accompaniments for Frank Sinatra. 

Keeping the story brief, June Hutton left the Dorsey entourage 
to become a solo act, and to become Mrs. Stordahl! 

Although monophonic, the recording quality is bright and crisp 
as later 78 rpm discs became. Miss Hutton is a pleasant-voiced 
crooner, and most of the songs here are in a slow tempo with a 
band accompaniment to accentuate the 'romantic' persuasion 
thereof. If you know the style - the singing is in the mould 
of Peggy Lee, Jo Stafford, Julie London. Again, if this is 
your sort of delight, you will find this record among the best. 

The songs are, Never in a million years, Gone with the wind, 
Until the real thing comes along, I should care, It's the talk 
of the town, You're getting to be a habit with me, Day be day, 
East of the sun and west of the moon, Taking a chance on love, 
I hadn't anyone till you, My baby just cares for me, Dream a 
little dream of me. 

CAPITOL EMS1184 


THE JONAH JONES ftUARTET with 
GLEN GRAY & The Great Casa Loma Band 

Both Jonah Jones and Glen Gray go right back into the history 
of jazz music, but with perhaps the exception of Manny Klein, 
most of the Band here are more* recent* musicians. This Lp is 
a reissue of 1962 material. 

Basically, this is a spotlight for Jonah Jones* trumpet playing 
so the times 'Echoes of Harlem* and 'Boy meets horn', which 
Duke Ellington wrote for trumpeters, are the best vehicles. 

'Hot Lips' was composed by Paul Whiteman's long-time trumpeter 
Henry Busse and still sounds fresh. 

Sugar Blues and West End Blues, also old numbers, both by Clar- 
ence Williams suit Mr. Jones. 

The big band accompaniment seems superfluous for this trumpeter 
whose best situation is in a small group. Presumably this 
recording date is aimed for the 'big band' fans for that was 
Glen Gray's position at that time. For those fans this will be 
a delight. 

The other tunes played are Baubles, bangles and beads; 
o'clock jump; I can't get started; After you've gone ; Tenderly 
Ciribibin; Apollo Jumps. 

CAPITOL EMS 1185 


LESLIE 'HUTCH* HUTCHINSON 
•You and the night and the music* 

Leslie Hutchinson was a polished entertainer, singing at the 
piano with a clear enunciation giving full meaning to the songs 
he sang. 

He had recorded as accompanist to singers like Helen Morgan, 
Alice Morley and Ruth Coleman. He was in a C. B. Cochran 
review in 1927* and at that time made a test recording for HMV 
but the 'option* was not taken up. He did record four tunes 
SINGING duets with Opal Cooper for Vocalion records. He had 
SUNG with Cooper prior to coming to Britain (in Paris}. Later, 
he recorded for Parlophone. From then on he was an exclusive 
Parlophone artist singing to his own accompaniment .He did make 


a limited number of piano-* olo recordings, which put him among 
the top popular pianists. 

The selection on this record, twenty tunes, dates from 1930 to 
1935. Six of them are with an orchestra, but its role is an 
oddly minor one, playing only for a small part of each tune'. 
Those tunes are Maybe I love you too much, My wishing song, 

Love is everywhere, Wake, Two tired eyes, Kiss me goodnight. 

A surprise came when I heard Hutch singing (on this LP) As I 
sit here, by Tempest and Sanderson, which one associates 
mostly with 'concert* singers. Hutch gives a quietly intro- 
spective, or, reflective interpretation that throws new mean- 
ing on to the words. 

Somewhat strangely, the earlier years of the present 
•nostalgia' stream neglected Hutch. Several years passed, then 
there was a doubleup. Gradually we have been treated to more. 
This reluctance is surprising, for at his theatre -appearances 
Hutch was immensely popular. 

However, his fans have a generous selection on this Lp that 
shows the width of his repertoire. We also have, She's my 
secret passion, Out of nowhere, Close your eyes, Life is just 
a bowl of cherries, Did you ever see a dream walking, Close 
your eyes, That's love, Blue moon, I only have eyes for you, 
You and the night and the music. 

An excellent record for Hutch fans. 

SAVILLE SVL 183 


LAYTON AND JOHNSTONE 

•When you're smiling' 

This team of American duetists had the world of British enter- 
tainment in the palms of their hands until Mr. Johnstone's 
indiscretion and return to U S A. They had maintained their 
popularity from 1924 until 1935 with a simple style of duets 
with Layton's piano accompaniment. (Layton continued as a solo 
act, recording frequently until 19*8, dying in London at an 
advanced age in 1978). 

The two harmonised in a 'traditional* style very pleasantly and 
their 'vehicles* were any type of popular songs of the day, 
slow or fast, jolly or sad. Each vocalist took 'solo' sections 
as did the pianist (Mr, Layton). Their version presented all 
the essentials of a song. 

Like any other artists, they did not feature only those songs 
that reached greatest popularity, presumably choosing those 
most suited to themselves melodically. The earliest recording 
here is from December, 1925* I wonder where my baby is tonight 
to, I like to go back in the evening, from September, 1933. 

In between we have My pal Harry, Meadow lark, Ramona, Dawning, 
After my laughter came tears, Sunny skies, Get our and get 
under the moon, Was it a dream?, Bluebird sing me a song, I'll 
never ask for more, Deep night, If I had a talking picture of 
you, Ro-ro-rollin* along, Stein song, When you're smiling, Har 
mony heaven, I gotta right to sing the blues, Lazybones. 

SAVILLE S7L1 80 


AMBROSE and his ORCHESTRA - 

* ' s wonderful' 

From 1928 - 1930 we have twenty tunes from the great dance band 
of Bert Ambrose which was resident at that time in the May 
Fair Hotel, for which Lou Abelardo sings most of the vocal 
refrains. 

The majority of the records reissued here are from the old 
British Brunswick or the newly-formed Decca companies, which 
are exceptionally difficult to find in their original form now. 

They show that Ambrose was one of the world's finest dance 
bands, whose arrangements were chiefly, at that time, from the 
pens of either Lew Stone er Bert Read, the pianist. The tonal 
quality of these Ambrose originals often leaves much to be 
desired, but John Wadley has done a good job, so we are able 
to appreciate their subtleties. There are songs like, Love is 
a dreamer, which I didn't remember, nor She's such a comfort 
to me. After having so many 'jazzed-up' versions of Just you- 
just me, it is refreshing to hear a straight version with Lou 
Abelardo singing the words. 

The other tunes included by this top British dance band are 
• swonderful, Roll- away clouds, Louise, An ild Italian song, 

I'll see you again, If love were all, s ingin' in the rain, Too 
wonderful for words, Ain't misbehavin', Am I blue?, The thought 
never entered my head, How am I to know?, My sweeter than sweet 
Piccolo Pete, My love parade, A little kiss each morning, Lucky 
me - lovable you. 

SAVILLE SVL 181 


'FAT S' WALLER & HIS RHYTHM 
- Armful of sweetness 

Fats Waller died around Christmas Time in 1943 aged only 39 » 
but his popularity remains perenniel. He was a prolific 
recorder, and at a rough guess, forty Lps might cover his work. 
He recorded a small number of piano and organ solos, and a few 
more tunes within other bands (as a guest I suppose), but the 
majority of his output was with various small jazz-oriented 
groups which he called his 'Rhythm*. Usually he took popular 
songs of the day gave them a going over. - This included 
performing them fairly straight or completely 'guyed* as the 
mood took him. He was primarily an entertainer and while play- 
ing the piano, whether on stage or in a cabaret would give 
conspiritorial winks at the people sitting nearest. Between 
tunes he might engage them in conversation or share jokes with 
them from the piano stool. If you have heard Fats Waller 
records you will know what to expect. He had tunes of all 
speeds, some are quite slow and tender. The twenty tunes in 
this selection are all from the year 1934 and include two of 
his own - the well-known Honeysuckle Rose and the lesser-known 
How can you face me? 

The other tunes are Armful of sweetness, A porter's lovesong to 
a chamber maid, I wish I were twins, Do me a favour, Georgia 
May, Then I'll be tired of you, Don't let it bother you, Have a 
little dream on me, Serenade to a wealthy widow, Sweetie pie. 


Mandy, Let's pretend there's a moon, You're not the only 
oyster in the stew, Believe it beloved, Dream man, I'm growing 
fonder of you, If it isn't love, Breakin' the ice. 

SAVILLE SVL 182 


THE BOSWELL SISTERS 

- You oughta be in pictures 

These three young ladies were bom in New Orleans and made their 
first records in 1925. This Lp gives us 18 songs from the 1 932— 
1934 period, mostly accompanied by the Dorsey Brothers Orchestra 
and those of Jimmie Grier and Victor Young. Although Connie 
Boswell was confined to a wheelchair from suffering polio in 
infancy, it in.no way deterred her and she continued as a solo 
act for many years after the Trio broke up when they married in 
the mid-1 930's, 

By the time these records were made, they performed close 
together, enabling them to stand close to the microphone, sing 
quieter and more intimately. Their style was based on jazz and 
hot dance band style, rather than that of a big swing band that 
was favoured by the Andrews Sisters and the various "sisters" 
groups which came later. 

Connie Boswell was seemingly the leader and undertook most of 
the solo parts. Many of their arrangements were not really 
jazzy at all. If I had a million dollars is "straight" as is 
Stop the sun, stop the moon. 

Their individuality of style causes them to still be remembered 
favourably some fifty years after their 'dissolution' and 
collectors still seek their 78 rpm discs. Here we have some 
consolation in this pleasant selection, presumably by Hugh 
Palmer who wrote the sleeve notes. 

The other tunes are, Alexander's Ragtime Band, You oughta be in 
pictures, Doggone I've done it, I hate myself, Goin' Home, 
Louisiana hayride, The object of my affection, Old Yazoo, 
Sentimental gentleman from Georgia, It don't mean a thing, Rock 
and roll, Minnie the Moocher's wedding day, If it ain't love, 
Lonesome Road, There'll be some changes made, Mood Indigo. 
CONIFER CHD 1 3 6 


GERALDO - Tip Top Tunes 

Gerald Bright had led dance bands and returning to London from a 
South American visit, opened at the Savoy Hotel with his Gaucho 
Tango Orchestra^ but became "conventional" in 1933. In Novem- 
ber, 1940, he became contracted to the B B C to provide a dance 
band for the London area. He had an extremely busy schedule 
during the war years, making frequent visits to "The Forces" in 
the fighting zones. From early in 1946 he gave weekly 
programmes in the BBC Overseas Service in a series titled 'Tip 
Top Tunes'j for which he used three main "combinations" - The 
Geraldo Dance Orchestra, The Concert Orchestra, The Geraldo 
Strings. Being broadcasts, the tunes were not restricted to the 
length of a 78 rpm record.This is an important reissue. 

The selection for this Lp is taken from private "acetates" which 
Geraldo had made from the radio programmes. He himself plays the 
piano in Autumn Concerto with the vocal chorus sung by Roy 
Edwards, from a programme of the late 1950's. There are many 
interesting arrangements, quite different from those on 78 rpm 
discs. As the 'Tip Top Tunes' drew upon music from any period 
in "history", we have here tunes that Geraldo never recorded. 

We have Hello Again (signature tune), My heart stood still, 
There's a small hotel, Heather of the hill, Rockin' through 
Dixie, Nature boy, What is this thing called love?, I'm on a see 
saw, So many times have I cried over you, When Johnny comes 
marching home, Begin the beguine, The Isle of Innisfree, Top Hat 
Arkansas Traveller, In a little Spanish town, The nearness of 
you, Hallelujah, Getting nowhere. 

CONIFER CHD 135 


NOTE: If you prefer your music on cassette - tapes, most of 
the items we have reviewed are available in that form 

COMMENTiln your reviewers opinion, the remastering by 
Colin Brown for Conifer records (and Decca) 
removes too much of the treble frequencies. 


A little while back your Editor received the 
notice From Francis Antony Ltd. that as from 
April, 1987, they will discontinue the monthly 
publications 'The New Records’ (began 1951) 
'The New Singles' (began 1963) 
'The New Cassettes' (began 1970) 
Your Editor has subscribed to 'The New 
Records' since early 1953 and has Found the 
little monthly booklet exceedingly useful 
over all those years, - and still does. . 
The modern 'haphazard' way of marketing 
records means that sales have dropped to 
the point where publication cannot continue 
without losing money For Francis Anthony Ltd. 
While sad that this decision had to be made, 
I wish to publicly thank the compilers of 
these little booklets and the publishers For 
their excellent service to record collectors 
and researchers. I know I shall treasure 
my own copies For they will provide excellent 
reference sources in the Future. Also, I 
shall ensure that I bequeath them to a 
reference library, For there cannot be many 
sets as complete as mine. 
****$**************** 
Wanted The Vocalion records of duets by 

Opal Cooper and Leslie A. Hutchinson 
Ernie Bayly, 19 Glendale Road, 

Bournemouth 1 BH6 4JA . 



2118 


FRANK 


SINATRA 


REISSUES 


The EMI record group nas reissued a very large proportion of the recordings made by Frank 
Sinatra for Capitol during the 1950's and I960* a. I have no discography of the man so am 
unable to say whether the sets represent the whole of his recordings for that label. The 
set comprises either 20 Lps, or 20 cassettes, according to your preference. With it comes a 
well-produced booklet, containing photographs of Sinatra of those days, recording, wearing a 
hat, which seems to have been an indication of an artistes importance!. The book is largely 
a an essay by B B C disc-jockey Alan Dell, giving a brief account of Sinatra at the time of 
the recordings. It make a very significant point that just prior to his first recording for 
Capitol, Sinatra's career was at a very low ebb, perhaps due somewhat to his own nature, 
but going to Capitol, a relative newcomer to the record-scene then, with its 'fresh' 
approach and 'new' musical directors and orchestral leaders looking for bright ways to 
present new and minor artists, or old favourites. Thus, Frank Sinatra began his 'second- 
career* ,shoek off his despondency, and all the rest we know. The sparkling recordings at 
Capitol made a new man of him, as it were. Conjecture make us wonder how far down he might 
have sank, or might he have remained at a lower grade as something a little passe. Nelson 
Riddle conducted the orchestra with arrangements presenting Sinatra as more relaxed, and 
while remaining individual, brought him towards the position to which the popular songs had 
by then arrived. The introduction of tape for master-recordings released him from the time 
limitations of the 78 rpm records with which he had begun his career. 


The set of 20 cassettes in a box should retail at £70 or under, and we presume that the 
equivalent 20 Lps will be somewhat s i m il a r . We have not received a review set, but are able 
to list most of the song titles and original Lp titles. 


♦•Songs for your lovers' 

The girl next door 

They can't take that away from 

Violets for your furs me 

Someone to watch over me 

H." one and only love 

Little girl blue 

Like someone in love 

A foggy day 

It worries me 

I can read between the lines 
I get a kiok out of you 
My funny valentine 
•originally pub. 195* 
w .Nelson Riddle 


♦'Swing Easy* 

Jeepers creepers 
Taking a chance on love 
Varap your troubles in dreams 
Lean baby 
I love you 

I'm gonna sit right down and 
write myself a letter 
Get happy 
All of me 

How could you do a thing Him 
Sunday. that to me 

Why should I cry over you? 
Just one of those things 
•originally published 195* 
w .Nelson Riddle 


♦'Close to you* 

Close to you 
P.S. I love you 
Love locked out 
Everything happens to me 
It's easy to remember 
Don't like good byes 
With every breath I take 
Blame it on my youth 
It could happen to you 
I've had asy moments 
I couldn't sleep a wink 
last night 

The end of a love affair 
•originally pub. 1957 
w. Nelson Riddle 


♦•Where are you?* 

Where are you? 

The night they nailed it a day 
I cover the waterfront 
Maybe you'll be there 
Laura 

Lonely town 

Autumn leaves 

I'm a fool to want you 

I think of you 

Where is the one? 

There's no you 
Baby, won't you please come 
"orig.publlshed 1?57) h0 “ eJ 
w, Gordon Jenkins 


♦•A Swinging Affair' 

Night and day 

I wish I were in love again 
I got plenty o* nuttin* 

I guess I'll have to change 
my plans 

I won't dance 


Nioe work if you can get it 

Stars fell on Alabama 

No one ever tells you 

I got it bad and that ain't 

At long last love good 

The lonesome road 

You be so nice to come home to 


From thiam moment on 

If I had you 

0h f look at me now 

•orig, pub. 1957 
w. Nelson Riddle 


♦'Only the Lonely' 

Only the lonely 
Angel eyes 
What's new? 

It's a lonesome old town 
Willow weep for me 
Good-bye 

Guess I'll hang my tears 
... out to dry 

Ebb tide 

Spring is hear 
Blues in the night 
Gone with the wind 
• orig. pub. 1958 
w. Nelson Riddle 


♦'No one cares' 

When no one cares 
A cottage for sale 
Stormy weatehr 
Where do you go? 

I don't stand a ghost of a 
chance 

Here's that rainy day 
I can't get started 
Why try to change me now? 
Just friends 
I'll never smile again 
None but the lonely heart 
The one I love belongs to 
somebody else 
•pub. originally 1959 
w. Gordon Jenkins 


'Come dance with me' 

Come dance with me 

Something's gotta give 

Just in time 

Dancing in the dark 

Too close for comfort 

I could have danced all night 

Day in - day out 

Cheek to cheek 

Baubles, bangles and beads 

The song is you 

The last dance 

Saturday night 

•orig.pub. I959 

w. Billy May 


'Look to your heart* 

Look to your heart 

Anytime - anywhere 

Not as a stranger 

Our town 

You, my love 

Same old Saturday night 

Fairy tale 

The impatient years 

I could have told you 

When I stop loving you 

If I had three wishes 

I'm gonna live till I die 

•orig. pub. I959 

w. Ray Anthony 


♦ 'All the way* 

All the way 
High hopes 
Talk to me 

French foreign legion 

To love and be loved 

River, stay 'way from my door 

Witchcraft 

It's over, it's over 

01' Mac Donald 

This was my love 

All my tomorrows 

Sleep warm 

•orig. pub. I96I 

w. Nelson Riddle 


♦'Come swing with me* 
Day be day 
Sentimental journey 
Almost like being in 
Five minutes more 
American beauty rose 
Yes indeed 
On the sunny side of 
Lover 

Don't take your love 
That oldbblack magic 
Paper doll 

I've heard that song 
•orig. pub. I96I 
w. Billy May 


♦'Swingin' Session* 

When you're smiling 
Blue moon 

love S* posin' 

It all depends on you 
It's only a paper noon 
My blue heaven 
the street Should I 
street Spetember in the rain 

from me Alwiys 

I can't believe that you're 
in love with me 

before I concentrate on you 

You do something to me 
Orig. pub. I96I 


w. Nelson Riddle 


♦'Nice and Easy' 

Nioe and easy 
That old feeling 
How deep is the ocean 
I've got a crush on you 
You go to my head 
Fools rush in 
Nevertheless 
She's funny that way 
Try a little tenderness 
Embraceable you 
Mam'selle 
Dream 

’ Orig. Pub. i960 
w. Nelson Riddle 


♦'Sinatra Sings of Love A Thi: 
The nearness of you 
Hidden persuasion 
The moon was yellow 
I love Paris 
Monique 
Chicago 

Love looks so well on you 
Mr. Success 
They came to Cordura 
I gotta right to sing the 
blues 

Something wonderful happens 
in the summer 
•Orig. Pub. 1962 
w. Nelson Riddle, Felix 
Slatin, Skip Martin 
(recorded 1957-1962) 


1' ♦'Point of no return 
When the world was young 
I'll remember April 
September song 
A million years ago 
I'll see you again 
There'll never be another 

As time goes by y0U 
Somewhere along the way 
It's a blue world 
These foolish things 
Memories of you 
I'll be seeing you 
•Orig. Pub. 1962 
w. Axel Stordahl 


♦'This is Sinatra* 1 +*This is Sinatra II* 

I've got the world on a string Hey jealous lover 


Three coins in the fountain 
Love and marriage 
From here to eternity 
South of the border 
Rain 

The gale that got away 
Young at heart 
Leamin' the blues 
My one and only love 
The tender trap 
Don't worry 'bout me 


♦•Wee Small hours' 

In the wee small hours of the 
morning 

Mood Indigo 
Glad to be unhappy 


Everybody loves somebody 
Something wonderful happens in 
summer 

H alf as lovely 

You're cheatin' yourself 

You'll always be the one I love 

You forgot all the wrods 

How little we know 

Time after time 

Crazy love 

Johnny Concho theme 

If you are but a dream 

I believe 

So long, ay love 

It's the same old dream 

Put all your dreams away 

♦•Songs for Swingin' lovers' 


♦'Come fly with me' 

Come fly with me 
Around the world 
Isle of Capri 
Moonlight in Vermont 
Autumn in New York 
French Foreign Legion 
It happened in Monterey 
Let's get away from it all 
April in Paris 
London by night 
Brazil 
Blue Hawaii 

It's nice to go trav'lling 


I get along without you very well Pennies from Heaven 


Deep in a dream 
I see your face before me 
Can't we be friends 
When your lover has gone 
What is this things called love? 
Last night when we were young 
I'll be around 
111 wind 

It never entered my head 
Danolng on the ceiling 
I'll never be the same 
This love of mine 


You make me feel so young 
You're getting to be a habit with me 
You brought a new kind of love to me 
Too marvellous for words 
Old devil moon 

Lover is here to stay 4 4 

I've got you under my skin 

I thought about you 

We'll be together again 

Makln' whoopee 

Swinging down the lane 

Anything goes 

How about you 


We were not sent details 
of conductors, original 
Lp dates for all - hence 
our lack in places. Keep 
in mind that some titles 
had existed as 'singles' 
long before being made- 
up into Lp format. 


CYLINDER 


REVIEW 


Surprise, surprise . 

Quite out of the blue I received a make of 
two-minute cylinder of which I had not 
previously heard. FOX RECORD, 
made in England. It is made of a moulded 
plastic material, which will ensure its 
durability, upon a tough rolled card 
inner liner. The plastic is nioely bright 
and shiny as a new cylinder should look. 

I have NOT carried out an Edisonlike test 
upon it of, say, 2000 playings to verify 
its durability. I'll leave that sort of 
thing to someone else. But, it plays very 
oleanly. 


ment is 'hot' in a fine 1920*8 style it does not 
stray far from the original tune. In fact the 
band gives us a well-balanced interpretation 
that fits neatly into its two-minute limitation. 
It was electrically recorded during March, 1986. 

Even though it was eleotrically recorded, it is 
monophonic, so we have a sound medium which 
affords us fine reproduction upon a phonograph. 

Mr. Williams, who leads the 'Jazzers' with his 
trumpet, is an Edison fan , ^explaining his desire 
to chose the two-minute cylinder as a means to 
record his 'group'. 


It is of Williams' Jazzers playing the old 
dance tune 'Sugar', which has a great 
melody line. Do not be deterred by the 
name 'Jazzers' for although the arrange - 


With the scarcity of original wax or * durable ' 
2-minute cylinders, it is laudable that at least 
limited editions of new cylinders are occasionally 
available. It is only logioal for them to be 
moulded in today's plastic materials. I like the 
design on the box label which fully captures the 
spirit of the cylinder era. 

I am sure that you will enjoy this, 
the first issue of FOX RECORDS. It 
is available from Mr. C. Williams, 

21, Park Road, Burntwood, Walsall WS7 0EE. 

Price £7*50 including postage 

♦ ♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ + ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 


♦ REPRINT REVIEW 

♦ 

♦ We have received from Miohael Reckziegel 

♦ the first issue of'DER SCHALLTRICHTER' 


It has 58 pages - loose - punched to The advertisements are, of course, reproduced in 

European two-holes, for f i l in g in that sort fac simile, but some of the articles are re-typed 
of binder. (We would Immediately advise its 


4 producer to use an international hole 
4 system so that it will fit the four-hole 
4 and the Canadian/ PSA three-hole binders 
4 for obvious reasons.) 

♦ 

♦ This new modern publication aims to reprint 

♦ articles and advertisements from the famous 

♦ but very hard— to— f ind magazine 

♦ PHONOGRAPHISCHE ZEITSCHRIFT . 

♦ This was in the German language and was 

♦ originally published from 1900 to 1938. 

4 As one would imagine, 'Phonographiache Zeit 
4 sohrift' told its readers about the tech- 
+ nology, manufacture and novelties of/ in 
4 phonographs and gramophones, cylinders and 
4 discs and various accessories. 


with a modern typewriter. We find no fault with 
this latter for one merely wishes to gain the 
information and not examine old-fashioned type- 
faces. But a knowledge of German is essential. 

Herr Reckziegel will decide which articles and 
advertisements he reproduces in this new edition. 
We would agree that some material becomes rather 
useless with age if it was of gossipy or incon- 
sequential nature even originally. He solicits 
the loan of other material to include as he goes 
along. I would advise against this, for the P.Z. 
contained sufficient to reprint now without adding. 
To reprint it alone is a fine service without 
gilding the lily as it were. I might not inolude 
news of every new patent. So many were just 
eccentricities rather than of genuine value. 


>DER SCHALLTRICHTER* will appear irregularly. 
Collectors interested should write to Herr 
Michael Reckziegel, Kneippweg. 4. 

7750 Konstanz, Germany, promising to pay him 
12*50 Deutsche Mark up»n receiving each issue, 
(About £4*50, plus, one assume, bank charges) 


♦ Postscript: Your Editor had an enormous quantity of pahotostat copies made frca Phonographis che 

♦ Zeitschrift about a generation ago by what was then the cheapest method of those 

♦ times. The quality was, for the illustrations, far superior to many of those now 

♦ presented by Herr Reckziegel, so we would urge him to investigate a better method 

♦ mf reproduction than he now uses if the future of his project is to be successful. 

♦ Also, we cannot understand why a part of the text about Poulsen's Telegrapihone has 

♦ been enlarged to about twice its original size. 
♦♦♦♦♦♦++♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦+++♦♦++++♦+♦+++++++++++++♦+++++ 

♦ GREAT SINGERS OF THE AGE 

+ Some seven years ago we were able to borrow the 88 page book 'Great Singers of the Age', 

♦ published by the Gramophone Company late 1910-early 1911* We had it copied on to direct- 

♦ image printing pdates, but owing to the death of our then printer, we did nothing. We now 

♦ find those plates cannot be used. So our present printer has copied most pictures from 

♦ the plates on to film. We can pjrint a few as originally, the rest will come as text from our 

own typewriter in instalments. The first part is in this issue. 




I - 

** MAH AT HON * lw« 

mast M stayed with a aeodle, 
commeneitia mi ***© other edge 
nl mord, sad pis* mji towards the 

OSHO* H*S feoosdbov SfttHltJ tri 

set iacto* the front ot the mamme, 
cat sideways- a* with Uie actuary 
tubes a! Record*. 


“ MARATHON” ItaoarA. 

caa a* pfayad an any mate at Dine 

Maehftte bat la artier ta « a» 
Sottadbor in the corn** peeiUon, It 
may be aeceeeary to have oae at 
ear special adapter*, which tasaMe# 
yea la uee year present Santtdtaa. 


The "MARATHON' Sound- 
box, as itltwtnded aba*e, has be*t 
specially 4 e*ij>se«t in eabtwcfioa "vtm t 
this maoni, titriii*'* dthnef-tocae. «alj> 
greater rolatho hud H easdy attached: 
h. standard «{i*» «t mmltMm my ; 
08 fat itwetrt 

T» be obtained A all, tta tod- , 

M«c #»h*> i» O'* OraatopftMte 
Trade an mtwKania* -oasto*.' 
and make ft ythtr StwmSt Wfc" VC 
Price S|* Ptectauw «*«%., e' : 
special (MAnMi bay W 
separate adaptor. ; 

“MARATHON" N««U«* 

atroiigi j. maanaanM pf «4» ?e>d*-«j 
'W they are spedafly Mtwfactaretf'tei 
give a full dear l»i and MN* pm* 
recced* - rid 


•MARATHON" Record* .oust 

f he played with a needle, cctmurocing 
j on the elite*' edge <*f «n»d. ami play. 
,;. inf, urterdv the centre, The dcceddct 

I dtoald feteaet facte* the treat of the 
tn» chine bet sideways. a* with the 
ibriiiftary Ippes <>f rmchimn. 

••MARATHON" Records can 
be played «* any taaie of Rise 
Hariceiv ter in seder to act veer 
,Si*adbi!*i«) the tarred pwitteo, it 

J-toay be awsssary to have eat of #ttr 
ittpecia! adaptors, as flltutrated stems, 
' f.yritkb eagles yea to ate yrmt present 

9 M«Smk 


' Aeat Adaptors he oMwoedl 
I front yefeo fttater «» mtSatiottia £ the 
| verse and matte ot yoar natAlae. 

1 Mrfc * 2,S 


The "MARATHON" Record sapartoi t« alt «ter rate. ptejinjwp to 4 ®taaSS 4 §-»-» 
u a*w.l » Md«sr of under 3 amate* « otter teste# ot IMi» U&p *3 «M 

, w I ' I 

*' MARATHON'' Records are etch at lose, baft dear i* tttttt- 

“MAk&ftWlr Reeonls ah«S<I fee {hayed 0 a sped of appeodwddy y.iseyotuhge per «*«?**• 
vbare *;■ wwlly atratiMted in bracket* a the tetaloyuc, 

THE NATIONAL fiSAMOPHONE COMPANY, LTO„ IS City Real iOlCPON, E C, 

immurmr NOTICE, Mi yoohavr asy *gw»iw lb pMrttfat ’“'P&XH 

~~'&f ■--- ' — cypeasd mete ot your , 




Two Marathon record bags, kindly loaned by Leonard Watts 




2120 


TWO ADVERTISEMENTS FROM - - 
' Phonog r a p h i s ch e Zeitschrift' 





Phonograph „ARI0N“ 

Mein Phonograph „ARI0N“ hat vermOge meiner 
neuen Membrane, welche durch D. R. G. M. geschiitzt 
ist, eine uuerreicht laute imd klare Wiedergabe, die 
durch die eigenartige Spannung der Membrane erzielt 
wird. Reinheit and Fiille des Tones sind uniibertroffen. 

Die aus starkem Eisen besteheude Grundplatte so- 
wohl, als auch sammtliche Metallteile sind hechglanz 
polirt und fein vernickelt und auf einen soliden Eichen- 
holzkasten montiert. 

Da der Phonograph „ARI0N“ hervorragende Klang- 
fulle und elegautes Aussehen mit verhaltnismassiger 
Billigkeit vereint, so ist er der leichtest verk&ufliche 
Apparat. 

Phono graph en-Fabrik 

Herm. Schilling 

Inhaber Georg Peters 
Berlin S. 42, Ritterstr. 33. 



Grosste Sprechmaschinen- nnd Phonographen-W alzen-Fabrik der Welt! 

Compje 6|® de Phonographes, Cinematographes et Appareils de Precision 

» UTQ Actiengesellschaft mit 2.666.600 Fr. Capital. t> * TJi 

98 RUE RICHELIEU 98 1 AIiJ 

— vormais Pathe freres. 


• Weltausstellung PARIS 1900 — Grand Prix. a 


NEUHEIT 


Phonograph mit 2 auswechsel- 
baren Konussen, fiir Normal- 
und Stentor-Walzen, 
mit Federmotor 
fur ca. 5 Walzen. 


■ Preis: 190 Francs ■ 

(mit Zubehiir) 
Loco Chatou bei Paris. 
Cassa bei Bestellung. 

Wiederverkaufem 
hoher Itabatt. 


Illustrirte Preislisten 


auf Verlangen gratis 


All rights reserved. 

The Talking Machine Review, 19 Glendale Road, Bournemouth BH6 4JA. 









TALKING 


MACHINE 


REVIEW 


APRIL 1987 


EDISON 


PHONOGRAPH 


MONTHLY 


IMPORTANT 


FROM 


Volume 9 of the hound volumes of the very interesting little 
magazine which the Edison company sent to dealers each 
monthj is about to be reprinted. It will be reprinted in 
very limited edition, which in fact will make it equally 
rare even in its reprinted, as the originals are themselves. 
The price, as estimated at the present, will be about £14+ 
plus postage. I supply these to Europe and British Common 
wealth - most of the world except the continent of North & 
South America. If you have received previous volumes, you 
will receive this volume 9 automatically with your bill for 
immediate payment. If you have never received any previously 
there are still a few of earlier volumes left. Write in to 
enquire. Volume 2 is almost sold out completely, so do not 
delay. Ernie Bayly, 19 Glendale Road, Bournemouth BH6 4JA. 
In the Americas you should write to Allen Koenigsberg, 

502 E. 17th Street, Brooklyn, N Y 11226. U S A. 

Of course, you can begin with the new Volume 9. Just let 
us know right away. 

******** ************ 

EXPERT PICKUPS 

OFFER A COMPREHENSIVE RANGE OF STYLI: Early Mono Lps. All 
periods of lateral cut (conical and elliptical as required) 
Edison 2 & 4 minute sapphires and Blue Amberol diamonds. 

Pathe 0.008 and 0*016 ball sapphires in shanks. Series wired 
cartridges and stylii for all electrical reproduction of 
vertical cut records. All stylii are made to original makers 
specifications; guaranteed dimensionally. Prices and 
information from EXPERT PICKUPS, P 0 Box 3, Ashtead, 

Surrey KT 21 2QD. Telephone 03722 - 7^604 
****************************** 

VINTAGE LIGHT MUSIC SOCIETY 
For the enthusiast of light music on 78 rpm records. Send 
55pence for sample magazine and details of membership to 
Suart Upton, 4 Harvest Bank, West Wickham, Kent BR4 JDJ 
Annual subscription £ 2 surface mail to all. 


******************** 


********* 


PETER LACK. 

» FERNANDO de LUCIA 
t Vinyl pressings from ORIGINAL PH0N0TYPE METALS 
' The following are now available to subscribers 


M 1794 


Manon 

Lohengrin 


(C 1 91 8 Rigoletto 
M 1 91 9 Rigoletto 


Io son solo..Ahl dispar vision 
Da voi lontan 

Un di, se ben rammentomi 
Bella figlia dell' amore 


,M 1879 Aria de chiesa Pieta, Signore 


'C 3148 Tosti 


Marechiare (otherwise 

unpublished) 


HOWARD HOPE has collected phonograpsh and 
gramophones for 15 years and dealt professionally for over * 
ten. Anything (almost) wanted in this and other mechanical * 
antique fields, including paper roll organs, Polyphone, sewing * 
machines and typewriters. Particularly high prices paid for * 
rare machines. Please phone for a chat if you have any sales * 
or wants. Shop 01 - 499 - 6600 weekdays. L23 Grays Market, * 
1-7 Davies Mews, London W1. Also evenings and weekends on * 

01 _ 398 - 7130 * 

* 

****************************** 

* 

WANTED WANTED * 

Recently I met Joe Daniels, the famous drummer from the * 

•dance band days* way back. He is still looking for really * 

fine copies of three of his own recordings - his original 
collection having been stolen. They are Parlophones F 1243, * 

F 1571, F2397. If you can help him write to him at 
22. Ledway Drive, Wembley Park, Middlesex HA9 8TQ.. 
******************************** 

A SULLIVAN DISCOGRAPHY edited by Terrence Rees * 

The correct price for this excellent listing of recordings of* 
Arthur Sullivan's music over the years is £4.95. Available * 
from S.H.Turnbull, Cockfield House, 46 Front Street, Cockfield* 
Bishop Auckland, Co Durham DL 13 5DS. t 

********************** 

WANTED records (or tapes of) ocarina solos by Moise * 
Tapiero. Ernie Bayly, 19 Glendale Road, Bournemouth BH6 4JA. * 


* Limited stocks remain of the following vinyl material - 

* by Fernando de Lucia 

t M 1816 / 20 Duets + de Angelis: Ugonotti / Pescatori £7*50 
t M 1843 Pagliacci - Un tal gioco £7*50 

f M 2234 Boheme -Che gelida (otherwise unpublished) £7*50 

_ C 2562 Pagliacc- Serenata £5 

t C 2343 Mefistofele - Forma ideal £5 

( C 2508 Caro mio ben (Giordani) £5 

h ,M1754 Elisir d'amore - Una furtiva lagrima 
J 'M2234 Favorita - Spirto gentil 

, ,02531 Andrea Chenier - Colpito qui m'avete 
'C2532 Andrea Chenier - E volli pien d'amore 

■ ,02344 Mefistofele - Clma il tuo cor 

■ 'C2452 Iris - Apri la tua finestra (C.R.) 

,02435 Tosti- Aprile 
'02459 Tosti- Ninon 

1 , Ml 770 Traviata - Un di felice (+ A.de Angelis) 

'Ml 771 Traviata - Parigi, o cara (+ A. de Angelis) 

M215.V4 Amico Fritz - Duetto delle ciliege(+Angelis) £10 
,02392 Andrea Chenier - Come un bel di 
'C2572 R. Stoltz - Salome 
.Ml 762 Traviata - Lungo da lei 
M2117 Otello - Nium mi tema 

Although Fernando de Lucia recorded elsewhere from Manon 
and Lohengrin, the above selection includes his only 
interpretations of these two arias preserved on disc. A 
single disc likewise couples for the first time the complete 
Rigoletto quartet in which he is joined by De Angelis, 
Ferluga and Armentano. The aria de chiesa, often attributed 
to Stradella or (as indeed on the label) to Rossini, was 
composed more probably by Niedermeyer, a close associate of 
the latter; it is, moreover, the piece sung at Caruso's 
funeral by De Lucia himself. 

New list of vocal recordings for sale is now ready 
Peter Lack, 3 Grosvenor Gardens, London N 10 3TB 

telephone 01 - 444 - 9786. (Callers strictly by appointment 

only) 

******************* ** 

The Rakeway Brass Band Yearbook 1987 is available now. 

It includes details of solo and band competition results, 
mentioning som 5»000 instrumentalists worldwide. Profiles 
of the top twenty bands by Derek Broadbant, articles hy Roy 
Newsome, Peter Wilson, Tim Mutum. Special reports on 

National Youth Bands. Most important for readers of 
The Talking Machine Review ... It also has part 1 
of Frank Andrews complete discography of band records on 
cylinders and discs, in alphabetical order Of bands. 

Price £5.95 including postage ■ p rom Rakeway Music, 

Hollington, Cheadle, Staffordshire ST10 4HH. 



SYMPOSIUM RECORDS 

are pressed to "Collectors* Profile", that is, in uniform 
thickness, which very much reduces problems of warp, 
especially important at 78 rpm. We must point out that 
our records are pressed in vinyl so must not be played with 
old heavy sound boxes and pickups. Our catalogue includes- 

1000 Eugen d'Albert. 1st movement of Beethoven's Emperor Con- 
certo. His only electric recording. LP £5 

1001 M Siems, A Garulli, R Caligaris, A Bassi, E Carelli, 

A Lavidov, L Casini, M Ancona. From rare Path! Records 
1903 - 1912 LP £5 

1003 Furtwangler. His first recording of Beethoven 5th and 
the rare Brunswick Rosamunde overture. LP £5 

1004 Klemperer. Live Performance 1938. Benvenuto Cellini 
overture/l'Apres Midi d'un Faune 

1 01 CV’ 1011 Charles-Marie Widor. Symphonie Gothique played by 
the composer on the organ of St.Sulpice, Paris, which he 
designed. Direct pressings from original masters by EMI 
Records, available only as a set. 78 rpm £10 

1012 Vincent d'Indy. Danse Rythmique from Poemes des Montagnes 
(d'Indy), and Depart Matinal from Tableaux de Voyage 
(d'Indy). These recordings of 1923 are direct pressings 
from original masters by EMI Records Ltd. 78rpm £5 

1013 Jeno Hubay. Violin maker of Cremona (Hubay) and Berceuse 

(Hubay). Recordings of 1928, are direct pressings from 
original masters by EMI Records. 78 rpm £5 

1014 Edvard Grieg:Norwegian Bridal Procession(Grieg) 

Joseph Joachim; Hungarian Dance No.1. (Brahms-Joachim) 
These recordings of 1 903 are direct pressing from origi- 
nal masters by EMI Records. They are different pieces 
from those on D803. 78 rpm 

Terms= Private persons, money with order. Archives, Broadcast 
Authorities- promptly on receipt of goods. 

Post and packing. U.K. £1 up to 4 items. Eeet of the 
world, £2. 50 up to 4 items surface mail. 

Our catalogue continually being expanded, please write for 
latest catalogue, or request it with your first order. 

Levin Associates, 110 Derwent Avenue, East Barnet, 

Hertfordshire EN4 8LZ 

* * * ** * * # # * # * * * * »** 

RECORDS FOR SALE 

Miscellaneous 78 rpm records, including Gigli, Boston Prom 
Orchestra, Marek Weber, Paul Whiteman, The Goons, Guys & Dolls 
Bing Crosby, Ink Spots, Mantovani, Grace Moore, Danny Kaye, 
Winnifred Atwell, Tony Short, Fred Astajre& Ginger Rogers, 
Carroll Gibbons, Jimmie Young, Mantovani, Dean Marting & so on 
Mrs M. Martin, The Long Wood, Riffhams Chase, Little Baddow, 

Essex CM3 4AU 

it****************************** 

WANTED WANTED 

I am looking for examples of many kinds of cylinders, such 
as Ebonoid in round and square boxes, Sterling, Edison Bell, 
Clarion, Lamberts black, .pink, white, Busy Bee, and any other 
foreign and unusual American cylinders in good condition. 

Bill Eigenfeld, 388 Avenue X, Brooklyn, NY 11223, USA 
******************************* 

RECORD AUCTIONS BY MAIL 
Record Auctions, 78rpms only, 1900-1 940's popular, jazz, 
classicals, hillbilly. 50,000 must go. David Reiss, 3920 
Eve Drive, Seaford, NY 11783, USA. 
******************************* 

RECORD AUCTIONS BY MAIL 
Cylinders, 78's, some Lp's, selected from distinguished 
collections; everything from classical vocal to jazz. 

Reserve your copy of our next catalogue. Old Time Music, 

P.0.Box 130, Barrington, NJ 08007-0130, USA 

******************************* 

WANTED WANTED 

A horn for Edison Opera Phonograph, or a metal base-part of 
one. 

Alan Granleese, 144. Barnetts Road, Belfast BT5 7BD, 

Northern Ireland. 


STELLA - JOHNSON 

* Music Box Company 

* 2423-0 Old Middlefield Way, Mountain View, 

CA 94043, USA. 

We sell reprints of Stella and Mira music box literature. 

* We also have star wheels, pressure wheels or rollers. 

* Write for details 

****************************** 

* 

t LILLI LEHMANN & VICTOR MAUREL 

* We have borrowed original metal factory parts of these three 
very important historical records to press them in high 
quality black vinyl, on one side only. Details - 

* Lilli Lehmann: Liederkreis: Mondnacht (Eichendorff-Ji Schumann 

* Op.39 no. 3) Berlin, 2nd July, 1907. Odeon 50373 (XB31 35) 

* Victor Maurel: Otello: Era la notte(Boito-Verdi) . Milan 1904. 

. Fonotipia 39042 (Xph 58-3) (The original pitch-pipe band, 

removed from most commercial pressings is present on our 

* recording. A ' =440 hx @ 83.72 rpm reproduces the aria in the 

* key of C, the original score pitch) 

* Victor Ma rel: Falstaff: &uand 'ero paggio(Boito-Verdi) . 

„ Milan, January I906. Fonotipia 62016 (Xph 2332) Maurel sings 
this ditty three times, to the applause and shouts froma 
studio audience. 

* The three records are sold as a set @ $50, postpaid in U S A. 

* Overseas add- 

„ Air mail Europe $8.44, Canada $3.92, Australia/Japan $11.65 
Surface " $3.11, " $3.35, " $3.11 

* H, & M. Kurtz, 4026 Jackson Avenue, Culver City, 

* CA 90232, USA 


„ VJM VJM VJM VJM 

Vintage Jazz Mart. Established 30 years. Foremost record 
exchange journal. All types of records. Hundred pages 

* crammed tight - mainly 1920's and 1 930* s records for disposal 

* and wanted. Worldwide circulation. Send 75 pence for latest 

* issue. VJM, 4 Hillcrest Gardens, London NW2 6HZ 

* BOOKS, CATALOGS, MANUALS, POSTERS, MAGAZINES, all on antique 

* phonographs and records. We also have phonographs from time 

* to time. Send IRC coupon to Allen Koenigsberg, 

* 502 E. 17th Street, Brooklyn, NY 11226, U S A. (free lists) 

******************************* 

* 

The Peter Dawson Appreciation Society. 

* We would be very pleased to hear from anyone who has first 

* hand knowledge of the artist and his career to supplement 

* our archives. Mementoes of Dawson's times in Britain are 

„ also sought. Suitable material will be sent to the National 
Library of Australia, for addition to the collection of his 
papers deposited by Mrs. Con Dawson. 

* R, R. Hughes, Founder PDAS, New Hardwicke, Maesteg Road, 

* Llangynyd, Glamorgan CF34 9SN 

******************************* 

* 

THE COMPLETE TITTA RUFF0 

* Rubini Records are now on a club basis, .so all our Lp 

* re-issues will be available only from us. 

» The first club issue will be Titta Ruffo - The complete 
„ recordings, part.1. This will be comprised of 5 Lps in 
chronological order, cemmencing with the Pathes .. through 

* to 1912. The set will be in a box, with biographical notes 

* plus a COMPLETE & CORRECT discography, take numbers, dates; 

» the price Worldwide is £24*50 including postage (US$36»75). 

* Part 2 will include unpublished titles & film arias. Our 
re-issues undertaken with the co-operation of Ruff 's son. 
Rubini Record Club, 65b Livingstone Road, Hove, 

* Sussex BN 3 3WN. 

* ****************************** 

* WANTED articles, long or short, or paragraphs for 

The Talking Machine Review, 19 Glendale Road, 

Bournemouth BH6 4JA. 

******************************* 

» RUBINI RECORD CLUB has an interesting programme of other 
„ re-issues planned. Write for details. 65b .Livingstone 
Road, Hove, Sussex BN3 3WN 


BOOK REVIEW 

Vol.1. The Pre - History „ 

- of the set 'Hot Dance Bands in Germany' Photo Albums. 

This book arrived just at 'the last minute'. It is another 
part of the compilation of which we have already reviewed 
Part 2. In 125 pages Rainer Lotz gives us pictures of 
artists who introduced ragtime and 'hot' dance music to 
Germany, or who pre-date that in the 19th century, but whose 
work was in a natural line of progression to that type of 
music. The pictures begin with the reproduction of a notice 
from the German 'Illustrirtes Magazin' of 1846 of "The 
Ethiopian Serenaders" , then an illustration of 'Uncle Tom's 
Cabin' which was performed by Jarrett and Palmer's American 
Negro Company in 1879« We see some of the soloists of the 
Fisk Jubilee Singers which toured Germany in 1877-78. 

As well as 'Minstrel Troupes', famous instrumentalists went 
to Germany at the turn of the century - such as the banjo 
duo Clarke and Earle, who were recorded in London at this 
time for Berliner records. Bruno Seidler-Winkler, who became 
musical director for Deutsche Grammophon records in 1904, 
began to record 'cake walks', as did the Biichner Orchester 
which appeared under many pseudonyms on many 'labels'. 

Individuals and duets featured the 'modem' American songs 
and dances, such as Arabella Fields, Scott & Whaley (who 
settled in England), Franco Piper, Louis Douglas, Will Bishop < 
Madge Lessing,. ... until we come to Giorgi Vintilescu who 
by 1911 led the band at the Palais de Danse, Berlin's 
leading ballroom, which recorded for all the major companies 
and became the most important exponent of orchestral ragtime. ’ 

This is an important picture book reproducing some extremely 
rare photographs which the author must have taken a long 
time to track down and assemble. Each picture is faced with 1 
a summary giving what biographical notes are available, the 
context of the artists, nature of performance, etc. 

This is an extremely useful reference book of this genre of 
entertainment. A pioneering work. Text is in Enlish and 
German. 

Unfortunately we have no price. Its companion volume was 
42 DM, It is published by Der Jazzfreund, 

Von Staufenbergstrasse 24, 5750 Menden 1, Germany. 

**###*#*#*#**##*****##******** «' 

COUNT JOHN McCORMACK APPEAL 

Johnston Cassettes of 28A Wisbech Road, March, Cambs PEI 5 8EB ' 
appeals for cassette dubbings of the following recordings 
made by the great tenor, to ensure an absolutely complete 
reissue of his recordings. 

Edison Cylinders : 13124 Snowy breasted Pearl, 13142 Meeting 
of the waters, 13145 Irish emigrant, 13146 Avoumeen, 13152 
Killamey, 13154 Love thee dearest, 1 31 91 Believe me 
Edison Bell cylinders : 6443 Green isle of Erin,6451 Wearing 
of the green 

Sterling cylinder : 614 A Nation once again 

G & T 7"! 3-2513 Love thee dearest, 3-2519 Belive me 

3-2522 Minstrel Boy, G & T 10" 3-2171 Molly Bawn, 3-2139 

Kathleen Mavoumeen, 3-2171 Foggy Dew 

Zononhone ias by 'Mr John O'Reilly' X-42210 Has sorrow 

X-42208 Believe me, X-42258 Avoumeen 

Ode on 71" '2895 Dear little shamrock, 2896 Come back to Erin 
Victor unpublished ; God's hand BI6763-2; Le Crucifix 1916 
B 18391-1; The last rose of summer 1931; Der Jungling 1923. 

H M V unpublished : Der Soldat (The soldier's execution) 

Bb 5099-1 1937 broacast; The triumph of time and truth: 

Dryads and Sy Ivans. All these recordings are definitely in 
existence. In exchange we are willing to supply any other 
McCormack title. We have 44 unpublished items including 
'Und willst du deinen Liebsten Sterben sehen' , 'What a wonder 
ful world it would be', 'The sweetest flower that blows', 

OAE 8823 'Blind Ploughman', 'On wings of song', 'Alma mia' . 
Please let us know even if you have only one item we seek.AU 
transactions will be treated in confidence. We now have 723 
of his recordings available on 25 cassettes. 

Price £79*95 (or $130 U.S.) fully inclusive 


APPEAL APPEAL 

The Edison National Historic Site still seeks some copies 
of Edison Diamond Discs to make up a complete collection, 
as listed below ... 

80,000 82,000 83,000 50,000 

series series series series 



82,000 

series 



83,000 

series 

50,000 

series 


66 

82000 

82109 

82522 

83000 

50000 

50166 

70 

2 

110 

523 

1 

3 

194 

78 

3 

132 

524 

4 

4 

204 

79 

4 

162 

529 

5 

6 

206 

86 

5 

165 

530 

6 

7 

207 

92 

6 

166 

533 

7 

8 

208 

101 

7 

173 

542 

9 

9 

209 

106 

8 

181 

546 

10 

10 

222 

109 

9 

195 

547 

11 

11 

223 

124 

10 

201 

548 

12 

12 

262 

158 

11 

202 

552 

14 

13 

277 

180 

12 

214 

562 

16 

14 

278 

197 

13 

257 

565 

1? 

15 

279 

199 

14 

273 

566 

20 

16 

280 

200 

15 

274 

571 

21 

19 

319 

202 

16 

275 


22 

20 

366 

205 

17 

277 


26 

21 

421 

206 

18 

279 


27 

22 

429 

208 

19 

282 


29 

23 

430 

212 

20 

283 


31 

25 

431 

217 

21 

290 


37 

26 

432 

223 

22 

309 


40 

27 

548 

243 

23 

311 


47 

29 

551 

250 

24 

317 


48 

30 

552 

257 

25 

31 8 


50 

32 

559 

259 

26 

320 


55 

33 

666 

261 

27 

331 


56 

34 

889 

262 

28 

332 


58 

35 

943 

263 

264 

265 
267 
268 

269 

270 
271 
272 
278 
424 
473 
536 

29 

30 

34 

35 
38 
42 
44 
49 
57 
66 
68 
69 
71 

333 

343 

350 

500 

501 

502 

503 

504 

505 

507 

508 
509 
£11 


60 

61 

75 

83 

36 

38 

40 

41 

42 
44 

46 

47 

48 

49 

50 
57 
68 

950 

981 

51000 

046 

185 

226 

229 

265 

360 

370 

518 

608 

652 


57000 

58000 

59000 

59300 

59500 

65300 

series 

series 

series 

series 

series 

series 

57000 

58000 

59000 

59308 

59519 

653000 

12 

1 

15 

and 


1 

16 

6 

17 

on 


.3 

23 

27 

and 



5 

35 

and • 

on 



6 

and 

on 




8 

on 





9 

— — - 

— — 

- — — 

— — — 

— — — 

in 


All assistance will gratefully 
appreciated. Write to - 
The Director, 

Edison National Historic Site, 
Main Street / Lakeside Avenue, 
West Orange, 

N. J. 07052, 

U. S. A. 


Johnstone Cassettes, 28A Wisbech Road, March, Cambs PEI 5 8EB 



The Talking Machine Review 
19 Glendale Road 
Bournemouth BH6 4JA 
England 


u 

"3 

□ 

3 


O 

< 


CD QJ 
“3 I— 1 

C/1 CD 
(D a 
01 


U1 

I 

T3 
1 
h* 

3 

c+ TD 
CD CD 

a 1 
3 

H- 
C+ 


3 
01 
c+ 

c+ CD 


CD 

1 


0 
c 
1 

1 3 
CD CD 


a 

c 

n 

CD 


a t 

"3 ->* 

01 o 

c+ CJ 
CD 


m 
> 
c n 
m 

a 

o 


T1 

o 


WANTED WANTED 

Cassette tape service. Vintage Hawaiian music recordings as issued 
in the USA and Hawaii, especially recordings by Kalama's 
Quartette. Early 1920's - 1930's. Books & discographical details 
urgently required. 

Peter Mahoney, 81 Brucehill Road, Dumbarton G82 4ER, Scotland. 

it******************************** 

WANTED WANTED 

Can someone kindly supply me with a recording of *An old bazaar in 
Cairo 1 - the tune which Wilson, Kepple and Betty used to dance to? 
Derek Tracey, 45 Valeside Gardens, Colwick, Nottingham NG4 2EL. 
********************************** 

RESEARCH - ASSISTANCE SOLICITED 
We are undertaking research into the activities of Nicole. 

We should be grateful to receive any information you can send us 
of any Nicole Champion Cylinders, Nicole Records. Any other makes 
which used Nicole masters, such as Empire Record, Sovereign, 

The Conqueror (not later USA make), The Conqueror-Regent Record, 
Whytesdale, Universal Record, Burlington Record, Pelican Record, 
Milophone Record. Every small piece of information about what 
you can see on the record labels, or pressed into the label 
surround will be welcomed. 

Frank Andrews, 46 Aboyne Road, London NW10 OHA, 
********************************** 

DURIUM RESEARCH 

I am researching the activities of Durium throughout the world. 
Information on the numerous companies involved woulr be greatly 
appreciated. As would details of Continental masters, Italian T 
series, American 5000 masters, and some language courses, e.g. 
Esperanto, Linguaphone, in the E1000 series, 

I still have many gaps in the E5000 and SD advertising issues. 

Barry Pliskin, 14 Holdenhurst Avenue, Bournemouth BH7 6RD. 
********************** *********** 

Creegan Records, 510 Washington Street, Steubenville, Ohio 43952, 
USA. Records, books, magazines, catalogues, 78's, Lp's, 
classical vocal, auction lists, & fixed prices, plus articles. 

Lists/magazines &10.00 overseas, $5*00 U.S. 
********************************** 

WANTED WANTED 

Autographs of musicians (singers, violinists, composers 1880-1950) 
Photocards signed and letters, etc. Please send details of what 
you have to offer. 

Roland Kupper, Moersbergstrasse 58, 4057 Basel, Switzerland. 

************************** ******* 

PHONOGRAPH & GRAMOPHONE spares and 
accessories, springs, needles, styli, reproducers, diaphragms, 
gaskets, horn, etc. Over 100 items in catalogue. Send self- 
addressed stamped envelope (overseas I.R.C. for seamail, or 2xIRC 
for airmail) for current catalogue. 

Phonoparts, 157 Childwall Valley Road, Liverpools LI 6 1LA 

********************************** 

FOR SALE large stock of old needle tins filled with 
needles. Send for free list. Also wanted any kind of old gramo- 
phones or phonographs. I buy and pay high continental prices. 
Offers to Guido Severi jns , Bunderstraat 6, 6231 EL Me ersen, Holland. 
I visit Britain 10 times a year and I do pay more than British 
dealers I 

********************************** 

GRAMOPHONE NEEDLE TINS WANTED by 
specialist collector. Any makes/ quantity. Collections purchased. 

R. Lambert, 24 Churchway, Weston Favell, Northampton NN3 3BT 

********************************** 

I would like to correspond with others, who like me, collect only 
unusual and rare phono's and recordings. 

C. Mavoides, Box 432, Roscoe, NY 1277^, USA 

********************************** 

AMR PUBLISHING COMPANY, P 0 Box 3007, ARLINGTON, WA 98223, 
USA. We publish service manuals for juke boxes of all makes, over 
300 in fact. We also publish book on / and how to identify juke 
boxes. Write to us for details. Phone (206) - 659 - ^434